Cliff Heathcote

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Cliff Heathcote
Cliff Heathcote 1918.jpeg
Outfielder
Born: (1898-01-24)January 24, 1898
Glen Rock, Pennsylvania
Died: January 18, 1939(1939-01-18) (aged 40)
York, Pennsylvania
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 4, 1918, for the St. Louis Cardinals
Last MLB appearance
September 24, 1932, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.275
Home runs42
Runs batted in448
Teams

Clifton Earl Heathcote (January 24, 1898 – January 18, 1939) was a center fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the St. Louis Cardinals (1918–1922), Chicago Cubs (1922–1930), Cincinnati Reds (1931–1932) and Philadelphia Phillies (1932).

Heathcote batted and threw left-handed; in a 15-season career, Heathcote posted a .275 batting average with 42 home runs, 448 RBI, and 191 stolen bases in 1415 games played. He was born in Glen Rock, Pennsylvania, and died in York, Pennsylvania, at age 40 from a pulmonary embolism.

Highlights[edit]

  • Hit for the cycle on June 13, 1918.[1]
  • On May 30, 1922, the Cardinals were playing a Memorial Day doubleheader at Cubs Park. Between games, Heathcote was traded for Max Flack. Both men appeared in both games that day.[2][3]
  • On August 25, 1922, when the Cubs and the Philadelphia Phillies played to a 26–23 Cubs win, Heathcote set a modern National League record by reaching base seven times in a nine-inning game, and set the record (which has since been surpassed) for most runs scored in a single major league game. He went 5-for-5 that day, while scoring five runs.[4]
  • 1926: 10 HR, 98 runs, 141 hits, and 33 doubles in 139 games – all career-highs.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 8, St. Louis Cardinals 8". Retrosheet. June 13, 1918.
  2. ^ "Chicago Cubs 4, St. Louis Cardinals 1 (1)". Retrosheet. May 30, 1922.
  3. ^ "Chicago Cubs 3, St. Louis Cardinals 1 (2)". Retrosheet. May 30, 1922.
  4. ^ "Chicago Cubs 26, Philadelphia Phillies 23". Retrosheet. August 25, 1922.

External links[edit]

Achievements
Preceded by
Heinie Groh
Hitting for the cycle
June 13, 1918
Succeeded by
George Sisler