Coat of arms of Belize

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Coat of arms of Belize
Coat of arms of Belize.svg
ArmigerElizabeth II in Right of Belize
Adopted1981
CrestA mahogany tree proper
BlazonPer chevron and in chief per pale, argent, or and azure, in the dexter chief a squaring axe in bend sinister surmounted by a paddle in bend; on the sinister chief a beating axe in bend surmounted by a saw in bend sinister; and in base on waves of the sea a ship in full sail, all proper
SupportersDexter, a Creole proper, breeches argent, holding over his shoulder in his dexter hand a beating axe as in the arms; sinister, a Negro holding over his shoulder in his sinister hand a paddle as in the arms[1]
MottoSUB UMBRA FLOREO
"Under the shade I flourish"
Earlier version(s)Full Arms of British Honduras.svg
British Honduras
Use1907-1981

The coat of arms or national seal of Belize was adopted upon independence, and the current coat of arms is only slightly different from that used when Belize was a British colony (the Union Jack has been removed, and a Creole has replaced one of the supporting Negroes).[2]

The circular border of the coat is formed by fifty leaves. Within the circle is a mahogany tree, in front of which is a shield tierced per pall inverted. Within the shield are the tools of a woodcutter in the upper sections and a ship in the lower one. These are symbolic of the importance of mahogany in the 18th- and 19th-century Belizean economy.[3]

The shield is supported by two men of different shades of brown. The one on the left is holding an axe, while the one on the right is holding an oar. Again the importance of the mahogany and its importance to boat building are represented. At the bottom is the national motto: SUB UMBRA FLOREO ("Under the shade I flourish").

The flag of Belize features the coat of arms in its centre.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox-Davies, Charles (1915). The Book of Public Arms. London: TC & EC Jack.
  2. ^ Arms of BELIZE - Heraldry of the World. Retrieved 10 March 2012.
  3. ^ "The National Symbols". Government of Belize. Retrieved 13 October 2013.