Clifford Wells

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Clifford Wells
Clifford Wells (Tulane).jpg
Wells pictured in Jambalaya 1950, Tulane yearbook
Sport(s)Basketball
Biographical details
Born(1896-03-17)March 17, 1896
Indianapolis, Indiana
DiedAugust 15, 1977(1977-08-15) (aged 81)
Garland, Texas
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1917–1921Bloomington HS (IN)
1921–1922Columbus HS (IN)
1922–1945Logansport HS (IN)
1945–1963Tulane
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1963–1966Basketball HOF (director)
Head coaching record
Overall254–171 (college)
Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1972 (profile)
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

W. R. Clifford "Cliff" Wells (March 17, 1896 – August 15, 1977) was an American basketball coach and administrator. As a high school basketball coach in Indiana he led his teams to winning more than 50 tournaments, including two Indiana state championships in 1919 and 1934. He also coached the Tulane University team from 1945 to 1963. He was the first full-time executive secretary and director of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, serving from 1963 to 1966. He was enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame as a contributor in 1972. Wells died on August 15, 1977, of an apparent heart attack, at his home in Garland, Texas.[1]

Head coaching record[edit]

College[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Tulane Green Wave (Southeastern Conference) (1945–1963)
1945–46 Tulane 15–7 4–5 8th
1946–47 Tulane 22–9 8–5 5th
1947–48 Tulane 23–3 13–1 2nd
1948–49 Tulane 24–4 12–3 2nd
1949–50 Tulane 15–7 8–4 T–3rd
1950–51 Tulane 12–12 8–6 4th
1951–52 Tulane 12–12 7–7 T–6th
1952–53 Tulane 12–6 9–4 2nd
1953–54 Tulane 15–8 10–4 T–3rd
1954–55 Tulane 14–6 9–5 T–3rd
1955–56 Tulane 12–12 7–7 5th
1956–57 Tulane 15–9 9–5 T–3rd
1957–58 Tulane 8–16 3–11 T–10th
1958–59 Tulane 13–11 6–8 T–7th
1959–60 Tulane 13–11 8–6 T–4th
1960–61 Tulane 11–13 6–8 T–6th
1961–62 Tulane 12–10 6–8 T–6th
1962–63 Tulane 6–16 4–10 T–10th
Tulane: 254–171 137–107
Total: 254–171

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Former Tulane coach dies". Democrat and Chronicle. Rochester, New York. Associated Press. August 16, 1977. p. 44. Retrieved June 12, 2018 – via Newspapers.com open access publication – free to read.

External links[edit]