Colorado Women's Hall of Fame

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Frances Wisebart Jacobs, philanthropist, founder of the organization that became the United Way
Golda Meir, Israel's fourth Prime Minister
Chipeta, leader and negotiator, with her husband Chief Ouray

The Colorado Women's Hall of Fame is a non-profit, volunteer organization that recognizes women who have contributed to the history of the U.S. state of Colorado. As of 2016, 152 women have been inducted.

History[edit]

There was a short-lived recognition program established in Colorado in 1965 to honor the contributions of women to the state, known as the Colorado Women of Achievement awards. Each year, three honorees from throughout the state who had distinguished themselves in their profession or avocation were recognized at an annual banquet held in Denver, given a cash award, and received a pin with the emblem of the program, which was sponsored by the Columbia Savings and Loan Association.[1] The 1965 inductees, honored in 1966, included Verona Burkhard, Jo Eleanor Elliott and Sister Frances Marie Walsh.[2] In 1967 the inductees for the 1966 award were Sabina O’Malley, Elizabeth McAulliffe Calabrese, and Genevieve Fiore.[3] In 1968, the honorees for 1967 were recognized. They included Rena Mary Taylor, Marion M. Maresh, Mrs. E. Ray Campbell. Two Life Award recipients, honoring a life-long commitment of service, were given to Mary M. McDonald and Ella Matty Orman.[4] 1968 inductees, recognized in 1969 were Anna M. Garnett, Betty Pellet, Margaret Rossi, with Ruby Lewis Neal being recognized with the Life Award.[5]

Almost two decades later, a new recognition program began. The Hall of Fame organization was founded and incorporated as a non-profit organization in 1984 to recognize women's contributions to the territory and state of Colorado and to provide role-models for young girls and women. Serving on the board also offers leadership opportunities for women. Discussed conceptually in February 1984, it was organized by June of the same year. M.L. Hanson sat as the president on the board until 1997.[6]

Criteria[edit]

The criteria for induction into the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame is that women have "significant ties to Colorado and during their lifetimes:

  • Made significant and enduring contributions to their fields of endeavor
  • Elevated the status of women
  • Helped open new frontiers for women and for society in general
  • Inspired others by their example"[7]

Inductees[edit]

Up to 10 inductees are admitted to the Hall of Fame every evenly numbered year.[8]

