Colonel Bob Wilderness

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Colonel Bob Wilderness
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
Map showing the location of Colonel Bob Wilderness
Map showing the location of Colonel Bob Wilderness
Location Grays Harbor / Jefferson counties, Washington, USA
Nearest city Quinault, WA
Coordinates 47°24′0″N 123°45′0″W / 47.40000°N 123.75000°W / 47.40000; -123.75000Coordinates: 47°24′0″N 123°45′0″W / 47.40000°N 123.75000°W / 47.40000; -123.75000
Area 11,855 acres (4,798 ha)[1]
Established 1984
Governing body U.S. Forest Service
Colonel Bob Wilderness

Colonel Bob Wilderness is a 11,855-acre (4,798 ha) protected area located in the southwest corner of Olympic National Forest in the state of Washington.[2] It is named after 19th-century orator Robert Green Ingersoll. Lake Quinault lies about 15 miles to the west. Elevations in the wilderness vary from 300 to 4,509 feet above sea level. The highest elevation is an unnamed peak; the second-highest elevation is Colonel Bob Mountain at 4,492 feet. The wilderness is a temperate rain forest with annual rainfall greater than 150 inches (3,800 mm).[3]

History[edit]

In 1984, the U.S. Congress established five wilderness areas within the Olympic National Forest:[4]

The Colonel Bob Wilderness sits on the southern flank of the Olympic Wilderness, which was created in 1988.

Recreation[edit]

More than 12 miles (19 km) of trails provide access to the wilderness for backpacking, camping, hunting, and mountain climbing.[5] Access by road is via South Shore Quinault Lake Road to the north, or FS Road 2204 to the south. Access by trail is by Colonel Bob Trail #851, Pete's Creek Trail #858, and Fletcher Canyon Trail #857.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wilderness Acreage: Colonel Bob Wilderness". Wilderness.net. University of Montana. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Colonel Bob Wilderness". Wilderness.net. University of Montana. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "Colonel Bob Wilderness". Olympic National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Special Places". Olympic National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  5. ^ "Recreation Opportunity Guide Olympic National Forest: Colonel Bob Wilderness" (PDF). U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 

External links[edit]