Clay County, Missouri

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Clay County, Missouri
ClayCoMo CourtHouse.jpg
South side of the Clay County Courthouse (designed by Wight and Wight) in Liberty
Map of Missouri highlighting Clay County
Location in the U.S. state of Missouri
Map of the United States highlighting Missouri
Missouri's location in the U.S.
Founded January 2, 1822
Seat Liberty
Largest city Kansas City
Area
 • Total 409 sq mi (1,059 km2)
 • Land 397 sq mi (1,028 km2)
 • Water 11 sq mi (28 km2), 2.8%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 235,637
 • Density 559/sq mi (216/km²)
Congressional districts 5th, 6th
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website www.claycountymo.gov

Clay County is a county located in the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 census, the county had a population of 221,939,[1] making it the fifth-most populous county in Missouri. Its county seat is Liberty.[2] The county was organized January 2, 1822, and named in honor of U.S. Representative Henry Clay from Kentucky, later member of the United States Senate and United States Secretary of State.[3][4]

Clay County is part of the Kansas City, MO-KS Metropolitan Statistical Area and contains many of the city's northern suburbs, along with a substantial portion of the City of Kansas City.

Clay County owns and operates the Midwest National Air Center in Excelsior Springs.

History[edit]

Clay County was settled primarily from migrants from the Upper Southern states of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. They brought slaves and slaveholding traditions with them, and quickly started cultivating crops similar to those in Middle Tennessee and Kentucky: hemp and tobacco. Clay was one of several counties settled mostly by Southerners to the north and south of the Missouri River. Given their culture and traditions, this area became known as Little Dixie. In 1860, slaves made up 25% or more of the county's population.[5] Residents generally supported the Confederacy during the Civil War, as the Confederate flag flew over the county courthouse for many years following the end of the Civil War.

Many members of the Latter Day Saint movement found refuge in Clay County in November 1833. In 1836, mobs drove the members of the church from the county.[6] Leaders of this church, most notably Joseph Smith, were imprisoned for some months in Clay County in the jail at Liberty. In May 2012, the LDS Church opened a Kansas City Missouri Temple six miles southwest of the Liberty Jail site at 7001 Searcy Creek Parkway in Kansas City, Missouri.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 409 square miles (1,060 km2), of which 397 square miles (1,030 km2) is land and 11 square miles (28 km2) (2.8%) is covered by water.[8] It is the fourth-smallest county in Missouri by area.

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major highways[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1830 5,338
1840 8,283 55.2%
1850 10,382 25.3%
1860 13,023 25.4%
1870 15,564 19.5%
1880 15,571 0.0%
1890 19,856 27.5%
1900 18,903 −4.8%
1910 20,302 7.4%
1920 20,455 0.8%
1930 26,811 31.1%
1940 30,417 13.4%
1950 45,221 48.7%
1960 87,474 93.4%
1970 123,322 41.0%
1980 136,488 10.7%
1990 153,411 12.4%
2000 184,006 19.9%
2010 221,939 20.6%
Est. 2015 235,637 [9] 6.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2015[1]

As of the census[14] of 2010, 221,939 people, 72,558 households, and 50,137 families resided in the county. The population density was 558 people per square mile (216/km²). The 93,918 housing units averaged 236 per square mile (91/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 87.46% White, 5.18% Black or African American, 0.53% Native American, 2.05% Asian, 0.26% Pacific Islander, 1.77% from other races, and 2.75% from two or more races. About 5.90% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. As of the census[15] of 2000, 23.3% were of German, 14.5% American, 11.0% English, 10.8% Irish, and 5.6% Italian ancestry.

Of the 72,558 households, 33.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.40% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.90% were not families. About 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the county, the population was distributed as 25.80% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 32.30% from 25 to 44, 22.30% from 45 to 64, and 10.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $48,347, and for a family was $56,772. Males had a median income of $40,148 versus $27,681 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,144. About 3.80% of families and 5.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.40% of those under age 18 and 5.50% of those age 65 or over.

