Clinton County, Kentucky

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Clinton County, Kentucky
Clinton County Kentucky courthouse.jpg
Clinton County courthouse in Albany
Map of Kentucky highlighting Clinton County
Location in the U.S. state of Kentucky
Map of the United States highlighting Kentucky
Kentucky's location in the U.S.
Founded February 20, 1835
Named for DeWitt Clinton
Seat Albany
Largest city Albany
Area
 • Total 205 sq mi (531 km2)
 • Land 197 sq mi (510 km2)
 • Water 8.2 sq mi (21 km2), 4.0%
Population
 • (2010) 10,272
 • Density 52/sq mi (20/km²)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website clintoncounty.ky.gov

Clinton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Kentucky. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,272.[1] Its county seat is Albany.[2] The county was formed in 1835 and named for DeWitt Clinton, the seventh Governor of New York.[3] It is a prohibition or dry county.

History[edit]

Clinton County was formed on February 20, 1835 from portions of Cumberland and Wayne counties. It was named for DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York and driving force behind the Erie Canal.[4]

Courthouse fires in 1864 and 1980 resulted in the destruction of county records.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 205 square miles (530 km2), of which 197 square miles (510 km2) is land and 8.2 square miles (21 km2) (4.0%) is water.[6]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1840 3,863
1850 4,889 26.6%
1860 5,781 18.2%
1870 6,497 12.4%
1880 7,212 11.0%
1890 7,047 −2.3%
1900 7,871 11.7%
1910 8,153 3.6%
1920 8,589 5.3%
1930 9,004 4.8%
1940 10,279 14.2%
1950 10,650 3.6%
1960 8,886 −16.6%
1970 8,174 −8.0%
1980 9,321 14.0%
1990 9,135 −2.0%
2000 9,634 5.5%
2010 10,272 6.6%
Est. 2016 10,177 [7] −0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
1790-1960[9] 1900-1990[10]
1990-2000[11] 2010-2013[1]

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 9,634 people, 4,086 households, and 2,811 families residing in the county. The population density was 49 per square mile (19/km2). There were 4,888 housing units at an average density of 25 per square mile (9.7/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 99.09% White, 0.10% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.04% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.32% from two or more races. 1.22% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,086 households out of which 29.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.50% were married couples living together, 9.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 28.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.80% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.85.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.70% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 26.00% from 45 to 64, and 15.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.50 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $19,563, and the median income for a family was $25,919. Males had a median income of $21,193 versus $16,194 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,286. About 20.20% of families and 25.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.80% of those under age 18 and 29.90% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

In presidential elections Clinton County has been overwhelmingly Republican ever since Reconstruction ended. Its Republican sympathies are rooted in the fact that, relative to population, Clinton County provided more soldiers for the Union Army than any free state,[13] and saw a proportion of its population volunteer for Union service only exceeded by the equally rock-ribbed Republican Owsley County.[14]

The last Democrat to carry Clinton County was Horatio Seymour in 1868 – when the state was largely controlled by former Confederates – and since at least 1896 no Democrat has reached thirty percent of the county’s vote. Nor has any Republican – even William Howard Taft during the divided 1912 election – fallen short of sixty percent. Only Jackson County to the northeast has also seen no Democrat reach thirty percent during the twentieth century.

Presidential elections results[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 85.4% 3,809 12.3% 547 2.4% 106
2012 81.2% 3,569 17.1% 752 1.6% 72
2008 80.7% 3,366 18.2% 761 1.1% 45
2004 77.4% 3,369 21.9% 952 0.7% 31
2000 74.9% 3,224 24.0% 1,032 1.1% 49
1996 63.4% 2,521 27.0% 1,072 9.6% 383
1992 63.8% 2,830 28.0% 1,241 8.2% 365
1988 77.8% 3,248 21.5% 899 0.7% 28
1984 80.0% 3,459 19.4% 838 0.6% 25
1980 77.1% 3,539 21.8% 1,000 1.1% 51
1976 69.5% 2,354 29.1% 987 1.4% 48
1972 79.6% 2,632 19.9% 659 0.5% 16
1968 75.1% 2,572 16.6% 568 8.3% 285
1964 69.8% 994 29.5% 2,351 0.7% 24
1960 84.1% 3,524 15.9% 666 0.0% 0
1956 81.9% 3,396 18.0% 747 0.1% 4
1952 80.5% 2,856 19.1% 678 0.3% 12
1948 74.2% 2,295 22.9% 709 2.9% 88
1944 82.2% 2,618 17.7% 564 0.1% 3
1940 77.3% 2,573 22.7% 755 0.0% 0
1936 75.4% 2,147 24.6% 701 0.0% 0
1932 72.7% 2,422 27.3% 908 0.0% 0
1928 88.8% 2,580 11.2% 325 0.0% 0
1924 78.7% 2,069 20.7% 543 0.7% 17
1920 84.2% 2,356 15.4% 431 0.4% 11
1916 76.2% 1,260 22.9% 379 0.9% 14
1912 65.3% 828 24.4% 310 10.3% 131

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved March 6, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "Clinton County". The Kentucky Encyclopedia. 2000. Retrieved August 21, 2014. 
  4. ^ The Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Volume 1. Kentucky State Historical Society. 1903. p. 34. 
  5. ^ Hogan, Roseann Reinemuth (1992). Kentucky Ancestry: A Guide to Genealogical and Historical Research. Ancestry Publishing. p. 219. Retrieved July 26, 2013. 
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved August 13, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved August 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 13, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 13, 2014. 
  12. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved January 31, 2008. 
  13. ^ Marshall, Anne E.; Creating a Confederate Kentucky: The Lost Cause and Civil War Memory in a Border State, pp. 114-115 ISBN 1469609835
  14. ^ Copeland, James E.; ‘Where Were the Kentucky Unionists and Secessionists’; The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, volume 71, no. 4 (October 1973), pp. 344–363
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". USElectionAtlas.org. Retrieved July 29, 2017. 

Coordinates: 36°43′N 85°08′W / 36.72°N 85.13°W / 36.72; -85.13