Colin Carrie

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Doctor
Colin Carrie
MP
DrCarrie.jpg
Official Opposition Critic for Health
Assumed office
April 8, 2016
Leader Rona Ambrose
Preceded by Kellie Leitch
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Oshawa
Assumed office
June 28, 2004
Preceded by Ivan Grose
Personal details
Born (1962-04-11) April 11, 1962 (age 54)
Hamilton, Ontario
Political party Conservative
Residence Oshawa, Ontario
Profession Chiropractor
Religion Roman Catholic

Colin Carrie, MP (born April 11, 1962) is a Canadian politician. He is a current member of the House of Commons of Canada, representing the riding of Oshawa in the province of Ontario for the Conservative Party of Canada.

Personal life[edit]

Carrie was born in Hamilton, Ontario.[1] He lived in several Canadian cities before settling in Oshawa at age fifteen. He has a Bachelor's Degree in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo, and was awarded a Doctor of Chiropractic in 1989 from the Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College.[citation needed] Prior to entering politics, he worked as a chiropractor.[citation needed] He is a past executive member of the Durham Chiropractic Society and former Chair of Spinal Health Week in Durham Region, and has been Financial Secretary of the Oshawa Knights of Columbus.[citation needed] Carrie also served as a Director of the Oshawa Progressive Conservative Party Association, before the party's 2004 merger with the Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party of Canada.[citation needed]

Political career[edit]

Carrie was first elected as Member of Parliament (Canada) for Oshawa in the 2004 federal election, defeating NDP candidate Sid Ryan and Liberal candidate Louise Parkes in a close three-way race. In the 38th Parliament, he served as a member of the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health.[2]

During this session, he reintroduced Private Member's Bill C-420 An Act to Amend the Food and Drugs Act (previously introduced by James Lunney) to end the listing of vitamins, minerals and related products as drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act. This measure has been criticized by some as removing a safety provision from the regulation of natural health products. Supporters of the bill argued that it would benefit the position of small producers relative to the pharmaceutical industry.[3] Carrie also served as the founding Chair of the Conservative Party of Canada’s Automotive Caucus and was also a member of the Conservative Party of Canada’s Energy Caucus and Seniors Caucus.

In a close two-way race with returning NDP challenger Sid Ryan, he retained his seat in the 2006 election as part of the first Conservative government to be elected in Canada in almost 13 years. He once again retained his seat in October 2008. On February 7, 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper appointed him to the post of Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Industry.

Carrie once again retained his seat in the 2008 federal election. In a two-way race between himself and NDP candidate Mike Shields, Carrie won by a larger margin than his previous two elections.[4] In November 2008, Carrie was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Health by Prime Minister Stephen Harper.[5] During the 40th Parliament Carrie resumed his membership on the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health.[6]

In the 2011 federal election, Carrie won his fourth election in seven years. In an historic election which saw the Liberals relegated to the third party and the Conservatives achieve a majority in the House of Commons, Carrie was elected ahead of his main opponent, NDP candidate and CAW President Chris Buckley, receiving a landslide 51.3% support from Oshawa voters.[7] Carrie won by the largest margin of victory in Oshawa since the NDP's Ed Broadbent in the 1980 federal election.[8]

In September 2013, Carrie was appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment.

Electoral record[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2015
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Colin Carrie 23,162 38.17 -12.96
New Democratic Mary Fowler 19,339 31.87 -5.23
Liberal Tito-Dante Marimpietri 16,588 27.33 +19.67
Green Michael Dempsey 1,522 2.51 -1.04
Marxist–Leninist David Gershuny 75 0.12
Total valid votes/Expense limit 60,686 100.00   $239,340.16
Total rejected ballots 228 0.37
Turnout 60,914 63.74
Eligible voters 95,561
Conservative hold Swing -3.86
Source: Elections Canada[9][10]
Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Colin Carrie 26,034 51.31 +9.95
New Democratic Chris Buckley 19,212 37.87 +3.15
Liberal James Morton 3,536 6.97 -9.07
Green Gail Bates 1,631 3.21 -3.78
Libertarian Matthew Belanger 260 0.51
Marxist–Leninist David Gershuny 61 0.12 -0.12
Total valid votes/Expense limit 50,734 100.00
Total rejected ballots 200 0.39 0.00
Turnout 50,934 57.31 +2.06
Eligible voters 88,878
Conservative hold Swing +6.8
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Colin Carrie 19.951 41.36 +2.76 $83,665
New Democratic Mike Shields 16,750 34.72 +1.26 $66,814
Liberal Sean Godfrey 7,741 16.04 -7.94 $62,601
Green Pat Gostlin 3,374 6.99 +3.22 $9,606
Christian Heritage Peter Vogel 246 0.51 $2,149
Marxist–Leninist David Gershuny 117 0.24 -0.07
Canadian Action Alex Kreider 52 0.10
Total valid votes/Expense limit 48,231 100.00 $89,927
Total rejected ballots 191 0.39 +0.04
Turnout 48,422 55.25 -8.62
Conservative hold Swing +0.75
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Colin Carrie 20,657 38.60 +5.39
New Democratic Sid Ryan 17,905 33.46 +1.23
Liberal Louise V. Parkes 12,831 23.98 -6.49
Green Adam Jobse 2,019 3.77 -0.11
Marxist–Leninist David Gershuny 91 0.17 -0.02
Total valid votes 53,503 100.00
Total rejected ballots 186 0.35 -0.25
Turnout 53,689 63.87 +6.67
Conservative hold Swing +4.16
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Conservative Colin Carrie 15,815 33.21 -10.7
New Democratic Sid Ryan 15,352 32.23 +21.1
Liberal Louise V. Parkes 14,510 30.47 -12.4
Green Liisa Walley 1,850 3.88
Marxist–Leninist Tim Sullivan 91 0.19 -0.1
Total valid votes 47,618 100.0
Total rejected ballots 287 0.60
Turnout 47,905 57.20
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +1.7

References[edit]

  1. ^ Library of Parliament (January 28, 2011). "Parliamentary File". Library of Parliament. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-01-28. Date of Birth 
  2. ^ "House of Commons HESA Archive". 2011-01-28. Retrieved 2011-01-28. 
  3. ^ Use (Abuse) of Regulations to Protect Pharma Monopoly - Share The Wealth
  4. ^ CBC: Canada Votes 2008 (October 14, 2008). "Oshawa 2008 Results". 'CBC. 
  5. ^ Library of Parliament (January 28, 2011). "Parliamentary File". Library of Parliament. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-01-28. Date of Birth 
  6. ^ House of Commons (January 28, 2011). "HESA Archive". House of Commons. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-01-28. 
  7. ^ Elections Canada (May 4, 2011). "Results Validated by the Returning Officer". Elections Canada. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-05-19. Voting numbers 
  8. ^ Parliament of Canada (May 19, 2011). "Oshawa - Historical Riding Results since 1867". Parliament of Canada. p. 1. Retrieved 2011-05-19. Political History and Riding Results 
  9. ^ Elections Canada – Confirmed candidates for Oshawa, 30 September 2015
  10. ^ Elections Canada – Preliminary Election Expenses Limits for Candidates Archived August 15, 2015, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]