Cocktails with cachaça

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There are many cocktails made with cachaça, the national spirit of Brazil. Caipirinha is by far the most popular and internationally well-known.[1]

Caipirinha[edit]

Caipirinha
Cocktail
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Standard garnishlime[2]
Standard drinkware
Old Fashioned Glass.svg
Old Fashioned glass
Commonly used ingredients
PreparationPlace lime and sugar into old fashioned glass and muddle (mash the two ingredients together using a muddler or a wooden spoon). Fill the glass with crushed ice and add the Cachaça.[3]
NotesA wide variety of fresh fruits can be used in place of lime. In the absence of cachaça, vodka can be used, making a caipiroska.[4] If rum is used instead of cachaça it is called a caipiríssima.[5]

The Caipirinha is Brazil's national cocktail made with cachaça, ice, sugar, and lime. It is the drink most commonly associated with cachaça.

If vodka is used instead of cachaça, it is called a caipiroska or caipivodka; if rum is used it is called a caipiríssima[further explanation needed]; if strawberry or some other fruit is used instead of lime, it is usually called a batida or caipifruta.

Batida[edit]

Batida
Cocktail
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice
Commonly used ingredients
PreparationMix and pour into chilled glass.

Batida is a Brazilian cocktail made with the national alcoholic drink cachaça. In Portuguese, batida means shaken or milkshake. It is made with cachaça, fruit juice (or coconut milk), and sugar. It can be blended or shaken with ice.

In Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, batidas are traditionally served with feijoada.

A variation is made adding sweet condensed milk or sour cream.

Outside Brazil, the drink is commonly made with vodka instead of cachaça.

The most common fruit used in a Batida are lemon, passion fruit and coconut.

Rabo-de-galo[edit]

Rabo-de-galo, which means "cock tail" (in Brazilian Portuguese cocktail is called coquetel), is a Brazilian drink made of cachaça and red vermouth. It is also known as Traçado, the Portuguese word for mixed. Alternatively, is known as a mixture of "everything you have in the bar" in some places. It is questionable whether the proportions in rabo-de-galo have ever been formally established. Most bartenders will simply "eyeball" the two ingredients, adjusting the proportions to the customer's taste. A quite common version calls for 2/3 of cachaça and 1/3 of vermouth. Rabo-de-galo is usually served straight up in large shot glasses. A popular variation in São Paulo, Brazil substitutes the vermouth with Cynar, an Italian bitter apéritif liqueur flavored with artichoke.

Caju Amigo (Friendly Cashew)[edit]

Caju amigo
Cocktail
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedNeat; undiluted and without ice
Standard garnishSlice of cashew
Standard drinkware
Shot Glass (Standard).svg
Shot glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part cachaça
  • 1 slice of cashew, or 1 part cashew juice
PreparationThe slice is placed on the tongue and chased by the shot of cachaça. Or the two ingredients are mixed in a shot glass and served straight.

Caju Amigo, also known as Cajuzinho (Little Cashew), is a Brazilian drink made of cachaça and cashew juice. In some places, a slice of cashew is put in the drinker's mouth with a little bit of salt, chewed without swallowing, and a shot of cachaça is thrown back straight- swallowing the fruit and the drink at the same time.

Quentão (Hot Stuff)[edit]

Quentão
Cocktail
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedHot
Standard garnishcitrus peel
Standard drinkware
Irish Coffee Glass (Mug).svg
Mug
Commonly used ingredients
Preparationcaramelize the sugar with the spices and peels, then add the liquids. Boil for a few minutes then serve hot.

Quentão, which means "very hot" or "big hot one", is a hot Brazilian drink made of cachaça and spices. It is often served during the celebrations known as Festas Juninas. The sugar is first caramelized with spices (whole cloves, cinnamon sticks and ginger chunks) and citrus peels (orange and lime). This mixture is then boiled with water for 10 minutes. The cachaça is added and boiled for another 5 minutes.

It is very common in southernmost parts of Brazil to use red wine instead of cachaça, the primary ingredient of Quentão, since this region is the largest wine producer in Brazil.

As the name suggests, it's meant to be served hot - ideally to be served outside on social gatherings on cold nights, near a fireplace. The ginger also adds to the sensation of warmth in the drink. The gingery flavor should be very distinctive, high notes of cloves must be present also. Nutmeg is an optional ingredient, used in some recipes.

Leite de Onça (Jaguar Milk)[edit]

Leite de Onça
Cocktail
TypeCocktail
Primary alcohol by volume
ServedNeat; undiluted and without ice
Standard garnishcinnamon or chocolate (optional)
Standard drinkwaremug (preferably a non-transparent one)
Commonly used ingredients
  • 1 part cachaça
  • 1 part milk
  • 1 part cocoa liqueur
  • 1/2 part of condensed milk
Preparationmix the condensed milk and the milk until they blend together. Add cachaça and let it rest. Add cocoa licor when it's ready to serve

Leite de onça (Jaguar milk) is a cold Brazilian drink made of cachaça and condensed milk. It is very sweet and has a very suave scent that evokes the homely atmosphere of a Festa Junina. It is not easy to replace the ingredients and achieve a similar result because its taste is very peculiar.

It is usually served cold, in plain mugs, without garnish (though often cinnamon or chocolate powder is sprinkled over) so that it looks like milk at a first glance.

Royce (Shaken)[edit]

Les Roysa
Cocktail
TypeMixed drink
Primary alcohol by volume
Servedrocks x
Standard drinkware
Zombie Glass.svg
Zombie glass
Commonly used ingredients
  • 2 parts cachaça
  • 1 slice of each fresh orange, lemon and lime.
  • 1 ounce of guava juice.
  • 1 tbsp sugar
PreparationIn a mixing glass, mix sugar and fruit slices and press to juice fruit, add ice, guava juice and cachaça, mix again - pour into tall glass.
This cocktail was invented at Liberty Bar in Seattle, Washington in honor of Royce Gracie.

Royce is an American cocktail made with the Brazilian national spirit cachaça. This cocktail was named in honor of Royce Gracie, a great Brazilian jiu-jitsu fighter.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cachaça: Beyond a One-Note Samba", The New York Times, July 10, 2012
  2. ^ http://www6.senado.gov.br/legislacao/ListaPublicacoes.action?id=237488
  3. ^ http://www.caipirinhacocktail.com/caipirinha-recipe
  4. ^ http://www.maria-brazil.org/caipirinha.htm
  5. ^ pt:Caipiríssima

External links[edit]