Coeur d'Alene Resort

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
The Coeur d'Alene Resort
Golf Course
Floatinggreen.jpg
The Floating Green - (14th Hole)
on Lake Coeur d'Alene in 2005
Club information
Coeur d'Alene Resort is located in Idaho
Coeur d'Alene Resort
Location of the resort in north Idaho
Coordinates 47°40′19″N 116°47′02″W / 47.672°N 116.784°W / 47.672; -116.784Coordinates: 47°40′19″N 116°47′02″W / 47.672°N 116.784°W / 47.672; -116.784
Location Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, U.S.
Elevation 2,150 feet (660 m)
Established 1991, 27 years ago
Type Resort / Public
Owned by Duane Hagadone
& Jerry Jaeger
Operated by Hagadone Hospitality
Total holes 18
Website cdaresort.com
Designed by Scott Miller
Par 71
Length 6,803 yd (6,221 m) (gold)[1]
6,355 yd (5,811 m) (blue)
5,914 yd (5,408 m) (tan)
5,436 yd (4,971 m) (copper)
4,448 yd (4,067 m) (mauve)
Course rating 71.8, 70.1 (blue), 68.2 (tan)[2]
Slope rating 127, 122 (blue), 116 (tan)[2]
Course record 64
ResortLogo.jpg

The Coeur d'Alene Resort is a luxury resort hotel in the northwest United States, located in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Seated on the north shore of Lake Coeur d'Alene by Tubbs Hill, the resort features a marina, convention facilities, spa, as well as a notable 18-hole golf course.

The hotel has 338 rooms and suites, and its main tower has 18 floors. At 216 feet (66 m), it is the tallest building in northern Idaho and the third-highest in the state.

History[edit]

The "North Shore Resort" opened 53 years ago in 1965 and completed its seven-story tower in 1973;[3] it was acquired by Hagadone Hospitality in June 1983 in a takeover of Western Frontiers, Inc.[4][5][6] Duane Hagadone soon announced plans for resort expansion,[7] and the North Shore closed on New Year's Day in 1986 for several months; it reopened in the spring with a new name: "The Coeur d'Alene: A Resort on the Lake."[8][9] The new 18-story addition, known as the Lake Tower, was built by Hagadone and Jerry Jaeger and opened 32 years ago in May 1986.[10][11] Designed by architect R.G. Nelson, the hotel features a 0.75-mile (1.2 km) floating boardwalk around the marina.

The golf course is about a mile east (1.6 km) of the resort and was originally the site of the Rutledge sawmill,[12][13] which operated from 1916 to 1987, closing on October 31.[14][15][16] The Hagadone Corporation bought the property from Potlatch Corporation in March 1988 via a three-way land swap,[17][18] and its buildings were allowed to be burned in June; local fire departments used it as a training exercise.[19][20]

The golf course and the floating green were developed, and the course opened for play 27 years ago in 1991.[21][22][23] Its construction required environmental clean-up of the debris left from the lumber industry,[12] and had stalled in August 1988.[24][25] With environmental concerns allayed, the project was well received in January and course construction began in 1989.[26]

The seven-story Park Tower (1973), completed a renovation in 2000,[6] as did the signature Lake Tower (1986) in 2006.[27]

Golf course[edit]

The resort's golf course is best known for its floating green on the 14th hole,[21][22][23][28] and location on the north shore of the lake.[29][30] The 2,300-ton floating green was installed in September 1990 and unveiled by Hagadone and Governor Cecil Andrus shortly after;[31] the course opened the following spring.[21][22][23] "Putter" is the vessel that shuttles players to and from the green.

Phoenix-based designer Scott Miller planned the course to feel like a park, and it has since been ranked among the best resort golf courses in the United States by Golf Digest, Golf Magazine and others.[30][32] The course was featured in the video game Tiger Woods PGA Tour 2005; its average elevation is approximately 2,200 feet (670 m) above sea level.

