Clymene (mythology)

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In Greek mythology, the name Clymene or Klymene (/ˈklɪmnˌˈklmn/;[1][2] Ancient Greek: Κλυμένη) may refer to:

  1. Clymene, an Oceanid,[3] wife of the Titan Iapetus, and mother of Atlas, Epimetheus, Prometheus, and Menoetius;[4] other authors relate the same of her sister Asia.[5] A less common genealogy makes Clymene the mother of Deucalion by Prometheus.[6][7] The Oceanid Clymene is also given as the wife to King Merops of Ethiopia and, by Helios, mother of Phaëton and the Heliades.[8][9][10]
  2. Clymene, a Nereid.[11][12][13]
  3. Clymene, an Amazon.[14]
  4. Clymene, an "ox-eyed" servant of Helen.[15] She was a daughter of Aethra[16] by Hippalces,[17] thus half-sister to Theseus and a distant relative to Menelaus.[18] She and her mother were taken by Helen to Troy as handmaidens, and were released by Acamas and Demophon after the fall of Troy.[19]
  5. Clymene, daughter of Catreus. She and her sister Aerope were given to Nauplius to be sold away, as Catreus feared the possibility of being killed by one of his children. Nauplius took Clymene to wife, and by him she became mother of Palamedes, Oeax and Nausimedon.[20]
  6. Clymene, daughter of Minyas, wife of either Cephalus[21] or Phylacus,[22] and mother of Iphiclus and Alcimede.[23] Some sources call her Periclymene[24] or Eteoclymene,[25] while according to others, Periclymene and Eteoclymene were the names of her sisters.[26] Alternately, this Clymene was the wife of Iasus and mother by him of Atalanta.[27]
  7. Clymene, wife of Merops of Miletus, and mother of Pandareus.
  8. Clymene, possible mother of Myrtilus by Hermes.[28]
  9. Clymene, a nymph, mother of Tlesimenes by Parthenopaeus.[29]
  10. Clymene, one of the Trojan women taken captive at the end of the Trojan War.[30] She might or might not be the same as the servant of Helen mentioned above.
  11. Clymene and Dictys were honored in Athens as the saviors of Perseus and had an altar dedicated to them.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russell, William F. (1989). Classic myths to read aloud. New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 9780307774439. 
  2. ^ Barchers, Suzanne I. (2001). From Atalanta to Zeus : readers theatre from Greek mythology. Englewood, Colo.: Teacher Ideas Press. p. 192. ISBN 9781563088155. 
  3. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 351
  4. ^ Hesiod, Theogony, 508; Hyginus, Fabulae, Preface
  5. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 2. 3
  6. ^ Scholia on Pindar, Olympian Ode 9. 81; on Odyssey, 10. 2
  7. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 1. 17. 3
  8. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4. 204
  9. ^ Servius on Aeneid, 10.
  10. ^ Strabo, Geography, 1. 2. 27, citing Euripides
  11. ^ Homer, Iliad, 18. 47
  12. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, Preface
  13. ^ Virgil, Georgics, 4. 345
  14. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 163
  15. ^ Homer, Iliad, 3. 144
  16. ^ Dictys Cretensis, 5. 13
  17. ^ Scholia on Iliad, 3. 144
  18. ^ Dictys Cretensis, 1. 5. Atreus, the father of Menelaus, and Pittheus, the father of Aethra, were brothers.
  19. ^ Dictys Cretensis, 6. 2
  20. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. 2. 2; Epitome of Book 4, 6. 8; also 2. 1. 5 for Nausimedon
  21. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10. 29. 6
  22. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 45; on Odyssey, 11. 326
  23. ^ Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 45 - 47 & 233
  24. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 14
  25. ^ Stesichorus, fragment 45
  26. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 230
  27. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 3. 9. 2
  28. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 752
  29. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae, 71
  30. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10. 26 1 with reference to Stesichorus, The Sack of Troy
  31. ^ Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2. 18. 1