Colin King-Ansell

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Colin King-Ansell (born 1947) is a prominent figure in far-right politics in New Zealand. He has been described as "New Zealand’s most notorious Nazi cheerleader and Holocaust denier".[1]

In 1967 he joined the National Socialist Party of New Zealand. In December 1967 King-Ansell was given an 18 months prison sentence for damage to a synagogue.[2][3]

King-Ansell first achieved national New Zealand fame in 1968 when he appeared on a television current affairs programme. When questioned about the Holocaust, he dismissed it as lies and Allied propaganda, prompting public anger[citation needed]. King-Ansell however did not elaborate his views on the screen. Seven years later the current affairs host Brian Edwards said the first tape of the interview was accidentally not broadcast.[4]

In 1969 he became leader of the National Socialist Party.[5] He stood for the National Socialists in the general election of 1972 and contested the Mount Albert in 1975 and again in 1978. In 1979 he was fined $400 following an appeal against a three-month prison sentence for breaching the Race Relations Act.[6]

He was subsequently involved in a number of extremist groups, including Unit 88. As the leader of the NZ Fascist Union he was interviewed on the Paul Holmes show[citation needed].

In 2006 he became chairman of a local business association, Progress Hawera,[7] but was expelled when his far-right past was exposed.

King-Ansell leads the New Zealand National Front. He has declared that he has renounced Nazism.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hitler ’stuffed up a damn good idea’ The Taranaki Daily News 17 June 2006
  2. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987) p155
  3. ^ http://slackbastard.anarchobase.com/?p=15075
  4. ^ Ku Klux Kiwis, Australia/Israel Review, 1998
  5. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987) p151
  6. ^ Spoonley, Paul The Politics of Nostalgia: racism and the extreme right in New Zealand The Dunmore Press (1987) p155
  7. ^ Exposed! Heil Hawera: Past catches up with former neo-Nazi leader The Taranaki Daily News 17 June 2006
  8. ^ Right-wing party 'not recruiting in schools' The Taranaki Daily News 13 March 2009