Clarence (1922 film)

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Clarence
Clarence-newspaperad-1922.jpg
Poster for the film from a newspaper.
Directed by William C. deMille
Produced by Adolph Zukor
Jesse L. Lasky
Written by Clara Beranger (adaptation & scenario)
Based on Clarence
by Booth Tarkington
Starring Wallace Reid
Agnes Ayres
Cinematography L. Guy Wilky
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date
  • October 15, 1922 (1922-10-15) (NewYork)
  • November 19, 1922 (1922-11-19) (US)
Running time
7 reels; (6,146 feet)
Country United States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

Clarence is a 1922 American silent comedy drama, based on a play by Booth Tarkington, produced by Famous Players-Lasky and distributed through Paramount Pictures. It was directed by William C. deMille and starred Wallace Reid in his penultimate screen appearance.[1]

In E.J. Fleming's 2007 biography of Wallace Reid, it is stated that many in Reid's neighborhood, including Rudolph Valentino, remembered that Reid kept the neighborhood awake playing his saxophone. It is not stated whether Reid was honing his skills for this film or just enjoying some leisure.

The film is now considered a lost film.[2][3]

Cast[edit]

Plot[edit]

The father of a quirky family, the Wheelers, hires an ex-soldier, Clarence (Reid), as a handyman. Clarence falls for the family's governess, Violet (Ayres).

Mrs. Wheeler (Williams) suspects that Violet and her husband (Martindel) are carrying on, and Mrs. Wheeler begins to develop an attraction to Clarence. Hubert Stem (Menjou), Mr. Wheeler's avaricious private secretary, one day shows Mr. Wheeler an article about Charles Short, an army deserter, and insists that Clarence is in actuality Charles Short.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The AFI Catalog of Feature Films: Clarence
  2. ^ "Progressive Silent Film List: Clarence". silentera.com. 
  3. ^ Clarence at TheGreatStars.com;Lost Films Wanted
  4. ^ Fleming, John (August 1924). "Clarence". Pictures and the Picturegoer. London: Odhams Press. Retrieved June 29, 2016. 

External links[edit]