Color Developing Agent 1

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Color Developing Agent 1
Diethyl-p-phenylenediamine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
N1,N1-Diethylbenzene-1,4-diamine
Other names
N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine
DPD
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.002.014 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 202-214-1
UNII
UN number 1673
  • InChI=1S/C10H16N2/c1-3-12(4-2)10-7-5-9(11)6-8-10/h5-8H,3-4,11H2,1-2H3
    Key: QNGVNLMMEQUVQK-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CCN(CC)C1=CC=C(C=C1)N
Properties
C10H16N2
Molar mass 164.252 g·mol−1
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS05: CorrosiveGHS06: Toxic
Danger
H301, H314
P260, P264, P270, P280, P301+P310, P301+P330+P331, P303+P361+P353, P304+P340, P305+P351+P338, P310, P321, P330, P363, P405, P501
Related compounds
Related compounds
Color Developing Agent 2; Color Developing Agent 3; Color Developing Agent 4;
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).


Color Developing Agent 1 (CD-1) is the first in the series of color developing agents used in developing color films. It is the organic compound N,N-diethyl-1,4-benzenediamine (DPD), which is usually in the form of the monohydrochloride salt.[1] In color development, after reducing a silver atom in a silver halide crystal, the oxidized developing agent combines with a color coupler to form a color dye molecule.

Arthur Thomas Palin, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, developed a widely-used color based method of water testing using DPD to indicate the chlorine content of treated water.

See Also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1,4-Benzenediamine, N,N-diethyl-, monohydrochloride". U.S. National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved 21 January 2020.