Colorado Women's Hall of Fame
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement Ref(s)
Leslie Foster (b. 1957) 2018 Community activism [9]
Gerie Grimes (b. 1950) 2018 Community Service [10]
Susan Helms Helms sj4.jpg (b. 1958) 2018 NASA Astronaut aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour [11]
Dorothy Horrell (b. 1951) 2018 Chancellor of CU Denver [12]
Fay Matsukage (b. 1955) 2018 Corporate and securities lawyer [13]
Gail Schoettler (b. 1943) 2018 44th Lieutenant Governor of Colorado [14]
Anna Jo Haynes 2016 Civil rights activist who brought the national Head Start Program to Denver; President Emeritus, Mile High Montessori Early Learning Centers [15]
Arlene Vigil Kramer 2016 Educator and pioneer of bilingual education [16]
Lydia Peña 2016 Catholic nun, educator and author who champions education for girls in Afghanistan and Ghana; founding member of the Rose Community Foundation [17]
Sandra I. Rothenberg 2016 Appellate court judge and sex discrimination litigation pioneer [18]
Shari Shink 2016 Attorney, advocate for abused and neglected children. Founded the Rocky Mountain Children's Law Center [19]
Judith Wagner 2016 Co-founder of both the Colorado Women's Foundation and the Women's Bank [20]
Anne Evans (1871–1941) 2015 American arts activist who devoted her life to the founding and support of some of Colorado's largest cultural institutions, including the Denver Art Museum, the Central City Opera, and the Denver Civic Center [21]
Minnie Harding 2015 Philanthropist and charter member of the Colorado Federation of Women's Clubs. [22]
Laura Hershey (1962–2010) 2015 Author, activist and advocate for the disabled community. [23]
Elizabeth Pellet 2015 First woman minority leader in Colorado State Legislature. [24]
Christine Arguello (b. 1955) 2014 Federal judge on the United States District Court for the District of Colorado and is a former Colorado state official [25]
Morley Cowles Ballantine (1925–2009) 2014 Newspaper publisher, philanthropist [26]
Lauren Young Casteel (b. 1953) 2014 First black woman to head a foundation in Colorado [27]
Penny Rafferty Hamilton (b. 1948) 2014 Pilot, educator, co-holder of World Aviation Speed Record, set October 22, 1991 [28]
Julia Archibald Holmes JuliaArchibaldHolmes.jpg (1838–1887) 2014 First woman to climb Pikes Peak [29]
Elizabeth Wright Ingraham (1922–2013) 2014 Architect [30]
Kristina Johnson 2014 Optoelectronic processing systems, 3D imaging, and color management systems [31]
Joanne Maguire (b. 1954) 2014 Aerospace engineer [32]
Helen Ring Robinson Helen Ring Robinson.jpeg (1878–1923) 2014 Journalist, suffragist, and the first woman elected to the Colorado State Senate [33]
Diana Wall (b. 1950) 2014 Soil invertebrate diversity expert [34]
Kristi S. Anseth 2012 Tisone Professor and Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Colorado at Boulder [35]
Janet Bonnema (1938–2008) 2012 Transportation engineer for the Colorado Highway Department; won a 1972 sexual discrimination lawsuit against the Colorado Department of Highways when she was barred from working inside the Eisenhower Tunnel. [36]
Fannie Mae Duncan (1918–2005) 2012 Owner of The Cotton Club bar in Colorado Springs [37]
Loretta Ford (b. 1920) 2012 Dean of the University of Rochester School of Nursing (1972–1985), co-founded the nurse-practitioner model at the University of Colorado in 1965 [38]
Erinea Garcia Gallegos (1903–2002) 2012 Educator and San Luis Valley postmaster [39]
Laura Gilpin (1891–1979) 2012 Photographer known for her portraits of Native Americans, particularly the Navajo and Pueblo, and her Southwestern landscapes [40]
Temple Grandin TempleGrandin.jpg (b. 1947) 2012 Doctor of animal science and professor at Colorado State University, bestselling author, and consultant to the livestock industry on animal behavior [41]
Ding-Wen Hsu (b. 1948) 2012 Co-founder and majority shareholder of Pacific Western Technologies [42]
