Clerk of the Pipe

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The Clerk of the Pipe was a post in the Pipe Office of the English Exchequer and its successors. The incumbent was responsible for the pipe rolls on which the government income and expenditure was recorded as credits and debits.

The Dialogus de Scaccario or Dialogue concerning the Exchequer, written in about 1178, details the workings of the Exchequer and gives an early account of how the Pipe rolls were created. The Dialogue was written by Richard FitzNeal, the son of Nigel of Ely, who was Treasurer for both Henry I and Henry II of England.[1] According to the Dialogue, the Pipe rolls were the responsibility of the clerk of the Treasurer, who was also called the ingrosser of the great roll and, by 1547 at the latest, the Clerk of the Pipe.[2]

The Pipe Office was abolished in 1834.[3]

A similar post existed in Ireland and Scotland.

Clerks of the Pipe[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Warren Governance pp. 73–74
  2. ^ Chrimes Administrative History p. 60
  3. ^ "Pipe rolls entry Archived 2009-12-31 at the Wayback Machine" Websters Online Dictionary
  4. ^ "Parish Fraternity Register: Fraternity of the Holy Trinity and SS. Fabian and Sebastian (parish of St. Botolph without Aldersgate)". British History Online. Archived from the original on 21 July 2012. Retrieved 2 June 2017.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  5. ^ a b "SMITH, Christopher (by 1510-89), of London and Annables, Herts". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  6. ^ "MORLEY, John I (d.1587), of Halnaker, Suss. and St. Botolph-without-Aldersgate, London". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 11 May 2017.
  7. ^ "MORRISON, Thomas (d.1592), of Cadeby, Lincs. and St. Botolph-without-Aldersgate, London". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  8. ^ Goldring, Elizabeth. John Nichols's The Progresses and Public Processions of Queen Elizabeth. p. 489.
  9. ^ "STAFFORD, Sir Edward (c.1552-1605), of Cannon Row, Westminster". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  10. ^ "WOLLEY, Francis (1583-1609), of Pyrford, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  11. ^ "JARVIS, Arthur (1570-at least 1638), of Brentwood in South Weald, Essex and Cripplegate and Smithfield, London". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  12. ^ "MAINWARING, Sir Arthur (c.1580-1648), of Pyrford, Surr.; later of Sayes Park, Chertsey, Surr". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  13. ^ a b c "CROKE, Henry (1588-1660), of Hampton Poyle, Oxon. and Chequers, Ellesborough, Bucks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  14. ^ "CROKE, Robert (c.1636-71), of Chequers, Ellesborough, Bucks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  15. ^ "RUSSELL, Hon. Robert (c.1644-1703), of Covent Garden, Mdx". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  16. ^ a b "CHEYNE, Hon. William (1657-1728), of Chesham Bois, Bucks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  17. ^ https://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Cooke,_John_(1666-1710)_(DNB00)
  18. ^ "FARRER, William (?1656-1737), of Biddenham, Beds". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  19. ^ "CORNISH, Anthony (aft.1688-1728), of St. James's, Westminster". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  20. ^ "HENLEY, Henry Holt (d.1748), of Leigh, Som., and Colway, Lyme Regis, Dorset". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  21. ^ "CORBET, William (1702-48), of Stoke, Salop". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  22. ^ "ARUNDELL, Hon. Richard (c.1696-1758), of Allerton Mauleverer, Yorks". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  23. ^ "SHELLEY, John (?1730-83), of Mitchelgrove, Suss". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  24. ^ Taylor, Charles. The Literary Panorama, Volume 10. p. 1411.