Collection of meteorites in the National Museum of Brazil

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Exhibition of meteorites in the museum.

The National Museum of Brazil collections include an exhibition of meteorites discovered in Brazil and other countries.[1]

One of the most important meteorites that was on display is the Bendegó meteorite, which weighs over 5,000 kg and was discovered in 1784.[2] It survived the fire that destroyed the museum in 2018, sustaining no major damage.[3]

Image Name Type Find location Year TKW Notes
Meteorito Avanhandava MN 01.jpg Avanhandava Chondrite Avanhandava, São Paulo, Brazil 1952 9.33 kg (20.6 lb) Mostly composed of iron (27.15%) and olivine (17.3%).[4]
Bendegó meteorite, front, National Museum, Rio de Janeiro.jpg Bendegó Iron meteorite Bahia, Brazil 1784 5,360 kg (11,820 lb) It is the biggest iron meteorite ever found in Brazilian soil.[5]
Meteorito Brehan MN 01.jpg Brenham Pallasite Kansas, United States 1882 4,300 kg (9,500 lb)
Meteorito Campos Sales MN 01.jpg Campos Sales Chondrite Ceará, Brazil 1991 23.68 kg (52.2 lb) [6]
Meteorito Carlton MN 01.jpg Carlton Siderite Hamilton County, Texas, United States 1887 81.2 kg (179 lb) [7]
Meteorito Glen Rose MN 01.jpg Glen Rose Iron Glen Rose, Texas, United States 1934 11 kg (24 lb)
Henbury Siderite Australia 1922 2,000 kg (4,400 lb) [8]
Krasnojarsk Pallasite Russia 1749 700 kg (1,500 lb) [9]
Meteorito Pará de Minas 01.jpg Pará de Minas Siderite Minas Gerais, Brazil 1934 112 kg (247 lb)
Meteorito Patos de Minas MN 01.jpg Patos de Minas Octahedrite Minas Gerais, Brazil 1925 218.4 kg (481 lb) Composed of iron and nickel.[10]
Meteorito Pirapora MN 01.jpg Pirapora Siderite Minas Gerais, Brazil 1888 6.18 kg (13.6 lb) Composed of iron and nickel.[11]
Santa Catharina Siderite Santa Catarina, Brazil 1875 7,000 kg (15,000 lb) [12]
São João Nepomuceno Siderite São João Nepomuceno, Brazil 1960 15.3 kg (34 lb) [13]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Exposições" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  2. ^ Sears, P M (1963). "Recovery of the Bendego Meteorite". Meteoritics. 2 (1): 22–23. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  3. ^ "Bendegó: el meteorito que resistió las llamas del incendio del Museo Nacional de Brasil". BioBioChile - La Red de Prensa Más Grande de Chile (in Spanish). 3 September 2018. Retrieved 3 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Avanhadava" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  5. ^ "Bendegó" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  6. ^ "Campos Sales" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Carlton" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  8. ^ "Henbury" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  9. ^ "Krasnojarsk" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  10. ^ "Meteorito" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Pirapora" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  12. ^ "Santa Catarina" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  13. ^ "São João Napomuceno" (in Portuguese). National Museum of Brazil. Retrieved 4 September 2018.