Mary Ann Kerwin (b. 1931) 2012 Co-founder of La Leche League International; women's health advocate [43]
Mary J. Mullarkey 2012 Colorado Supreme Court Chief Justice [44]
Madeleine Albright Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.jpg (b. 1937) 2010 First woman to become the United States Secretary of State [45]
Elinor Miller Greenberg (b. 1932) 2010 Adult educator and author [46]
Maria Guajardo (b. 1959) 2010 Executive director of the Latin American Research and Service Agency [47]
Philippa Marrack (b. 1945) 2010 Biologist known for her research into T cell development, T cell apoptosis and survival, adjuvants, autoimmune disease, and for identifying superantigens, the mechanism behind toxic shock syndrome. [48]
Ramona Martinez (b. 1943) 2010 Businesswoman and former president of the Denver City Council; member of the Democratic National Committee since the 1990s [49]
Hattie McDaniel 1941hattie.jpg (1895–1952) 2010 American actress and first African-American to win an Academy Award for her role in Gone with the Wind [50]
Susan O'Brien (1939–2003) 2010 First female television news director in Denver [51]
Bartley Marie Scott (1896–1979) 2010 Rancher and conservationist [52]
Alice Bemis Taylor (1877–1942) 2010 Philanthropist [53]
Jill S. Tietjen (b. 1954) 2010 Author, electrical engineer [54]
Sue Anschutz-Rodgers (b. 1936) 2008 Cattle rancher, philanthropist [55]
Alicia Cuarón (b. 1939) 2008 Mexican-American educator, human rights activist, and prominent Latina leader who became a Franciscan nun after a successful business career [56]
Evie Dennis (b. 1924) 2008 Education and athletics advocate; Sportswomen of Colorado Hall of Fame 1997; Laureate of the Association of National Olympic Committees 1999; United States Track and Field Hall of Fame 2004 [57]
Jean Dubofsky (b. 1942) 2008 First woman to become a Colorado Supreme Court Justice, former Deputy Attorney General for Colorado [58]
Katherine Keating (1922–2009) 2008 First woman in the United States Navy to rise from Seaman Recruit to Captain [59]
Mary Lou Makepeace (b. 1940) 2008 Colorado Springs' first female mayor [60]
Lily Nie (b. 1963) 2008 Founder of Chinese Children Adoption International, Chinese Children Charity Fund, and the Joyous Chinese Cultural School [61]
Anna Petteys (1892–1970) 2008 First woman to be elected to the Colorado Board of Education [62]
Eliza Routt Eliza Pickrell Routt.tif (1839–1907) 2008 Suffragist and Colorado’s first First Lady alongside John Routt [63]
Rhea Woltman (b. 1927) 2008 Pilot and one of the First Lady Astronaut Trainees for the Mercury project [64]
Mildred Didrikson Zaharias Babe Didrikson Zaharias 1938cr.jpg (1911–1956) 2008 Athlete who achieved outstanding success in golf, basketball, and track and field. She was named the 10th Greatest North American Athlete of the 20th Century by ESPN, and the 9th Greatest Athlete of the 20th Century by the Associated Press. [65]
Stephanie Allen (b. 1937) 2006 Founder of the Colorado Women’s Coalition; founded Women’s Vision Foundation to develop leadership skills among women; first woman recipient of the Dan Ritchie Award for Ethics in Business; Businesswoman, women's advocate, and civic leader; [66]
Judy Collins Judycollins 20090205.jpg (b. 1939) 2006 Singer-songwriter [67]
Marion Downs (1914–2014) 2006 Audiologist and professor at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center who pioneered universal newborn hearing screening [68]
Clarissa Pinkola Estés (b. 1945) 2006 American poet, post-trauma specialist and Jungian psychoanalyst [69]
Arlene Hirschfeld (b. 1944) 2006 Community leader, philanthropist, and activist [70]
Jean Jones (b. 1942) 2006 President and CEO of Girl Scouts – Mile Hi Council [71]
Fannie Lorber (1881–1958) 2006 Founder of the Denver Sheltering Home [72]
