Clearwater Cave System

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Clearwater Cave System
Interior of Clearwater Cave 2.jpg
Interior of the Clearwater Cave
LocationGunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak[1]
Length227.196 km (141.173 mi)[1]
Height variation553.41 m (1,815.6 ft)[1]
Discovery[2]
DifficultyAdvanced - connection to Wind Cave[3]
Intermediate - access to underground river[4]
AccessPublic (Clearwater cave),[5]
Restricted (underground rivers and connections)[4][3]
Show cave opened1985[6]
FeaturesTop 10 longest cave passage in the world[1]
WebsiteOfficial website
Mulu Caves Project website

The Clearwater Cave System (Malay: Gua Air Jernih) in Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia is believed to be the largest interconnected cave system in the world by volume and the 8th longest cave in the world at 222 km (138 mi) (2017).[7][8] The system lies mainly under the western margins of Gunung Api between the Melinau Gorge and Cave of the Winds.

The first exploration by speleologists was during the 1977/78 Royal Geographical Society Mulu Sarawak Expedition when 24 km (15 mi) of the cave passage were surveyed. Many expeditions by the Mulu Caves Project have increased the explored length and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Clearwater Cave". Mulu Caves Project. Archived from the original on 1 June 2017. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  2. ^ "The Clearwater Cave System". Mulu Caves Project. Archived from the original on 24 March 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Clearwater connection". Mulu National Park. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  4. ^ a b "Clearwater revival". Mulu National Park. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  5. ^ "Clearwater Cave and Wind Cave". Mulu National Park. Archived from the original on 20 September 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  6. ^ Yi Chuan, Shi (2010). "Gunung Mulu National Park". World Heritage Datasheet. Archived from the original on 27 October 2018. Retrieved 27 October 2018.
  7. ^ Eavis, Rob (April–May 2016). "What a Rollercoaster". Descent (249): 24–29.
  8. ^ Brown, Mark (June–July 2017). "Mulu Successes Continue". Descent (256): 36.

Gill.D.W.1999. World Heritage Nomination, Gunung Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia. Forest Department Sarawak.

Sources[edit]

  • Mulu Caves, Brook and Waltham (1979), Royal Geographical Society
  • Caves of Mulu '80, (1981), Eavis, Royal Geographical Society
  • Caves of Mulu '84, (1985), Eavis, British Cave Research Association
  • Mulu Caves '88 and '89 Expeditions, (1989), Kirby, Mulu Caves Project
  • Mulu Caves '91 (1991), Kirby, Mulu Caves Project

External links[edit]