Climate Museum

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The Climate Museum
Climate Museum logo.jpg
EstablishedJuly 2015 (2015-07)
LocationNew York City (not yet constructed)
Coordinates40°45′20″N 73°58′17″W / 40.755658°N 73.971375°W / 40.755658; -73.971375Coordinates: 40°45′20″N 73°58′17″W / 40.755658°N 73.971375°W / 40.755658; -73.971375
DirectorMiranda Massie
Websitewww.climatemuseum.org

The Climate Museum is a nonprofit organization in New York City and the first museum dedicated to climate change and climate solutions in the United States.[1][2] Its mission is "to employ the sciences, art, and design to inspire dialogue and innovation that address the challenges of climate change, moving solutions to the center of our shared public life and catalyzing broad community engagement.”[3]

History[edit]

The Climate Museum initiative was conceived of in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy.[4] Climate Museum founder and director Miranda Massie was at the time serving as the Interim Director of the New York Lawyers for the Public Interest (NYLPI).[5] Her work in civil rights led her to see climate change through the lens of social activism.[6] Massie left NYLPI in March 2014 to found the Climate Museum Launch Project.[7][8][9] The Museum was granted a five-year charter by the State of New York in July 2015, and received 501(c)3 nonprofit status in February 2016.[10][11]

Programming[edit]

The Climate Museum’s first exhibition, In Human Time, was presented at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center at Parsons School of Design, The New School from December 2017 to February 2018.[12] It explored intersections of polar ice, humanity, and time through installations of work by artists Zaria Forman and Peggy Weil.[13][14][15]

In September 2018, the Climate Museum launched the citywide, outdoor public art installation Climate Signals by Justin Brice Guariglia.[16] This installation ran through November 2018 and consisted of 10 solar-powered highway signs in New York City parks across all five boroughs, programmed to flash messages about climate in five languages at passersby. It was presented in partnership with the NYC Mayor’s Office Climate Policy and Programs.[17] The exhibition received press attention.[18][19][20][21]

From September 2018 to October 2018, the Climate Museum operated its first temporary space on Governors Island at the Admiral’s House.[22] The space included the exhibition Climate Changers of New York, a portrait exhibition by David Noles presented in partnership with the NYC Climate Action Alliance, and a digital interactive activity, “Create Your Own Climate Signal.” Throughout Fall 2018, the Climate Museum offered programming in the arts, science education, community engagement, as well as screenings, panels and talks.[23][24][25]

From March to June 2019, in partnership with the NYC Department of Education's (DOE) Office of Sustainability, the Climate Museum offered a citywide spoken word program for high school students called Climate Speaks, a series of workshops and rehearsals dedicated to the climate crisis that culminated in a final performance at the Apollo Theater on June 14, 2019.[26][27]

Taking Action is the Climate Museum’s second exhibition on Governors Island and runs from June to October 2019. Through interactive installations and on-site guidance, visitors are invited to learn about clean energy and other mitigation strategies, the obstacles in our transition to a carbon-free economy and culture, and the importance of collective action. A series of special events including panels and workshops will take place throughout the exhibition’s duration.[28]

The Climate Museum is part of the Museums and Climate Change Working Group, a coalition of museums around the world working to incorporate climate change into their exhibitions and programming.[29]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Lawyer Quit Her Job to Start a Climate Museum in New York". The New York Times. 2015-08-21. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  2. ^ "A Trip to a Museum for Convincing Americans About Climate Change". The Atlantic. 2018-02-05. ISSN 0276-9077. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  3. ^ "About the Climate Museum".
  4. ^ "A Lawyer Quit Her Job to Start a Climate Museum in New York". The New York Times. 2015-08-21. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  5. ^ "Miranda Massie". Linkedin.
  6. ^ Degroot, Dagomar (June 1, 2015). "A Conversation with Miranda Massie". Historical Climatology. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  7. ^ "A Lawyer Quit Her Job to Start a Climate Museum in New York". The New York Times. 2015-08-21. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  8. ^ "The Museum of the Future Looks to Heal the Planet | The Takeaway | WNYC". WNYC. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  9. ^ Tabary, Zoe. "From ghost boats to water treasures, museums seek to spur climate..." U.S. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  10. ^ Laguerre-Wilkinson, Magalie (October 18, 2017). "Miranda Massie on the Impacts of Climate Change and New York's Climate Museum". Carnegie Council of Ethics in International Affairs. Retrieved October 25, 2017.
  11. ^ Karvelas, Patricia (July 17, 2017). "Museums in the age of climate change". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  12. ^ "In Human Time".
  13. ^ "As the World Melts, an Artist Finds Beauty in Ancient Ice". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  14. ^ Raskin, Laura. "A Trip to a Museum for Convincing Americans About Climate Change". The Atlantic. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  15. ^ "The Climate Museum Captures the Gravity of a Global Crisis". Hyperallergic. 2018-02-09. Retrieved 2018-05-28.
  16. ^ "Climate Signals".
  17. ^ "Climate Museum Sends Distress Signals to Stimulate Discussion". The New York Times. 2018-08-30. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  18. ^ "Climate Museum Sends Distress Signals to Stimulate Discussion". The New York Times. 2018-08-30. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  19. ^ "Signs of climate change pop up in New York — really". The Washington Post. 2018-09-07. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  20. ^ "'Art can play a valuable role': climate change installations appear in New York". The Guardian. 2018-09-04. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  21. ^ "Ask a Scientist: How to Deal with a Climate-Change Skeptic". The New Yorker. 2018-11-17. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  22. ^ "The Climate Museum Hub".
  23. ^ "Ask a Scientist: How to Deal with a Climate-Change Skeptic". The New Yorker. 2018-11-17. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  24. ^ "South Bronx teens get creative about climate change". Grist. 2018-10-23. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  25. ^ "Queens Museum hosts 'A Call for Climate Action' on Saturday". QNS. 2018-10-18. Retrieved 2019-01-16.
  26. ^ Graeber, Laurel (2019-06-13). "7 Things to Do With Your Kids in N.Y.C. This Weekend". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-06-26.
  27. ^ "There's a new act at New York's Apollo Theater: Climate change". Grist. 2019-06-14. Retrieved 2019-06-26.
  28. ^ "Taking Action". Climate Museum. Retrieved 2019-06-26.
  29. ^ "Museums & Climate Change: A Global Response – American Alliance of Museums". www.aam-us.org. Retrieved 2018-08-17.

External links[edit]