Susan Solomon Susan Solomon-Desk With Globe.jpg (b. 1956) 2006 Atmospheric chemist working for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [73]
Caroline Spencer Dr. Caroline Spencer 275029v.jpg (1861–1928) 2006 Suffragist and physician [74]
Vivien Spitz (1924–2014) 2006 Court reporter at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials [75]
Anna Lee Aldred (1921–2006) 2004 First woman in the United States to receive a jockey's license [76]
Louie Croft Boyd (1871–1951) 2004 Helped found the Colorado State Trained Nurses Association [77]
Merle Chambers (b. 1946) 2004 Philanthropist, businesswoman, and lawyer [78]
Patricia A. Gabow (b. 1944) 2004 CEO of Denver Health and Hospital Authority [79]
Carlotta LaNier (b. 1942) 2004 The youngest of the Little Rock Nine, a group of African-American students who, in 1957, were the first black students ever to attend classes at Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. Now a Colorado real estate broker [80]
Portia Mansfield (1887–1979) 2004 Along with Charlotte Perry, co-founder of the Perry-Mansfield Performing Arts School & Camp [81]
Carol Mutter Carol Mutter Feb 2014.jpg (b. 1945) 2004 First woman in the United States Marines Corps to be promoted to both major general and lieutenant general [82]
Antoinette Perry-Frueauff (1888–1946) 2004 Actress and director [83]
Charlotte Perry (1889–1983) 2004 Along with Portia Mansfield, co-founder of the Perry-Mansfield Performing Arts School & Camp [84]
Arie Parks Taylor (1927–2003) 2004 Public servant and community leader [85]
Linda G. Alvarado (b. 1950) 2002 President and CEO of Alvarado Construction [86]
Virginia Fraser (1928–2011) 2002 Advocate for women's rights and the elderly [87]
Gudy Gaskill (1927-2016) 2002 Outdoorswoman and organizer of the Colorado Trail [88]
Jo Ann Cram Joselyn (b. 1943) 2002 First woman and first American to serve as Secretary General for the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics [89]
Mary Miller Mary E. Miller.jpg (1842–1921) 2002 Mary was the founder of Lafayette, Colorado [90]
Sue Miller (1934–2017) 2002 Fashion model and breast cancer survivor who founded the Sue Miller Day of Caring [91]
Gloria Tanner (b. 1935) 2002 First African American woman to serve in the Colorado State Senate [92]
Emily Howell Warner (b. 1939) 2002 First woman hired as a pilot by a major U.S. airline [93]
Polly Baca (b. 1941) 2000 First woman to Chair the Democratic Caucus of the Colorado House of Representatives (1976–79) and the first Latina elected to the Colorado State Senate [94]
Joy S. Burns 2000 President of the Burnsley Hotel in Denver [95]
Josie Heath (b. 1937) 2000 President of the Community Foundation serving Boulder County; Democratic nominee for the U.S. Senate in 1990 and 1992; community activist and educator [96]
J. Virginia Lincoln (1915–2003) 2000 Director of the World Data Center A for Solar-Terrestrial Physics [97]
Pauline Short Robinson (1915–1997) 2000 First African-American librarian in Denver [98]
Martha M. Urioste (b. 1937) 2000 Montessori educator [a]
Zita Weinshienk (b. 1933) 2000 United States federal judge [100]
Susan Anderson Susan Anderson.jpg (1870–1960) 1997 Frontier doctor [101]
Eppie Archuleta (1922–2014) 1997 Folk artist [102]
Ceal Barry (b. 1955) 1997 Women's basketball coach [103]
Juana Bordas (b. 1942) 1997 President of the National Hispana Leadership Institute, Peace Corps volunteer and advocate for women [104]
Swanee Hunt Swanee Hunt.jpg (b. 1950) 1997 Founding director of the Women and Public Policy Program (WAPPP) at the Kennedy School, and former United States Ambassador to Austria [105]
Reynelda Muse (b. 1947) 1997 First woman and first African-American to anchor a newscast in Colorado [106]
Mary Luke Tobin (1908–2006) 1997 American Roman Catholic Religious Sister [107]
Joan Birkland (b. 1928) 1996 Athlete and organizer [108]
Elise M. Boulding (1920–2010) 1996 Quaker sociologist and major contributor to creating the academic discipline of Peace and Conflict Studies [109]
