Cobalt railway station

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Cobalt
Cobalt Railway Station (7183628624) (cropped).jpg
The station in 2012.
Location 22 Lang Street,
Cobalt, ON
Coordinates 47°23′46″N 79°41′03″W / 47.39611°N 79.68417°W / 47.39611; -79.68417Coordinates: 47°23′46″N 79°41′03″W / 47.39611°N 79.68417°W / 47.39611; -79.68417
Owned by Ontario Northland Railway
Construction
Architect John M. Lyle
History
Opened 1910
Closed 2012
Services
  Former services  
Preceding station   Ontario Northland Railway   Following station
toward Cochrane
Northlander
toward Toronto
Official name Cobalt O.N.R. Station
Designated 1983
Reference no. 10423

The Cobalt Railway Station is a former train station located in the town of Cobalt in Ontario, and was a stop for Ontario Northland's Northlander trains.

The station itself is occupied by the offices of the Historic Cobalt Corporation and the Bunker Military Museum; passengers had to wait outside to flag down the train and purchase tickets once aboard.

Architecture[edit]

The station was designed by the prominent Canadian architect John M. Lyle and constructed in 1910 for the Timiskaming and Northern Ontario Railway.[1] It is a long and low 1 12-storey brick structure, with an overhanging hipped roof which is gently curved. The roof contains pedimented dormers, with a central block Flemish gable that breaks the roofline and emphasizes the main entrance.

The dormers were to allow natural light to penetrate the waiting rooms. Waiting rooms were designed with exposed red brick walls, with several courses of dark brick to unify the large interior spaces horizontally.[2] The interior features a wooden ceiling with massive timber roof trusses.

The Town of Cobalt designated the station under the Ontario Heritage Act in 1979 and the Ontario Heritage Trust secured a heritage easement on the building in 1993.[1]

Passenger train service to this station ceased in September 2012, and was replaced by bus service between Cochrane and Toronto.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.heritagefdn.on.ca/userfiles/HTML/nts_1_8872_1.html
  2. ^ Geoffrey Hunt. John M. Lyle: Towards a Canadian Architecture. Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 1982. ISBN 0-88911-029-8, p. 75.

External links[edit]