Coalició Compromís

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Commitment Coalition
  • Coalició Compromís
Leaders Mònica Oltra
Enric Morera
Depute leader Fran Ferri
Joan Baldoví
Founded January 25, 2010 (2010-01-25)
Merger of
Headquarters Plaça del Pilar, 1
46001 Valencia
Youth wing Joves PV-Compromís
Joves amb Iniciativa
Joves Verds Equo
Membership  (2015) Increase 11,534[1]
Ideology
Political position Left-wing
European affiliation European Free Alliance
European Green Party
European Parliament group Greens/EFA
Colours      Orange
Anthem
European Parliament
(Spanish seats)
1 / 54
Within 'European Spring' coalition.
Congress
(Valencian seats)
4 / 33
Inside És el moment coalition
Senate
(Valencian seats)
2 / 18
1 inside És el moment coalition, 1 designated by the Corts Valencianes.
Valencian Parliament
19 / 99
Town councillors
737 / 5,784
Local governments (June 2015)
72 / 542
Website
www.compromis.net

Coalició Compromís (Valencian pronunciation: [koalisiˈo kompɾoˈmis]; English: Commitment Coalition) is a Valencianist political party, originally an electoral coalition, in Valencia, Spain. The parties involved include the Valencian Nationalist Bloc, the left-wing Valencian People's Initiative, and a group of environmentalist (Greens Equo of the Valencian Country) and independent parties. Together they defend Valencianist, progressive and ecological politics.

Compromís was founded in January 2010 to participate in the 2011 elections to the Valencian parliament, and the 2011 local elections.

Since the 2015 election year, Compromís has significantly increased its representation in many institutions. At present it has 722 councillors all over the Valencian Country, 19 parliamentary representatives in the Valencian parliament (Corts Valencianes), 4 representatives in the Congress of Deputies of Spain (within 9 representatives of A la valenciana coalition), 2 in the Spanish Senate and 1 in the European parliament. It also has 6 representatives in the Deputation of Valencia (València), 2 in Castellón (Castelló), 3 in Alicante (Alacant) and 84 mayor's offices, among them, the city of Valencia.

History[edit]

In the 2011 elections to the Valencian parliament Compromís received 176.213 votes (7% of the votes) and 6 of the 99 seats.

In the 2011 elections to the Spanish parliament, standing as Compromís-Q (they ran in coalition with Equo, in the three Valencian provinces) it won 0.5% of the national vote and 1 MP in Congress (Joan Baldoví), nearing 5% of the total vote in the Valencian Country.

In the elections to the European Parliament of 2014 got 1 seat in Primavera Europea (European Spring) coalition with other parties (such as Chunta Aragonesista or EQUO).

In the 2015 Valencian parliamentary election, Compromís was the third most voted party, after the People's Party (PP) and the Valencian Socialists (PSPV). Compromís got 456.823 votes (18.5% of the votes) and 19 of the 99 seats. The election results possibilitied a new government formed by Compromís and PSPV, with the parliamentary support of Podemos. After the negotiations, Mònica Oltra from Compromís was elected as Vice president of Generalitat Valenciana and Ximo Puig from PSPV as President.

For the 2015 Spanish general election, Compromís formed a coalition with Podemos, called Compromís-Podem-És el moment. This new coalition was the second most voted political force in the Valencian Country, surpassing the PSPV. They received 671.071 votes, 25,09% of the total vote in the Valencian Country. During the process of creating parliamentary groups, Podemos deputies joined the group within other Podemos deputies from all around Spain, while Compromís joined the Mixed Group.

In the 2016 general elections in Spain Compromís ran again in a coalition with Podemos, but this time the coalition included as well United Left of the Valencian Country, the Valencian branch of United Left.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "El censo para las primarias de Compromís se cierra con más de 40.000 personas inscritas". 15 June 2015. Retrieved 11 August 2015. 
  2. ^ "Manifest de la Coalició Compromís". 27 February 2010. Retrieved 8 June 2011. 

External links[edit]