Clement Laird Brumbaugh

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Clement Laird Brumbaugh
Clement L. Brumbaugh (1903).png
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Ohio's 12th district
In office
March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921
Preceded by Edward L. Taylor, Jr.
Succeeded by John C. Speaks
Member of the Ohio House of Representatives
from the Darke County district
In office
January 1, 1900 – January 3, 1904
Preceded by Charles W. Ludwick
Succeeded by A. H. Judy
Personal details
Born (1863-02-28)February 28, 1863
Darke County, Ohio
Died September 28, 1921(1921-09-28) (aged 58)
Columbus, Ohio
Political party Democratic
Alma mater National Normal University
Ohio Wesleyan University
Harvard University

Clement Laird Brumbaugh (February 28, 1863 – September 28, 1921) was a U.S. Representative from Ohio.

Biography[edit]

Born on a farm near Pikeville, in Darke County, Ohio, Brumbaugh attended the district schools and Greenville High School in Greenville, Ohio. He taught school, worked on a farm, and tutored. He was graduated from National Normal University, Lebanon, Ohio, in 1887. Founded and conducted the Van Buren Academy 1887-1891. He attended Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio from 1891 to 1893. He graduated from Harvard University in 1894. After this Brumbaugh taught school in Washington, D.C. from 1894 to 1896. Next he served as Superintendent of schools in Greenville, Ohio from 1896 to 1900. He was related to the infamous World War I aviator and barnstormer, Dr. David Brumbaugh. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1900 and commenced practice in Columbus, Ohio. He served as member of the State house of representatives 1900-1904, serving as minority leader.

Brumbaugh was elected as a Democrat to the Sixty-third and to the three succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1913-March 3, 1921). He served as chairman of the Committee on Railways and Canals (Sixty-fifth Congress). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1920. He lived in retirement in Columbus, Ohio, until his death there on September 28, 1921. He was interred in Greenville Union Cemetery in Greenville, Ohio.

Source[edit]

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.