Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center

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University of Maryland, College Park campus
Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center.jpg
The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center
Use Performance venue and academic building
Style
Erected 2001
Location Stadium Drive at Route 193,
College Park, MD 20742
38°59′27″N 76°57′02″W / 38.99083°N 76.95056°W / 38.99083; -76.95056Coordinates: 38°59′27″N 76°57′02″W / 38.99083°N 76.95056°W / 38.99083; -76.95056
Namesake Clarice Smith
Architect Moore Ruble Yudell
Trivia The largest single building ever constructed by the State of Maryland[1]
Website The Clarice Smith Center Website

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center is a performing arts complex on the campus of the University of Maryland, College Park.[2] The 318,000-square-foot (29,500 m2) facility, which opened in 2001, houses six performance venues;[3] the UMD School of Music;[4] and the UMD School of Theatre, Dance, and Performance Studies.[5] It also houses the Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library.[6] The Center operates under the auspices of the University of Maryland College of Arts and Humanities.[7]

The Center presents an annual performance season of music, dance and theatre featuring visiting artists and student/faculty artists from the performing arts academic programs.[8] Since 2014, the venue has styled itself The Clarice, in an apparent effort to seem hip and modern; the introduction of this nomenclature was accompanied by a series of mostly-free-of-charge events called the NextNOW Festival near the beginning of the Fall semester.[9] The Center also rents performance and meeting space to community groups.[10]

The building is located on the northern side of the University of Maryland campus, off University Boulevard (MD-193) and Stadium Drive in Prince George’s County, Maryland. It is directly across the street from Capital One Field at Byrd Stadium and the 800-space Stadium Drive parking garage.[11]

History[edit]

The Clarice Smith Center is named in honor of visual artist Clarice Smith, whose late husband Robert H. Smith (UM ’50) was a major philanthropist who supported projects in culture, business and Jewish life. As an alumnus of the University of Maryland, he made major contributions to The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center and to the Robert H. Smith School of Business.[12]

The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center was originally conceived as an academic center for teaching the performing arts, but during the planning stages that mission evolved[citation needed] to include not only presentation of performances by touring artists, but also the creation of programs that focused on the people of Prince George’s County, Maryland, where the University of Maryland is located.[13] Thus there are now occasionally events organized entirely by outside contractors, for which the Center disclaims responsibility.

Architecture[edit]

Situated on 17 acres (69,000 m2) of land, the 318,000-square-foot (29,500 m2) facility was the largest single building ever constructed by the State of Maryland. The initial cost of the building was $130 million, supported in partnership by the State of Maryland, the University of Maryland, and Prince George’s County. It was designed by international architects Moore Ruble Yudell in association with Ayers/Saint/Gross; acoustical consultant Kirkegaard Associates; theatre consultants Theatre Project Consultants; mechanical/electrical/plumbing engineering by Henry Adams LLC; and lobby interiors, Gensler. Construction was by Turner Construction Company.[14]

Five of the Center’s six performance spaces are accessible from the Grand Pavilion, the Center’s main lobby; the sixth is at the top of the stairs in the Upper Pavilion.

  • Grand Pavilion[15]
  • Dekelboum Concert Hall[16]
    • 962 seat concert hall[3]
  • Ina and Jack Kay Theatre[17]
    • 626 seat proscenium theatre [3]
    • Used for performances with large casts and elaborate sets[3]
  • Joseph and Alma Gildenhorn Recital Hall[18]
    • 297 seat jewel-box theatre [3]
    • Bring acoustics to highlight musical performances[3]
  • Dance Theatre[19]
    • 207 seat theatre
    • sprung wooden floors and retractable seats[3]
    • It holds performances, rehearsals, lectures and workshops[3]
  • Robert and Arlene Kogod Theatre[20]
    • This 156 seat theatre is a multipurpose black box theatre[3]
    • It holds performances along with meetings and receptions[3]
  • Cafritz Foundation Theatre[21]
    • An 86 seat black box theatre[3]
    • It holds performances, lectures, meetings, and special events[3]
  • Leah H. Smith Lecture Hall, which often hosts student recitals, and occasionally other free events such as Creative Dialogues and Talk-Backs with performers. Also used as a classroom for various different courses.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mac To Millennium: Letter C". Lib.umd.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  2. ^ "The University of Maryland :: A Public Research University Advancing our State and the World". Umd.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Our Facilities | The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center". theclarice.umd.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  4. ^ School of Music (2014-07-12). "Home | School of Music". Music.umd.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-09-18. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  6. ^ "Michelle Smith Performing Arts Library, UMD Libraries". Lib.umd.edu. 2014-04-30. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  7. ^ "College of Arts & Humanities". Arhu.umd.edu. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  8. ^ "The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center". theclarice.umd.edu. Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  9. ^ "archive.org copy of theclarice.umd.edu showing 2014 NextNOW Festival". Archived from the original on July 27, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Rental Inquiries | The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center". theclarice.umd.edu. Retrieved 2016-04-04. 
  11. ^ "Google Maps". Maps.google.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2014-08-06. 
  12. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-06-13. Retrieved 2010-10-01. 
  13. ^ Stamler, Gayle. “In Maryland, a Gateway to the Community Through the Arts,” Metropolitan Universities Journal, Vol. 15, No. 3, October 2004. Abstract asserts that "the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center ponds [sic. Opens?] new doors to performance and learning for communities within and around the university through collaborative activities on and off campus. These are made possible in part by a unique relationship between the university and Prince George's County." "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-06-09. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  14. ^ Hoffman, Ian B., Storch, Christopher A., Foulkes, Timothy J.: Acoustic Society of America Halls for Music Performance, Another Two Decades of Experience 1982–2002, pages 244–245. University of Toronto Press, 2003.
  15. ^ [1][dead link]
  16. ^ [2][dead link]
  17. ^ "Kay Theater". Archived from the original on June 14, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Gildenhorn Theater". Archived from the original on January 31, 2009. Retrieved September 30, 2010. 
  19. ^ "Dance Theater". Archived from the original on February 21, 2009. Retrieved September 30, 2010. 
  20. ^ "Kogod Theater". Archived from the original on January 22, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2010. 
  21. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-12-23. Retrieved 2010-09-30.