Coccothraustes

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Coccothraustes
Coccothraustes coccothraustes 1 (Marek Szczepanek).jpg
Hawfinch
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Passeriformes
Suborder: Passeri
Infraorder: Passerida
Superfamily: Passeroidea
Family: Fringillidae
Subfamily: Carduelinae
Genus: Coccothraustes
Brisson, 1760

Coccothraustes is a genus of the finch family (Fringillidae) that contains a single species:[1]

  • HawfinchCoccothraustes coccothraustes

The name of the genus Coccothraustes was introduced by the French zoologist Mathurin Jacques Brisson in 1760 based on tautonymy and the binomial name Loxia coccothraustes of Carl Linnaeus.[2][3][4]

The hawfinch (Coccothraustes coccothraustes) has long been recognised as being closely related to other grosbeaks in the genera Mycerobas, Hesperiphona and Eophona. This was confirmed by molecular genetic studies that showed that the four genera form a well-defined clade.[5] Some authorities have grouped all the species into a single large Coccothraustes genus but this is usually split.[6] Clements and colleagues include the evening grosbeak and the hooded grosbeak in Coccothraustes[7] but the International Ornithologists' Union retain only the hawfinch in the genus.[1]

Molecular genetic studies have shown the finches with large beaks in the Chaunoproctus, Rhynchostruthus and Neospiza genera are not closely related. The similar bill morphology is the result of convergent evolution due to the similar feeding behaviour.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gill, Frank; Donsker, David (eds.). "Finches, euphonias". World Bird List Version 5.2. International Ornithologists' Union. Retrieved 5 June 2015. 
  2. ^ Paynter, Raymond A. Jnr., ed. (1968). Check-list of birds of the world, Volume 14. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Museum of Comparative Zoology. p. 299. 
  3. ^ Brisson, Mathurin Jacques (1760). Ornithologie, Volume 1 (in French). Paris: Chez C.J.-B. Bauche. p. 36. 
  4. ^ Brisson, Mathurin Jacques (1760). Ornithologie, Volume 3 (in French). Paris: Chez C.J.-B. Bauche. p. 218. 
  5. ^ a b Zuccon, Dario; Prŷs-Jones, Robert; Rasmussen, Pamela C.; Ericson, Per G.P. (2012). "The phylogenetic relationships and generic limits of finches (Fringillidae)" (PDF). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 62 (2): 581–596. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2011.10.002. 
  6. ^ Paynter, Raymond A. Jnr., ed. (1968). Check-list of birds of the world, Volume 14. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Museum of Comparative Zoology. pp. 299–305. 
  7. ^ Clements, J.F.; Schulenberg, T.S.; Iliff, M.J.; Roberson, D.; Fredericks, T.A.; Sullivan, B.L.; Wood, C.L. (2014). "eBird/Clements checklist of birds of the world: Version 6.9". The Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Retrieved 23 June 2015.