Clay Cane

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Clay Cane
ClayCane.jpg
BornUnited States
OccupationJournalist, Author, Television Personality
EducationRutgers University
Notable worksLive Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race,
Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church
Notable awardsGMAD’s 2016 James Baldwin Revolutionary Award.
Website
www.claycane.net

Clay Cane is a journalist, author, television commentator, radio host and filmmaker. He is the director and creator of the documentary Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church,[1] which was nominated for a 2016 GLAAD Media Award.[2] He is the author of Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race,[3] which was released June 2017. Cane is also the host of The Clay Cane Show on SiriusXM Urban View channel 126, which tackles the most controversial topics in the country with thought leaders, policy makers and influencers.

Career[edit]

A graduate from Rutgers University, Phi Beta Kappa, with a B.A. in English and African-American Studies, Cane's commentary is heard on MTV, HLN, MSNBC, FOX, VH1, CNN and numerous other television programs, including The O'Reilly Factor, Don Lemon Tonight and Melissa Harris-Perry. He has contributed to print and online publications including CNN.com, The Washington Post and Gawker.[4]

Cane was the host of Clay Cane Live, a weekly, call in and political radio talk show on WWRL 1600AM, which was home to radio programs for Reverend Al Sharpton and Ed Schultz. After 86 years, the station aired its final broadcast in December 2013. In November 2017, Cane returned to radio on SiriusXM Urban View channel 126 for The Clay Cane Show.

He is a member of New York Film Critics Online and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association.

Cane is the co-editor and contributing writer of the 2012 anthology For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Still Not Enough: Coming of Age, Coming Out, and Coming Home. He also contributed to Where Did Our Love Go: Love and Relationships in the African-American Community. In 2015, Cane created, directed and produced the BET.com original documentary Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church. Premiering at NYU in November 2015, the film explored homophobia in the black church by tackling the intersections of race, gender, sexuality and religion. The film earned a 2016 GLAAD Media Award nomination for Outstanding Digital Journalism and a Black Reel Award nomination for Best Television Documentary or Special. On February 24, 2016, The White House[5] featured Cane as a Black History Month speaker along with a screening of the documentary. Cane was also presented on a panel discussion, which focused on the film, faith, sexuality and the African American community. He has toured the film at various universities and organizations all over the country.

Cane is the author of Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race, which "marches you through the journey of Clay’s life, from enduring spiritual violence in the African-American church, to learning unique lessons from transgender sex workers, to living in the double consciousness of blackness and gayness. Each essay is delivered with vulnerability and cultural critique, using his narrative to highlight the most sidelined of communities. Live Through This is the new American story." The book was published via Cleis Press in June 2017. Publishers Weekly called the book, "Cane’s observations on the intersections of class and race, which do not shy away from the quagmire of being poor in America, resonate in today’s fraught political climate. Even when he addresses painful issues such as domestic violence, sexual exploitation, food insecurity, and inadequate mental health care, he retains humor and compassion."

Published works[edit]

  • Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race (Cleis Press, 2017)[6]
  • For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Still Not Enough: Coming of Age, Coming Out, and Coming Home (Magnus, 2012)[7]
  • Where Did Our Love Go: Love and Relationships in the African-American Community (Agate Bolden, 2013)[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "BET.com's Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church". BET.com. Retrieved November 3, 2015.
  2. ^ "BET Receives GLAAD Award Nomination for Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church". BET.com. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
  3. ^ "Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race". Amazon. Retrieved May 15, 2017.
  4. ^ "How Sex Workers Taught Me to Hustle". Gawker. Retrieved August 21, 2015.
  5. ^ "White House to screen documentary about homophobia in the black church". MSNBC. Retrieved February 23, 2016.
  6. ^ "Live Through This: Surviving the Intersections of Sexuality, God, and Race". Amazon. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  7. ^ "For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Still Not Enough: Coming of Age, Coming Out, and Coming Home". Amazon. Retrieved August 28, 2012.
  8. ^ "Where Did Our Love Go: Love and Relationships in the African-American Community". Amazon. Retrieved February 12, 2013.

External links[edit]