Dana Hudkins Crawford (1920–2010) 1996 Historic preservationist and developer [110]
Margaret L. Curry (1898–1986) 1996 Parole officer and advocate for women prisoners [111]
Terri H. Finkel (b. 1953) 1996 Researcher into auto-immunity, AIDS, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and cancer [112]
Elnora M. Gilfoyle (b. 1934) 1996 Occupational therapist and advocate for those with disabilities [113]
Mary Elitch Long Mary Elitch Long.jpg (1856–1936) 1996 Businesswoman and one of the original owners of Elitch Gardens [114]
Frances McConnell-Mills (1899–1974) 1996 Denver’s first city toxicologist and perhaps the first female forensic pathologist in the United States [115]
Rachel Bassette Noel (1918–2008) 1996 African American educator, politician and civil rights leader; namesake of Rachel B. Noel Middle School [116]
Marilyn Van Derbur MarilynVanDerbur.jpeg (b. 1937) 1996 1958 Miss America pageant holder and founder of the American Coalition for Abuse Awareness and One Voice [117]
Mildred Pitts Walter (b. 1922) 1996 Author, activist, educator, and women's advocate [118]
Helen Marie Black (1896–1988) 1991 Founder of the Denver Symphony Orchestra [119]
Genevieve Fiore (1912–2002) 1991 Humanitarian and peace activist [120]
Augusta Tabor Augusta Pierce Tabor.jpg (1833–1905) 1991 Entrepreneur, first wife of silver king Horace Tabor [121]
Wilma Webb (b. 1944) 1991 Member of the Colorado State Legislature from 1980 to 1993; the first First Lady of Denver to have held political office herself [122]
Caroline Bancroft (1900–1985) 1990 Journalist, former Ziegfeld Follies performer [123]
Hendrika B. Cantwell (b. 1925) 1990 Advocate for neglected and abused children [124]
Sarah Platt-Decker Sarah S. Platt-Decker.jpg (1855-1912) 1990 Suffragette and advocate for women's rights [125]
Jane Silverstein Ries (1909–2005) 1990 First female landscape architect in Denver [126]
Clara Brown History char cbrown.jpg (c. 1800–1885) 1989 Aided the settlement of former slaves during Colorado's Gold Rush [127]
Edwina Hume Fallis (1876–1957) 1989 Author [128]
Sumiko Hennessy (b. 1937) 1989 Founding board member and executive director of the Asian Pacific Development Center in Denver [129]
Cleo Parker Robinson (b. 1948) 1989 Choreographer and artistic director of the Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble [130]
Caroline Nichols Churchill Caroline Nichols Churchill.jpg (1833–1926) 1988 Feminist writer [131]
Oleta Crain (1913–2007) 1988 Major in the U.S. Army, regional administrator of the Women’s Bureau for the U.S. Department of Labor [132]
B.LaRae Orullian (b. 1933) 1988 Founding president and chief executive office of the Women’s Bank in Denver [133]
Elizabeth Hickok Robbins Stone Elizabeth Hickok Robbins Stone.jpg (1801–1895) 1988 Ran the first hotel in the Fort Collins area, serving Overland Trail travelers. She financed and initiated businesses to support the growth in and around the area. [134]
Miriam Goldberg (1916–2017) 1987 Publisher of the Intermountain Jewish News [135]
Frances Wisebart Jacobs Frances Wisebart Jacobs.jpg (1843–1892) 1987 School teacher and philanthropist who founded the United Way [136]
Mary Florence Lathrop (1865–1951) 1987 Journalist and lawyer; first woman to try a case before the Colorado Supreme Court [137]
Lenore E. Walker (b. 1942) 1987 Founder of the Domestic Violence Institute [138]
Antonia Brico Bundesarchiv Bild 102-09203, Antonia Brico.jpg (1902–1989) 1986 Conductor and pianist [139]
Helen White Peterson (1915–2000) 1986 First Native American woman director of the National Congress of American Indians [140]
Josephine Roche Josephine Roche.jpg (1886–1976) 1986 Humanitarian, industrialist, activist, and politician [141]
Eudochia Bell Smith (1887–1977) 1986 Newspaper editor, Colorado legislator, and registrar of Denver's US District Land Office [142]