Registered voters number 151,042.[16]

Education[edit]

Public schools[edit]

  • Excelsior Springs School District No. 40Excelsior Springs
    • Elkhorn Elementary School (K–5)
    • Lewis Elementary School (PK–5)
    • Westview Elementary School (K–5)
    • Excelsior Springs Middle School (6–8)
    • Excelsior Springs High School (9–12)
    • Excelsior Springs Technical High School (12) – Alternative/Technical School
  • Kearney R-I School DistrictKearney
    • Dogwood Elementary School (PreK–5)
    • Hawthorne Elementary School (K–5)
    • Holt Elementary School (K–5)
    • Kearney Elementary School (K–5)
    • Southview Elementary School (K–5)
    • Kearney Middle School (6–7)
    • Kearney Junior High School (8–9)
    • Kearney High School (10–12)
  • Liberty School District No. 53Liberty
    • Liberty Early Childhood Education Center (PreK)
    • Alexander Doniphan Elementary School (K–5)
    • Franklin Elementary School (K–5)
    • Kellybrook Elementary School (K–5) – Kansas City
    • Lewis & Clark Elementary School (K–5)
    • Liberty Oaks Elementary School (K–5) – Kansas City
    • Lillian Schumacher Elementary School (K–5)
    • Manor Hill Elementary School (K–5)
    • Ridgeview Elementary School (K–5)
    • Shoal Creek Elementary School (K–5)
    • Warren Hills Elementary School (K–5)
    • Liberty Middle School (6–8)
    • South Valley Middle School (6–8)
    • Heritage Middle School (6–8)
    • Discovery Middle School (6–8)
    • Liberty High School (9–12)
    • Liberty North High School (9–12)
  • Missouri City School District No. 56Missouri City
    • Missouri City Elementary School (K–8)
  • North Kansas City School District No. 74North Kansas City
    • Bell Prairie Elementary School (K–5)
    • Briarcliff Elementary School (K–5)
    • Chapel Hill Elementary School (K–5)
    • Chouteu Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Clardy Elementary School (2–5)
    • Crestview Elementary School (K–5)
    • Davidson Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Fox Hill Elementary School (K–5)
    • Gashland Elementary School (K–1)
    • Gracemor Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Lakewood Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Linden West Elementary School (K–5) – Gladstone
    • Maplewood Elementary School (K–5)
    • Meadowbrook Elementary School (K–5)
    • Nashua Elementary School (K–5)
    • Northview Elementary School (K–5)
    • Oakwood Manor Elementary School (K–5)
    • Ravenwood Elementary School (K–5)
    • Topping Elementary School (K–5)
    • West Englewood Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Winnwood Elementary School (Pre-K–5)
    • Antioch Middle School (6–8)
    • Eastgate Middle School (6–8)
    • Maple Park Middle School (6–8)
    • New Mark Middle School (6–8)
    • Northgate Middle School (6–8)
    • North Kansas City High School (9–12)
    • Oak Park High School (9–12)
    • Staley High School (9–12)
    • Winnetonka High School (9–12)
  • Smithville R-II School DistrictSmithville
    • Smithville Elementary School (Pre-K–2)
    • Smithville Upper Elementary School (3–5)
    • Smithville Middle School (6–8)
    • Smithville High School (9–12)

Private schools[edit]

Postsecondary[edit]

  • Maple Woods :: Metropolitan Community College—Kansas City—A public, two-year Liberal Arts college
  • William Jewell College – Liberty – A private, four-year Liberal Arts college.

Politics[edit]

Local[edit]

The three-person Clay County Commission oversees the issues of Clay County. The current makeup of the commissioners is two Republicans and one Democrat.

Clay County, Missouri
Elected countywide officials
Assessor Cathy Rinehart Democratic
Circuit Clerk Stephen Haymes Democratic
County Clerk Sheri Chapman Republican
Collector Lydia McEvoy Republican
Commissioner
(Presiding)
Pamela Mason Republican
Commissioner
(District 1)
Luann Ridgeway Republican
Commissioner
(District 2)
Gene Owen Democratic
Prosecuting Attorney Dan White Democratic
Public Administrator Debra L. Gwin Democratic
Recorder Jay Lawson Republican
Sheriff Paul Vescovo Republican
Treasurer Ted Graves Republican

State[edit]

Past Gubernatorial Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 48.97% 53,883 47.65% 52,429 3.37% 3,712
2012 41.53% 43,398 55.47% 57,962 3.00% 3,138
2008 38.64% 41,518 58.95% 63,341 2.40% 2,583
2004 46.70% 44,763 51.72% 49,573 1.58% 1,520
2000 46.57% 36,983 51.31% 40,747 2.12% 1,689
1996 34.29% 23,524 63.54% 43,593 2.18% 1,493

Clay County is divided into eight legislative districts in the Missouri House of Representatives, five of which are held by Republicans and three by Democrats.

