2+2 (album)

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2+2
Clare Fischer & Salsa Picante Present "2 + 2".jpg
Studio album by Clare Fischer
Released February 1981
Recorded September 1980
at Capitol Records
Genre Latin jazz
Label Pausa Records
PR 7086
Clare Fischer chronology
Alone Together
(1980)
2+2
(1981)
Machaca
(1981)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
The Los Angeles Times 4/5 stars[1]
External audio
You may listen to "Du, Du...." here

2+2 is an eponymous album of a vocal quartet called 2+2 with music by the Latin jazz ensemble known as Salsa Picante that was led by the American keyboardist/composer-arranger Clare Fischer. It was recorded in September 1980 and released in February 1981 by Pausa Records,[1][2] and in Germany on the MPS label, as Foreign Exchange – The First Album.[3] Tracks 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7 would be reissued on CD in 1999, and as a digital download in 2012, as Latin Patterns, a compilation of remastered highlights from four of Fischer's MPS LPs from this period.[4][5][6]

The album represents a number of firsts for Fischer, including his first Grammy (specifically, the album's final track, "Guajira Pa' La Jeva", named 1981's Best Latin Recording),[7][8] as well as a pair of recording debuts, first, that of 2+2, the vocal quartet with which Fischer supplemented his Latin jazz ensemble[1] (thus tying together two key components of his wide-ranging musical universe), and, of equal if not greater import, that of his son Brent Fischer, marking the beginning of a fruitful – and more than three-decade-long – professional association.

Reception[edit]

Los Angeles Times jazz critic Leonard Feather awarded the album four stars, making particular note of the album's seamless blend of vocal and instrumental units:

Their blend is splendid, they are at times expertly integrated with the band through Fischer's compositions, lyrics and arrangements; and they are quadrilingual, starting in German and proceeding to English, Spanish and doo-be-doo, the Esperanto of jazz. The rhythm, generally timbales-oriented, could have used more bottom. Darlene Koldenhoven, the lead soprano, is a striking discovery.[1]

Track listing[edit]

All selections composed by Clare Fischer except where noted.

Side A

  1. "Du, Du...." (trad./arr. Clare Fischer) – 5:57
  2. "Legacy" – 2:35
  3. "Morning" – 3:36
  4. "Guajira Pa' La Jeva" (words – Jose "Perico" Hernadez, music – Poncho Sanchez and Clare Fischer) – 4:30

Side B

  1. "Leavin'" – 3:25
  2. "Funquiado" – 6:46
  3. "Thru the Ages" – 4:21
  4. "Melancolico" (words – Barbara Ransom, music – Clare Fischer) – 7:07

Personnel[edit]

  • Clare Fischer – leader, Fender-Rhodes electric piano, Yamaha EX-42 organ, Yamaha YC-30 combo organ
  • Gary Foster – flute and soprano sax; on side A (tracks 2 & 3) and side B (tracks 1 & 3) – sopranino and alto sax, plus sopranino, soprano, alto, tenor, bass and gran bass recorders
  • John Chiodini – electric guitar; on side A (tracks 2 & 3) and side B (tracks 1 & 3) – acoustic guitar and hollow-bodied electric guitar
  • Poncho Sanchez – conga, bongo, campana
  • Ramon Banda (only on side A, tracks 1 & 4, and side B, track 2 & 4) – clave
  • Alex Acuña (only on side A, tracks 1 & 4, and side B, track 2 & 4) – timbales, percussion
  • Roland Vazquez (only on side A, tracks 1 & 4, and side B, track 2 & 4) – drums
  • Brent Fischer – electric bass
  • Oscar Meza – string bass
  • Luis Conte (only on side A, tracks 2 & 3, and side B, track 1 & 3) – timbales, percussion
  • Andre Fischer (only on side A, tracks 2 & 3, and side B, track 1 & 3) – drums
  • José "Perico" Hernandez – guest vocalist on A4 and B4
  • Darlene Koldenhoven – lead soprano
  • Mary Hylan – second soprano (sings lead on first bridge of "Morning," rock section of "Thru the Ages," and first part of "Guajira")
  • Amick Byram – tenor (solo on "Leavin'")
  • John Laird – baritone

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Feather, Leonard. "Jazz Albums". The Los Angeles Times. February 22, 1981. Retrieved 2013-02-24.
  2. ^ "Clare Fischer & Salsa Picante presents "2 + 2" (Musical LP, 1981)". Worldcat. Retrieved 2013-05-26.
  3. ^ "Foreign Exchange – The first album (Music, 1981)". Worldcat. Retrieved 2013-05-27.
  4. ^ Liner Notes from Latin Patterns
  5. ^ "Latin Patterns (Music, 1999)". Worldcat. Retrieved 2013-05-27.
  6. ^ "Latin Patterns: The Legendary MPS Sessions Overview".[dead link] Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-05-27.
  7. ^ Green, Paul. "Quincy Jones Takes Top Honors at Grammy Awards; Miscellaneous Fields". Billboard. March 6, 1982. Retrieved 2013-05-26.
  8. ^ Past Winners Search for "Clare Fischer". GRAMMY.com. Retrieved 2013-05-26.