Coffee County, Georgia

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Coffee County, Georgia
Coffee County Courthouse2012.jpg
Coffee County Courthouse in Douglas
Map of Georgia highlighting Coffee County
Location in the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Founded February 9, 1854
Named for John E. Coffee
Seat Douglas
Largest city Douglas
Area
 • Total 603 sq mi (1,562 km2)
 • Land 575 sq mi (1,489 km2)
 • Water 28 sq mi (73 km2), 4.6%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 43,108
 • Density 74/sq mi (29/km2)
Congressional district 12th
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website coffeecountygov.com

Coffee County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 42,356.[1] The county seat is Douglas.[2]

Coffee County comprises the Douglas, GA Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Coffee County was created by an act of the Georgia General Assembly on February 9, 1854, from portions of Clinch, Irwin, Telfair, and Ware counties. These lands were originally ceded by the Creek in the Treaty of Fort Jackson in (1814) and the Treaty of the Creek Agency (1818) and apportioned to the above counties before becoming Coffee County.

Berrien (1856), Jeff Davis (1905), and Atkinson (1917) counties were subsequently formed from sections of Coffee County.

The County is named for General John E. Coffee, a state legislator and a U. S. representative.[3][4]

Coffee County Correctional Facility is located in Nicholls, Georgia. It is privately owned and operated by Corrections Corporation of America (CCA), the largest prison company in the nation.

Many of the early settlers of what is now Coffee County are buried in historic cemeteries across the region, including the cemetery at Lone Hill United Methodist Church -- located at 6833 Broxton-West Green Highway, some 10 miles northeast of Douglas, Georgia. The church and its cemetery date to the 1840s, with the earliest marked grave dated 1848. A majestic Eastern Redcedar has graced the cemetery for generations and is recognized as the nation’s largest of this species through American Forests’ Champion Trees program. (see: www.americanforests.org/BigTrees</ref>) In July of 2018 the tree was recognized as 2018’s Great American Tree by American Grove. ( See: [5]) Having been nominated by Mark McClellan of the Georgia Forestry Commission, the tree has been featured in such publications as the Smithsonian magazine and Janisse Ray’s Wild Card Quilt. The circumference of the tree exceeds 20 feet.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 603 square miles (1,560 km2), of which 575 square miles (1,490 km2) is land and 28 square miles (73 km2) (4.6%) is water.[6]

The vast majority of Coffee County is located in the Satilla River sub-basin of the St. Marys-Satilla River basin. The northern corner of the county, well north of Broxton, an area bisected by State Route 107, is located in the Lower Ocmulgee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin. The very southwestern corner of Coffee County, northeast of Alapaha, is located in the Alapaha River sub-basin of the Suwannee River basin.[7]

Highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18602,879
18703,19210.9%
18805,07058.8%
189010,483106.8%
190016,16954.2%
191021,95335.8%
192018,653−15.0%
193019,7395.8%
194021,5419.1%
195023,96111.2%
196021,953−8.4%
197022,8284.0%
198026,89417.8%
199029,59210.0%
200037,41326.4%
201042,35613.2%
Est. 201643,012[8]1.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
1790–1960[10] 1900–1990[11]
1990–2000[12] 2010–2013[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 37,413 people, 13,354 households, and 9,788 families residing in the county. The population density was 62 people per square mile (24/km²). There were 15,610 housing units at an average density of 26 per square mile (10/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 68.23% White, 25.88% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 4.04% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. 6.82% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 13,354 households out of which 37.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.50% were married couples living together, 15.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.70% were non-families. 22.60% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.30% under the age of 18, 11.00% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 20.50% from 45 to 64, and 9.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 98.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,710, and the median income for a family was $35,936. Males had a median income of $26,642 versus $20,644 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,530. About 15.30% of families and 19.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.90% of those under age 18 and 21.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 42,356 people, 14,817 households, and 10,630 families residing in the county.[14] The population density was 73.7 inhabitants per square mile (28.5/km2). There were 17,061 housing units at an average density of 29.7 per square mile (11.5/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 64.7% white, 26.6% black or African American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 6.3% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 10.3% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 14.6% were English, 10.7% were American, and 5.8% were Irish.[16]

Of the 14,817 households, 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.1% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.3% were non-families, and 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.18. The median age was 34.8 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $35,202 and the median income for a family was $39,880. Males had a median income of $33,590 versus $26,129 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,664. About 18.3% of families and 21.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 29.6% of those under age 18 and 18.4% of those age 65 or over.[17]

Education[edit]

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Previous Presidential Elections Results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third Parties
2016 68.9% 9,588 29.4% 4,094 1.7% 233
2012 63.9% 9,248 34.9% 5,057 1.2% 169
2008 64.5% 8,872 35.0% 4,811 0.6% 75
2004 67.4% 8,306 32.3% 3,979 0.4% 48
2000 61.0% 5,756 38.1% 3,593 0.9% 81
1996 48.7% 3,934 42.2% 3,407 9.1% 734
1992 45.3% 3,778 39.3% 3,275 15.4% 1286
1988 58.9% 4,019 40.7% 2,777 0.4% 26
1984 61.5% 4,200 38.5% 2,633
1980 37.7% 2,499 61.0% 4,038 1.3% 84
1976 23.6% 1,417 76.5% 4,601
1972 86.6% 3,934 13.4% 607
1968 19.5% 1,241 20.9% 1331 59.5% 3,785
1964 61.8% 4,392 38.2% 2,719
1960 22.6% 987 77.4% 3,376
1956 15.2% 574 84.8% 3,199
1952 24.7% 1,078 75.3% 3,292
1948 15.8% 653 76.5% 3,168 7.8% 323
1944 18.4% 366 81.6% 1,625
1940 7.6% 128 92.2% 1,561 0.3% 5
1936 6.4% 116 93.6% 1,702 0.1% 1
1932 1.7% 29 97.1% 1,652 1.2% 21
1928 33.5% 591 66.6% 1,176
1924 9.5% 62 78.5% 510 12.0% 78
1920 35.1% 230 64.9% 426
1916 1.3% 29 93.4% 2,091 5.4% 120
1912 8.4% 85 88.8% 895 2.8% 28

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 20, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. p. 86. 
  4. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 47. ISBN 0-915430-00-2. 
  5. ^ http://thegrove.americangrove.org/
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  7. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved 2015-11-27. 
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  9. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 20, 2014. 
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 20, 2014. 
  11. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 20, 2014. 
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 20, 2014. 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  14. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  16. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  17. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015-12-27. 
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-19. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°33′N 82°51′W / 31.55°N 82.85°W / 31.55; -82.85