Colorado's congressional districts

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Colorado's congressional districts since 2013.[1]
Colorado's congressional districts set to take effect from 2023.[2]

Colorado is divided into 7 congressional districts, each represented by a member of the United States House of Representatives.

The districts are currently represented in the 117th United States Congress by 4 Democrats and 3 Republicans.

Starting in the 2022 mid-term elections, per the 2020 United States census, Colorado will gain a new congressional seat.[3]

History[edit]

The Territory of Colorado was represented by one non-voting Delegate to the United States House of Representatives from its organization on Thursday, February 2, 1861, until statehood on Tuesday, August 1, 1876.

The State of Colorado was represented by one United States representative elected at-large from statehood in 1876 until the end of the 52nd United States Congress in 1893. Colorado was represented by two United States representatives elected from two congressional districts from 1893 until the end of the 57th United States Congress in 1903. Colorado was represented by three United States representatives elected from two districts and one at-large from 1903 until the end of the 62nd United States Congress in 1913. Colorado was represented by four United States representatives elected from two districts and two at-large in the 63rd United States Congress from 1913 until 1915.

Since the 1914 United States House of Representatives elections, all U.S. Representatives from the State of Colorado have been elected from congressional districts. Colorado has been represented by four United States representatives from 1913 until the end of the 92nd United States Congress in 1973, five United States representatives from 1973 until the end of the 97th United States Congress in 1983, six United States representatives from 1983 until the end of the 107th United States Congress in 2003, and seven United States representatives since 2003.

Current districts and representatives[edit]

List of members of the Colorado United States House delegation, their terms, their district boundaries, and the districts' political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 7 members, including 4 Democrats, and 3 Republicans as of 2018.

Current U.S. representatives from Colorado
()
District Member
(Residence)[4]
Party Incumbent since CPVI
(2021)[5]
District map
1st Diana DeGette official photo (cropped).jpg
Diana DeGette
(Denver)
Democratic January 3, 1997 D+24 Colorado US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
2nd Joe Neguse, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Joe Neguse
(Lafayette)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+12 Colorado US Congressional District 2 (since 2013).tif
3rd Lauren Boebert 117th U.S Congress.jpg
Lauren Boebert
(Silt)
Republican January 3, 2021 R+6 Colorado US Congressional District 3 (since 2013).tif
4th Ken Buck official congressional photo (cropped 2).jpg
Ken Buck
(Windsor)
Republican January 3, 2015 R+12 Colorado US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
5th Doug Lamborn official portrait.jpg
Doug Lamborn
(Colorado Springs)
Republican January 3, 2007 R+12 Colorado US Congressional District 5 (since 2013).tif
6th Jason Crow, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg
Jason Crow
(Aurora)
Democratic January 3, 2019 D+6 Colorado US Congressional District 6 (since 2013).tif
7th Ed Perlmutter official photo.jpg
Ed Perlmutter
(Arvada)
Democratic January 3, 2007 D+7 Colorado US Congressional District 7 (since 2013).tif

Historical and present district boundaries[edit]

Table of United States congressional district boundary maps in the State of Colorado, presented chronologically.[6] All redistricting events that took place in Colorado between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map Denver highlight
1973–1982 United States Congressional Districts in Colorado, 1972 – 1982.tif United States Congressional Districts in Colorado (metro highlight), 1973 – 1982.tif
1983–1992 United States Congressional Districts in Colorado, 1983 – 1992.tif United States Congressional Districts in Colorado (metro highlight), 1983 – 1992.tif
1993–2002 United States Congressional Districts in Colorado, 1993 – 2002.tif United States Congressional Districts in Colorado (metro highlight), 1993 – 2002.tif
2003–2013 United States Congressional Districts in Colorado, 2003 – 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Colorado (metro highlight), 2003 – 2013.tif
2013-2022 United States Congressional Districts in Colorado, since 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Colorado (metro highlight), since 2013.tif
Since 2023 Maps sent by the Colorado Independent Congressional Redistricting Commission have been approved by the Colorado Supreme Court.[7]

Obsolete districts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The national atlas". nationalatlas.gov. Archived from the original on February 22, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2014.
  2. ^ "Final Approved Congressional Plan - Sept 28, 2021". Colorado Independent Redistricting Commissions. Archived from the original on November 25, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2022 – via ArcGIS.
  3. ^ Merica, Dan; Stark, Liz (April 26, 2021). "Census Bureau announces 331 million people in US, Texas will add two congressional seats". CNN. Retrieved April 26, 2021.
  4. ^ "Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives". clerk.house.gov. Retrieved 2022-01-06.
  5. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". Cook Political Report. Retrieved 2022-01-06.
  6. ^ "Digital Boundary Definitions of United States Congressional Districts, 1789–2012". Retrieved October 18, 2014.
  7. ^ Vo, Thy (November 1, 2021). "Colorado Supreme Court approves new congressional map drawn by redistricting commission". The Colorado Sun. Archived from the original on December 3, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2022.

External links[edit]