Cobalt(II,III) oxide

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Cobalt(II,III) oxide[1]
Cobalt(II,III) oxide
Ball-and-stick model of the unit cell of Co3O4
Names
IUPAC name
cobalt(II) dicobalt(III) oxide
Other names
cobalt oxide, cobalt(II,III) oxide, cobaltosic oxide, tricobalt tetroxide
Identifiers
  • 1308-06-1 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.013.780 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 215-157-2
RTECS number
  • GG2500000
UNII
  • InChI=1S/3Co.4O checkY
    Key: LBFUKZWYPLNNJC-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/3Co.4O/rCo2O3.CoO/c3-1-5-2-4;1-2
    Key: LBFUKZWYPLNNJC-PMPQCLQHAA
  • [Co]=O.O=[Co]O[Co]=O
Properties
Co3O4

CoO.Co2O3

Molar mass 240.80 g/mol
Appearance black solid
Density 6.07 g/cm3[2]
Melting point 895 °C (1,643 °F; 1,168 K)
Boiling point 900 °C (1,650 °F; 1,170 K) (decomposes)
Insoluble
Solubility soluble (with degradation) in acids and alkalis
+7380·10−6 cm3/mol
Structure
cubic
Fd3m, No. 227[3]
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS09: Environmental hazardGHS08: Health hazard
GHS Signal word Danger
H317, H334, H350, H411
P261, P273, P284, P304+340, P342+311
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
2
0
0
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Cobalt(II,III) oxide is an inorganic compound with the formula Co3O4. It is one of two well characterized cobalt oxides. It is a black antiferromagnetic solid. As a mixed valence compound, its formula is sometimes written as CoIICoIII2O4 and sometimes as CoO•Co2O3.[4]

Structure[edit]

Co3O4 adopts the normal spinel structure, with Co2+ ions in tetrahedral interstices and Co3+ ions in the octahedral interstices of the cubic close-packed lattice of oxide anions.[4]

Cobalt(II,III)-oxide-xtal-2006-Co(II)-coord-CM-3D-balls.png Cobalt(II,III)-oxide-xtal-2006-Co(III)-coord-CM-3D-balls.png Cobalt(II,III)-oxide-xtal-2006-O-coord-CM-3D-balls.png
tetrahedral coordination geometry of Co(II) distorted octahedral coordination geometry of Co(III) distorted tetrahedral coordination geometry of O

Synthesis[edit]

Cobalt(II) oxide, CoO, converts to Co3O4 upon heating at around 600–700 °C in air.[4] Above 900 °C, CoO is stable.[4][5] These reaction are described by the following equilibrium:

2 Co3O4 ⇌ 6 CoO + O2

Applications[edit]

Cobalt(II,III) oxide is used as a blue coloring agent for pottery enamel and glass, as an alternative to cobalt(II) oxide.[6]

Cobalt(II,III) oxide is used as an electrode in some lithium-ion batteries, possibly in the form of cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

Safety[edit]

Cobalt compounds are potentially poisonous in large amounts.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cobalt(II,III) oxide 203114". Sigma-Aldrich.
  2. ^ Lide, David R., ed. (2006). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87th ed.). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press. ISBN 0-8493-0487-3.
  3. ^ "mp-18748: Co3O4 (cubic, Fd-3m, 227)". materialsproject.org. Retrieved 2019-12-20.
  4. ^ a b c d Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 1118. ISBN 978-0-08-037941-8.
  5. ^ Handbook of Preparative Inorganic Chemistry, 2nd Ed. Edited by G. Brauer, Academic Press, 1963, NY. p. 1520.
  6. ^ Frank Hamer, Janet Hamer (2004): The Potter's Dictionary of Materials and Techniques. University of Pennsylvania Press; 437 pp. ISBN 0812238109
  7. ^ MSDS[permanent dead link]