Lena Lovato Archuleta (1920–2011) 1985 Colorado educator, first Latina principal in the Denver Public Schools [143]
Isabella Bird Isabella Bird.jpg (1831–1904) 1985 Explorer, writer, and natural historian [144]
Helen Bonfils (1889–1972) 1985 Arts patron, philanthropist, managed the Denver Post [145]
Molly Brown Margaret Brown, 3qtr view, with chair.jpg (1867–1932) 1985 Socialite, philanthropist, and activist who became famous due to her survival of the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic [146]
Chipeta Chipeta (Ute Tribe).jpg (1843/4–1924) 1985 Second wife of Chief Ouray of the Uncompahgre Ute tribe, she led her people after his death in 1880. Chipeta used diplomacy to try to achieve peace with the white immigrants to Colorado and often represented the Utes as a delegate to lobby the US Congress [147]
Mary Coyle Chase Mary Coyle Chase.jpg (1906–1981) 1985 Journalist, playwright and screenwriter, known primarily for writing the Broadway play Harvey [148]
Mamie Eisenhower Mamie Eisenhower color photo portrait, White House, May 1954.jpg (1896–1979) 1985 Wife of President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and First Lady of the United States from 1953 to 1961 [149]
Justina Ford Justina Ford.jpg (1871–1952) 1985 Denver's first black woman physician [150]
Emily Griffith (1868–1947) 1985 Pioneer of adult education, founder of the Emily Griffith Opportunity School [151]
Helen Hunt Jackson Helen Hunt Jackson NYPL.jpg (1830–1885) 1985 Writer who became an activist on behalf of improved treatment of Native Americans by the U.S. government [152]
Dottie Lamm (b. 1937) 1985 Former First Lady of Colorado, ran for the U. S. Senate against Ben Nighthorse Campbell [153]
Martha Maxwell Martha Maxwell in the field CDV.jpg (1831–1881) 1985 Self-educated naturalist and artist who helped found modern taxidermy [154]
Golda Meir Golda Meir 03265u.jpg (1898–1978) 1985 Teacher, kibbutznik and politician who became the fourth Prime Minister of Israel [155]
Owl Woman Owl Woman.jpg (1828–1847) 1985 Cheyenne princess who managed relations between Native American tribes and Anglo American men [156]
Mary Rippon (1850–1935) 1985 One of the first women to become faculty at a university; taught at the University of Colorado in Boulder [157]
Florence Sabin Florence Sabin 1922-09-01.jpg (1871–1953) 1985 Medical scientist. She was a pioneer for women in science; she was the first woman to hold a full professorship at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the first woman elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and the first woman to head a department at the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. In her retirement years, she pursued a second career as a public health activist in Colorado, and in 1951 received a Lasker Award for this work. [158]
Hazel Schmoll (1890–1990) 1985 Colorado botanist who conducted the first systematic study of plant life in Southwestern Colorado [159]
Pat Schroeder Patschroeder.jpg (b. 1940) 1985 Democratic politician who represented Colorado in the United States House of Representatives from 1973–1997 [160]
May Bonfils Stanton (1883–1962) 1985 Philanthropist [161]
Anne Steinbeck (b. 1929) 1985 First Colorado woman to serve as president of the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs [162]
Ruth Stockton (1916–1990) 1985 Legislator; first woman president pro-tem of the Colorado State Senate [163]
Baby Doe Tabor Baby Doe Tabor.jpg (1854–1935) 1985 Second wife of Colorado businessman Horace Tabor and inspiration for the opera The Ballad of Baby Doe [164]
Hannah Marie Wormington (1914–1994) 1985 Archaeologist and author; first woman to obtain a doctorate in anthropology at Harvard and the first archaeologist and first woman to receive a Guggenheim Foundation fellowship [165]
Jean Yancey (1914–2000) 1985 Women's small business consultant and motivational speaker [166]

