Colleges That Change Lives

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Colleges That Change Lives: 40 Schools That Will Change The Way You Think About College
Colleges That Change Lives.jpg
First edition
AuthorLoren Pope
(2013-2014 edition) Revised by Hilary Masell Oswald
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreEducation
PublisherPenguin Books
Publication date
1996 (first edition)
ISBN0-14-303736-6
OCLC65341249
378.73 22
LC ClassL901 .P58 2006

Colleges That Change Lives began as an college educational guide first published in 1996 by the late former education editor of The New York Times, Loren Pope. Colleges That Change Lives (CTCL) was founded in 1998 is a non-profit, 501(c)(3) based on Pope's book.

The book[edit]

Colleges That Change Lives is a book that explores college admissions in the United States and has four editions. It was first published in 1996, with a second edition in 2000, and a third edition in 2006. The final fourth edition (2013-2014) was published in 2012 after Pope's death, and was revised by Hilary Masell Oswald.[1] A non-profit organization modeled after the book now carries the name.[1][2][3][4]

The fourth and final edition (2013-2014) profiles 40 choices for liberal arts colleges that, "have one primary mission: educate the undergraduate. Each appeals to a slightly different type of teenager, but they all share a mission to raise students' trajectories and develop thinkers, leaders, and moral citizens. The little-known truth is that these colleges have been on the cutting edge of higher education for decades. Many of them have outperformed most of the ranking sweethearts in the percentages of graduates who become America's scientists and scholars."[5]

Colleges That Change Lives (CTCL)[edit]

Following Loren Pope's message, Colleges That Change Lives (CTCL) was founded in 1998,[6] two years after the first edition, and "independent of Mr. Pope (although with his blessing) and his publisher."[6] It is recognized as a non-profit, 501(c)(3).[6] According to the CTCL website:[6]

Our Mission: Colleges That Change Lives, Inc. (CTCL) is a non-profit organization dedicated to the advancement and support of a student-centered college search process. We support the goal of every student finding a college that develops a lifelong love of learning and provides the foundation for a successful and fulfilling life beyond college.

CTCL was established to "as a way to keep Loren Pope's message alive." It is governed by a voluntary board of college counseling professionals.[1] After the publication of the book, the colleges "began working together as a group of like-minded schools."[1] A few years later, the non-profit was founded with Pope's approval.[1] Then in 2012, Pope's family "hired Hilary Masell Oswald to revise the book again. She identified four more schools, and the organization invited them to join CTCL."[1]

List of schools in the 2013-2014 edition[edit]

Northeast

Mid-Atlantic

South

Midwest

Southwest

West

List of current CTCL schools[edit]

The current CTCL list contains all of the schools above (except for Marlboro college which closed in 2020). It restored The Evergreen State College, Hampshire College, and Antioch College to the list, all of which were in the 1996, 2000, and 2006 editions. It also restored Bard College, which was in the 1996 edition.

Northwest

Northeast

Midwest

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Teare, Chris (2015-12-15). "Need Options? Consider Colleges That Change Lives". Forbes. Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  2. ^ Korry, Elaine (2006-03-16). "Book Touts 'Colleges that Change Lives'". NPR. Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  3. ^ Finder, Alan (February 28, 2007). "A Fighter for Colleges That Have Everything but Status". The New York Times. Retrieved May 10, 2015.
  4. ^ Hutchinson, Carol (September 27, 2008). "College Consultant Loren Pope; Commissioned a Wright House". Obituaries. The Washington Post. Retrieved June 4, 2021.
  5. ^ Pope, Loren. Revised by Hillary Masell Oswald. Colleges That Change Lives, 2013-2014 edition, 2012, p. 3.
  6. ^ a b c d "About CTCL". CTCL. Retrieved 2021-06-04.
  7. ^ "College Profiles". CTCL. Retrieved 2021-06-04.

External links[edit]