Clarke's Pool Meadow SSSI

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Clarke's Pool Meadow
Site of Special Scientific Interest
Green Winged Orchids - geograph.org.uk - 790815.jpg
Green winged orchids in a nature reserve (Orchis morio)
Clarke's Pool Meadow SSSI is located in Gloucestershire
Clarke's Pool Meadow SSSI
Location within Gloucestershire
Area of Search Gloucestershire
Grid reference SO668061
Coordinates 51°45′11″N 2°28′54″W / 51.753053°N 2.481631°W / 51.753053; -2.481631Coordinates: 51°45′11″N 2°28′54″W / 51.753053°N 2.481631°W / 51.753053; -2.481631
Interest Biological
Area 1.8 hectare
Notification 1997
Natural England website

Clarke's Pool Meadow (grid reference SO668061) is a 1.8-hectare (4.4-acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest in Gloucestershire, notified in 1997.[1][2] It lies on the flat top of 'Old Hill' about half a mile south of Blakeney. The site consists of two fields which were purchased by the Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust in 1997. The site was designated an SSSI in the same year and it is one of the finest surviving traditional hay meadows in Gloucestershire.[3]

Similar meadows have been lost due to agricultural improvement. The site overlies Old Red Sandstone. This contributes to the unusual mix of grassland plants.[3][4]

Plants[edit]

The meadows support a show of thousands (estimated at 45,000) of green-winged orchid in May, a colony of some size in this part of Gloucestershire. Also flowering in the late spring are common twayblade, adder's-tongue, cowslip, bluebell, and pignut. Taller grass and flowers develop over the summer and produce a haycrop at that time. Recordings include quaking-grass, common knapweed, meadow vetchling, downy oat-grass, field scabious, meadow buttercup, yellow-rattle, oxeye daisy, common bird's-foot trefoil, goat's-beard, fairy flax and Devil's-bit scabious. Meadow saffron flowers following the hay cut.[3][4]

Invertebrates, mammals and bird life[edit]

The neutral meadow flora, broad hedges and the rough field margins support a diversity of invertebrates, small mammals and predators such as the barn owl.[4]

Conservation[edit]

The traditional method for management is hay cutting followed by sheep grazing. Hedges are maintained from natural species.[3]

Publications[edit]

  • Kelham, A, Sanderson, J, Doe, J, Edgeley-Smith, M, et al., 1979, 1990, 2002 editions, 'Nature Reserves of the Gloucestershire Trust for Nature Conservation/Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust'
  • Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust Nature Reserve Guide (January 2011)
  • 'Where to see Wildlife in the Forest of Dean', January 2012, Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust

References[edit]

  1. ^ Natural England SSSI information on the citation
  2. ^ Forest of Dean District Local Plan Review, adopted November 2005, Appendix D 'Nature Conservation Site Designations Within the Forest of Dean District', Sites of Special Scientific Interest
  3. ^ a b c d Kelham, A, Sanderson, J, Doe, J, Edgeley-Smith, M, et al, 1979, 1990, 2002 editions, 'Nature Reserves of the Gloucestershire Trust for Nature Conservation/Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust'
  4. ^ a b c Gloucestershire Wildlife Trust Nature Reserve Guide (January 2011) for its 50th anniversary

SSSI Source[edit]

External links[edit]