Missouri House of Representatives — District 8 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican James W. (Jim) Neely 1,603 100.00% +25.52
Missouri House of Representatives — District 8 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican James W. (Jim) Neely 686 74.48% +9.46
Democratic Ted Rights 235 25.52% -9.46
Missouri House of Representatives — District 8 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican James W. (Jim) Neely 1,106 65.02%
Democratic James T. (Jim) Crenshaw 595 34.98%
  • District 12 — Kenneth Wilson (R— Smithville) — consists of Smithville, a part of Kansas City, and a part of Kearney.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 12 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenneth Wilson 8,930 60.90% -4.80
Democratic Sandy Van Wagner 5,307 36.19% +1.89
Libertarian Glenn Gustitus 427 2.91% +2.91
Missouri House of Representatives — District 12 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenneth Wilson 5,077 65.70% -34.30
Democratic Sandy Van Wagner 2,651 34.30% +34.30
Missouri House of Representatives — District 12 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kenneth Wilson 11,540 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 14 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kevin Corlew 211 45.87% -5.24
Democratic Martin T. Rucker II 249 54.13% +5.24
Missouri House of Representatives — District 14 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Kevin Corlew 92 51.11% -0.41
Democratic Stephanie Isaacson 88 48.89% +0.41
Missouri House of Representatives — District 14 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ron Scheiber 204 51.52%
Democratic Eric Pendell 192 48.48%
  • District 15 — Jon Carpenter (D—Kansas City) — consists of Gladstone, Oaks, Oakview, Oakwood, Oakwood Park, and a part of Kansas City.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 15 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Jon Carpenter 12,835 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 15 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Jon Carpenter 5,541 100.00% +43.83
Missouri House of Representatives — District 15 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Jon Carpenter 9,294 56.17%
Republican Kevin Corlew 7,251 43.83%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 16 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Noel J. Shull 16,969 100.00%
Missouri House of Representatives — District 16 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Noel J. Shull 7,010 100.00% +38.73
Missouri House of Representatives — District 16 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Noel J. Shull 11,290 61.27%
Democratic Jim Sweere 7,138 38.73%
  • District 17 — Mark Ellebracht (D— Liberty) — consists of the communities of Birmingham, Claycomo, Glenaire, a part of Kansas City, and a part of Liberty.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 17 — Clay County (2010)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mark Ellebracht 8,979 50.52% +0.92
Republican Mary Hill 8,146 45.83% -4.57
Libertarian Erik S. Buck 649 3.65% +3.65
Missouri House of Representatives — District 17 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mark Ellebracht 4,504 49.60% +0.22
Republican S. Nick King 4,576 50.40% -0.22
Missouri House of Representatives — District 17 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Mark Ellebracht 8,500 49.38%
Republican Myron Neth 8,713 50.62%
  • District 18 — Lauren Arthur (D— Kansas City) — consists of the communities of Avondale, part of Kansas City, and North Kansas City.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 18 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Lauren Arthur 12,734 100.00% +43.80
Missouri House of Representatives — District 18 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Lauren Arthur 4,284 56.20% -43.80
Republican Robert Rowland 3,339 43.80% +43.80
Missouri House of Representatives — District 18 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Jay Swearingen 12,694 100.00%
  • District 38 — T.J. Berry (R— Kearney) — consists of Excelsior Springs, part of Kansas City, part of Kearney, part of Liberty, Missouri City, Mosby, and Prathersville.
Missouri House of Representatives — District 38 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican T.J. Berry 13,391 77.03% -22.97
Libertarian Brian Lautenschlager 3,993 22.97% +22.97
Missouri House of Representatives — District 38 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican T.J. Berry 7,044 100.00% +40.65
Missouri House of Representatives — District 38 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican T.J. Berry 10,215 59.35%
Democratic Kevin Morgan 6,997 40.65%

Clay County is divided into two districts in the Missouri Senate, both of which are held by Republicans.