Notes[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Her year of birth is stated as 1936 on the Colorado Women's Hall of Fame website, but it is actually 1937.[citation needed][99]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Four Named Advisors for "Women of Achievement"". Colorado Springs, Colorado: Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. October 6, 1968. p. 18. Retrieved 22 July 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ "Three Women Named 'Women of Achievement'". Colorado Springs, Colorado: Colorado Springs Gazette-Telegraph. April 18, 1966. p. 6. Retrieved 22 July 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ "Women of Achievement for Colorado to Be Honored". Colorado Springs, Colorado: Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. March 15, 1967. p. 14. Retrieved 22 July 2016 – via Newspaperarchive.com. open access
  4. ^ "Women of Achievement Awards to be Saturday". Colorado Springs, Colorado: Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. June 11, 1968. p. 9. Retrieved 22 July 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  5. ^ "Women of Achievement Were Named". Colorado Springs, Colorado: Colorado Springs Gazette Telegraph. April 7, 1969. p. 10. Retrieved 22 July 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  6. ^ Varnell, Jeanne (1999). Women of Consequence: The Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Boulder: Johnson Press. pp. xi–xiv. ISBN 1-55566-214-5.
  7. ^ "Colorado Women's Hall of Fame". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. 2003–2011. Retrieved June 15, 2011.
  8. ^ "Honorees By Year of Induction". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. 2003–2011. Retrieved 2011-07-06.
  9. ^ "Leslie Foster". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  10. ^ "Geraldine Grimes". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  11. ^ "LIEUTENANT GENERAL SUSAN J. HELMS - U.S. Air Force". U.S. Air Force. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  12. ^ "Dorothy Ortner Horrell, PhD". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  13. ^ "Fay Matsukage". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  14. ^ "Gail Schoettler". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  15. ^ "Board of Directors Anna Jo Haynes". Denver Preschool Program. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  16. ^ "Arlene Vigil Kramer". KUVOKVJZ. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  17. ^ "Founding Trustees". Rose Community Foundation. Retrieved February 10, 2016."Lydia Peña To Be Honored by Colorado Women's Hall of Fame". Loretto Community. December 2, 2015. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  18. ^ "Colorado Court of Appeals Judges Sandra Rotherbberg and Jo Ann Vogt retiring" (PDF). Colorado Judicial Branch News. June 23, 2008. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  19. ^ "Meet the Speaker:Shari Shink". Camp Experience. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  20. ^ "Judith Buck Wagner". BOETTCHER FOUNDATION. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  21. ^ "Anne Evans". Colorado Business Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  22. ^ Alexander, Rachel (February 21, 2012). "The makings of an influential group". Cañon City Daily Record. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  23. ^ Ingold, John. "Laura Hershey, 48, championed disability rights". The Denver Post. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  24. ^ Hendee, Caitlin (October 21, 2015). "Meet the 2015 Colorado Women's Hall of Fame inductees". Denver Business Journal.
  25. ^ "Arguello, Christine M." Federal Judicial Center. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  26. ^ "Elizabeth Morley Cowles". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  27. ^ "Lauren Young Casteel". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  28. ^ "Penny Hamilton, PhD". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  29. ^ Robertson (2003), pp. 2–7, 18
  30. ^ "Elizabeth Wright Ingraham". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  31. ^ "Kristina M. Johnson Polarization-Control Technology Patent No. 5,132,826". National Inventors Hall of Fame. Archived from the original on February 4, 2015. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  32. ^ "Joanne Maguire". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  33. ^ Mead (2004), p. 70
  34. ^ Handy, Ryan (April 29, 2014). "Diana Wall: A research star is born star in Antarctica". USA Today. Coloradoan. Retrieved February 9, 2015.
  35. ^ Hill, Natalie (February 22, 2015). "People on the Move". McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  36. ^ "Janet Petra Bonnema". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  37. ^ "Fannie Mae Duncan". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  38. ^ "papers of loretta c. ford". Edward G. Miner Library. University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  39. ^ "Erinea Garcia Gallegos". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  40. ^ Loughery, John (Autumn 1989). "Reviewed Work: Laura Gilpin: An Enduring Grace by Martha A. Sandweiss". Woman's Art Journal. Woman's Art Inc. 10 (2): 51–52. JSTOR 1358223.
  41. ^ "Grandin, Temple". The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. The Columbia University Press – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  42. ^ "Ding-Wen Hsu". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  43. ^ "Mary Ann Kerwin". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  44. ^ "Mary J. Mullarkey". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  45. ^ "Madeleine Korbel Albright U.S. Secretary of State biography". U. S. Department of State. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  46. ^ "Elinor Greenberg". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  47. ^ "Maria Guajardo". Brooks International. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  48. ^ Rennie, J. (1992) Profile: Philippa Marrack and John Kappler – Keeping It In the Family, Scientific American 267(2), 43–44.
  49. ^ "Ramona Martinez". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  50. ^ Britt, Bruce (November–December 2005). "Finally in the Spotlight: Hattie McDaniel, Pioneering Black Actress". The Crisis. The Crisis Publishing Company – via Questia (subscription required). 112 (6): 50.
  51. ^ "Susan O'Brien". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  52. ^ "Bartley Marie Scottl". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  53. ^ "Alice Bemis Taylor". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  54. ^ DeMatteo, Ann (March 29, 2012). "Women Were Business Trailblazers, Too?". New Haven Register – via Questia (subscription required). Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  55. ^ "Sue Anschutz-Rodgers". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 8, 2016.
  56. ^ O'Connor, Colleen (June 6, 2014). "Sister Alicia Cuaron, 75, leaves Bienestar Family Services in Denver". The Denver Post. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  57. ^ "Evie Garrett Dennis". The HistoryMakers. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  58. ^ "Jean Dubofsky". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 9, 2016.
  59. ^ "Katherine Keating". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  60. ^ Vogrin, Bill (December 18, 2013). "Side Streets: Mayor Mary Lou Makepeace was a downtown Colorado Springs champion". Colorado Springs Gazette. The Gazette. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  61. ^ "Lily Nie". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  62. ^ "Anna Petteysl". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  63. ^ Mead (2004), p. 64
  64. ^ "Rhea Woltman". Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 10, 2016.
  65. ^ Nelson, Mariah Burton (October 1995). "Reviewed Work: Babe: The Life and Legend of Babe Didrikson Zaharias by Susan E. Cayleff". The Women's Review of Books. Old City Publishing Inc. 13 (1): 10. JSTOR 4022203.
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References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Albright, Madeleine Korbel; Woodward, William (2003). Madam Secretary. New York, NY: Miramax Books. ISBN 978-1-4013-9947-4.
  • Bird, Isabella (2010). The Golden Chersonese and the Way Thither. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-1-108-01473-1.
  • Gilfoyle, Elnora M.; Grady, Ann P.; Moore, Josephine C. (1990). Children Adapt: A Theory of Sensorimotor-sensory Development. Thorofare, NJ: Slack Inc. ISBN 1-55642-187-7.
  • Susan, Solomon; Manning, Martin (March 14, 2008). "Editorial: The IPCC Must Maintain Its Rigor". Science. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 319 (5869): 1457. JSTOR 20053546.
  • Varnell, Jeanne; Hanson, M. L. (1999). Women of Consequence: The Colorado Women's Hall of Fame. Boulder, CO: Johnson Books. ISBN 1-55566-213-7.

External links[edit]