Scorecard[edit]

Coeur d'Alene Resort Golf Course
Tee Rating/Slope 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Par 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 5 35 4 5 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 36 71
Handicap Men's 7 3 17 5 13 15 11 9 1 6 2 14 12 10 16 8 18 4
Gold 71.8 / 127 540 479 155 322 148 169 435 437 601 3286 469 538 249 368 218 495 429 269 482 3517 6803
Combo 70.6 / 125 540 436 155 307 148 169 395 437 566 3153 469 522 208 368 175 495 417 269 451 3374 6527
Blue 70.1 / 122 526 436 128 307 132 163 395 420 566 3073 438 522 208 336 175 478 417 257 451 3282 6355
Tan M:68.2/116 W:73.1/129 499 377 114 256 120 155 389 399 540 2849 406 506 180 293 147 462 401 236 434 3065 5914
Par 5 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 5 35 4 5 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 36 71
Handicap Women's 3 7 15 9 17 13 11 5 1 10 2 18 16 12 8 6 14 4
Copper 70.2 / 126 424 327 108 249 105 136 350 370 510 2579 351 484 148 278 137 443 391 229 396 2857 5436
Mauve 64.8 / 113 387 285 88 220 91 124 240 308 425 2168 256 395 133 171 95 373 313 208 336 2280 4448

Source:[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Scorecard" (PDF). Coeur d'Alene Resort Golf Course. Retrieved June 26, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c "Course Rating & Slope: Cd'A Resort". USGA. Retrieved June 26, 2016. 
  3. ^ "June target". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. (photo). March 28, 1973. p. 5. 
  4. ^ Clark, Doug (May 28, 1983). "Templin files suit to stop takeover bid". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 2. 
  5. ^ Ledford, David (June 5, 1983). "Turf war ends with Hagadone the winner". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A20. 
  6. ^ a b Rosdahl, Nils (January 12, 2000). "Resort renovation". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  7. ^ Newman, David (May 31, 1984). "Hadadone: Great days ahead for Lake City". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. Aa. 
  8. ^ Kramer, Jeff (May 15, 1985). "North Shore to close for remodeling". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  9. ^ "Resort closes - temporarily". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. January 1, 1986. p. A7. 
  10. ^ Ripley, Richard (May 3, 1986). "Hagadone gambles $60 million that lots of 'sizzle won't fizzle". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. B1. 
  11. ^ Newman, David (May 5, 1986). "20,000 stand in line to tour The Coeur d'Alene resort". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. B6. 
  12. ^ a b Bond, David (September 17, 1987). "Sawmill cleanup studied". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  13. ^ Oliveria, D.F. (May 25, 1988). "Hagadone buying up more land on Lake Coeur d'Alene". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A3. 
  14. ^ Bond, David (January 21, 1987). "Potlatch will close Coeur d'Alene mill". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A3. 
  15. ^ "Historic Rutledge Mill saws its final log". Lewiston Sunday Tribune. Idaho. Associated Press. November 1, 1987. p. 6B. 
  16. ^ Bond, David (October 31, 1987). "Last log sawn at Rutlege mill in wee hours of morning". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  17. ^ "Rutledge mill site sold, Potlatch official says". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. March 3, 1988. p. B2. 
  18. ^ Jones, Grayden (April 12, 1989). "Hagadone swapped land for resort site". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A6. 
  19. ^ Bender, David (May 25, 1988). "Firefighters will get practice when mill is set ablaze in June". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A9. 
  20. ^ Goffredo, Theresa (June 8, 1988). "Judge says its OK to burn buildings at Potlatch mill". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A1. 
  21. ^ a b c "April opening set for golf course". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. staff and wire reports. August 15, 1990. p. B2. 
  22. ^ a b c "Floating green confronts players on Idaho course". Bend Bulletin. Oregon. Associated Press. June 13, 1991. p. E-8. 
  23. ^ a b c "Tee-off pier proposed for floating green". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. September 20, 1991. p. B1. 
  24. ^ Oliveria, D.F.; Bender, David (August 3, 1988). "Skeptics question Hagadone's motives". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. C5. 
  25. ^ Oliveria, D.F. (December 10, 1988). "Board gets Hagadone proposals". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A8. 
  26. ^ Taggart, Cynthia (January 27, 1989). "Region hails 'Northwest playground' plan". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. A1. 
  27. ^ Bergum, Steve (June 3, 2006). "Loop courses maturing nicely". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 3-golf. 
  28. ^ "Floating golf green anchors in Coeur d'Alene". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah. Associated Press. September 2, 1990. p. B9. 
  29. ^ Bond, David (September 24, 1987). "Hearing set on floating green". Spokane Chronicle. Washington. p. A4. 
  30. ^ a b Coeur d'Alene, Official Idaho Vacation and Travel Planning Guide, Accessed January 27, 2009.
  31. ^ "Hagadone: Floating green won't harm lake". Idahonian. Moscow. October 2, 1990. p. 3A. 
  32. ^ "The Best Golf Courses in Idaho". Golf Digest. August 24, 2015. Retrieved July 10, 2016. 

External links[edit]