  • District 12 — Dan Hegeman (R-Cosby) -- consists of the communities of Excelsior Springs, Holt, Kearney, Lawson, Missouri City, Mosby, Prathersville, and Smithville.
Missouri Senate — Senate 12 — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Dan Hegeman 9,718 100.00%
  • District 17 – Ryan Silvey (R-Kansas City) - consists of the communities of Avondale, Birmingham, Claycomo, Gladstone, Glenaire, Liberty, North Kansas City, Oaks, Oakview, Oakwood, Oakwood Park, Pleasant Valley, Randolph, Sugar Creek, and a part of Kansas City.
Missouri Senate — District 17 — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Ryan Silvey 51,262 61.26% +8.47
Democratic J. Ranen Bechthold 32,422 38.74% -8.47
Missouri Senate — District 17 — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican 'Ryan Silvey 42,491 52.79%
Democratic Sandra Reeves 37,997 47.21%

Federal[edit]

U.S. Senate — Missouri — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Roy Blunt 49,173 44.66% +8.24
Democratic Jason Kander 55,322 50.25% -5.05
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 3,507 3.19% -5.09
Green Johnatan McFarland 1,197 1.09% +1.09
Constitution Fred Ryman 896 0.81% +0.81
U.S. Senate — Missouri — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Todd Akin 37,967 36.42%
Democratic Claire McCaskill 57,654 55.30%
Libertarian Jonathan Dine 8,631 8.28%

Clay County is split between the 5th and 6th congressional districts of Missouri. The southern 30% of the county is represented by Emanuel Cleaver (D-Kansas City).

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 5th Congressional District — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Emanuel Cleaver II 17,151 52.94% +8.73
Republican Jacob Turk 13,804 42.60% -7.67
Libertarian Roy Welborn 1,445 4.46% -1.06
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 5th Congressional District — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Emanuel Cleaver II 6,711 44.21% -10.50
Republican Jacob Turk 7,631 50.27% +8.99
Libertarian Roy Welborn 838 5.52% +1.51
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 5th Congressional District — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Emanuel Cleaver II 17,449 54.71%
Republican Jacob Turk 13,163 41.28%
Libertarian Randy Langkraehr 1,278 4.01%

The northern 70% of the county is represented by Sam Graves (R-Tarkio).

U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri’s 6th Congressional District — Clay County (2016)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sam Graves 47,760 63.14% -1.00
Democratic David M. Blackwell 25,056 33.12% +1.70
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil 1,943 2.57% -1.87
Green Mike Diel 886 1.17% +1.17
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 6th Congressional District — Clay County (2014)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sam Graves 23,092 64.14% +1.12
Democratic Bill Hedge 11,311 31.42% -3.05
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil 1,599 4.44% +1.93
U.S. House of Representatives — Missouri's 6th Congressional District — Clay County (2012)
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Sam Graves 44,573 63.02%
Democratic Kyle Yarber 24,385 34.47%
Libertarian Russ Lee Monchil 1,777 2.51%
Past Presidential Elections Results
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 52.17% 57,476 41.12% 45,304 6.71% 7,396
2012 52.99% 56,191 46.31% 47,310 2.40% 2,542
2008 49.55% 54,516 48.86% 53,761 1.59% 1,748
2004 53.07% 51,193 46.31% 44,670 0.62% 597
2000 48.75% 39,083 48.75% 39,084 2.50% 2,006
1996 41.85% 28,935 47.15% 32,603 11.00% 7,609

Communities[edit]

Notable natives[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Eaton, David Wolfe (1916). How Missouri Counties, Towns and Streams Were Named. The State Historical Society of Missouri. p. 277. 
  4. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 83. 
  5. ^ T. J. Stiles, Jesse James: The Last Rebel of the Civil War, New York: Vintage Books, 2003, pp.10-11
  6. ^ Jenson, Andrew. Encyclopedic History of the Church of Jesus-Christ of Latter-day Saints (Salt Lake City: Deseret News Press, 1941) p. 144-145
  7. ^ "Kansas City Missouri LDS (Mormon) Temple". Ldschurchtemples.com. Retrieved 2013-07-10. 
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. Retrieved November 14, 2014. 
  9. ^ "County Totals Dataset: Population, Population Change and Estimated Components of Population Change: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved November 14, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved November 14, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 14, 2014. 
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 14, 2014. 
  14. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ Registered Voters in Missouri 2008

Further reading[edit]

  • Woodson, W.H. History of Clay County, Missouri (1920) online

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°19′N 94°25′W / 39.31°N 94.42°W / 39.31; -94.42