Coin ceremony

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The Coin Ceremony is an event which takes place at the keel laying, in the early stages of a ship's construction. In it, the shipbuilders place one or two coins under the keelblock of the new ship to bless the ship and as a symbol of good fortune.[1][2] The coins are not normally fixed in place and are often retrieved when the ship sails out of the dry-dock,[3] (although they are sometimes welded to the keel).[4]

The Mast Stepping ceremony is a similar event which occurs towards the end of a ship's construction, and involves the placing of coins underneath the mast of a ship. In shipbuilding today, the coins are normally welded beneath the radar mast.[5]

History[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ QM2 at maritime matters:see 4 July 2002 Archived 5 August 2003 at the Wayback Machine. retrieved 25 October 2009
  2. ^ Gold Bulletin: Gold coin used in traditional maritime ceremony Friday, 9 May 2008, retrieved 25 October 2009
  3. ^ The Northern Advocate:Keel ceremony milestone in patrol boat construction Mike Dinsdale, 24 March 2006
  4. ^ [Oceania Cruises:OCEANIA CRUISES AND FINCANTIERI COMMENCE CONSTRUCTION OF MARINA] 7 March 2009
  5. ^ US Navy press release: Crew of New Multimission Destroyer Honors Namesake in Mast Stepping Ceremony 17 July 2009, retrieved 25 October 2009

Royal Caribbean Coin Ceremony for Allure of the Seas http://allureoftheseas.com[permanent dead link]