Cock's peculiar tumour

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Cock's peculiar tumour is a sebaceous cyst linked growth that can resemble a squamous cell carcinoma.[1] The name is given after a 19th-century English surgeon Edward Cock.[2] The proliferating cyst is usually solitary, but it often arises from a simple trichilemmal cysts in the hair follicle epithelium and these are multiple in 70% of cases. They are most commonly found on the scalp where the proliferating trichilemmal cyst will grow to a large size and ulcerate. Chronic inflammation can cause the cyst to take the form of a granuloma. This granuloma mimics a squamous-cell carcinoma (both clinically and histologically) and these ulcerating solitary cysts are called Cock's peculiar tumour.[3]

Chronic inflammation causes the cyst to take the form of a granuloma. This granuloma mimics a squamous cell tumour. Hence it is a misnomer. It is not a tumour but looks like a tumour. The most common sites are the ones where one can find hairs. these are, scalp and scrotum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ramachandran, Manoj; Adam Poole (2003). Clinical cases and OSCEs in surgery. Elsevier Health Sciences. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-443-07044-0. Retrieved May 24, 2009. 
  2. ^ Kumar, S. Sujith; Selvakumar, Muthiah; Thirunavukuarasu, R. (2012). "Cock's peculiar tumour". Indian Journal of Surgery. 75 (4): 325–326. doi:10.1007/s12262-012-0464-1. PMC 3726821free to read. PMID 24426466. 
  3. ^ Firkin, Barry G.; Whitworth, Judith A. (1996). Dictionary of Medical Eponyms (2nd ed.). London: Parthenon. pp. 70–71. ISBN 978-1-85-070477-5.