Columbia Missourian

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Columbia Missourian
ColumbiaMissourian.png
Type Daily newspaper
Format Print and digital
Owner(s) Missourian Publishing Association
Publisher Dean David Kurpius
Editor Tom Warhover
Managing editors Jeanne Abbott
Opinion editor Laura Johnston
Sports editor Greg Bowers
Photo editor Brian Kratzer
Founded 1908
Language English
Headquarters 221 S. Eighth Street
Columbia, Missouri 65201
Circulation 39,000[1]
ISSN 0747-1874
OCLC number 10632065
Website www.columbiamissourian.com

The Columbia Missourian is a daily newspaper in Columbia, Missouri, published five days a week in print and seven days a week on columbiamissourian.com. The newspaper is affiliated with the Missouri School of Journalism, the world’s first school of journalism, and is owned as a 501c3 non-profit under the Missourian Publishing Association. Students enrolled in staff classes produce the newspaper, which is managed by working professionals who also serve as professors.

History[edit]

The Columbia Missourian headquarters.

A former member of the University of Missouri Board of Curators and the Missouri School of Journalism's first dean, Walter Williams helped establish the Missouri School of Journalism in 1908. The first issue of the Columbia Missourian was printed on the day that classes started, September 14, 1908. [2]

Prior to his appointment as dean of the Journalism School, Williams worked at several newspapers in Boonville, served as president of the Missouri Press Association and was eventually offered a position as editor of the Columbia Herald. He faced much resistance of the prospects of a journalism school from editorial boards across the state, but when he was appointed by Governor Lon V. Stephens to the Board of Curators in 1899, a school of journalism became a more likely prospect.

In 1959, construction began on a new headquarters for the Columbia Missourian. The addition to Jay H. Neff Hall included 19,000 square feet (1,800 m2) of floor space with newsroom, composing room, and press room. The new headquarters was dedicated in May 1962.[3]

On September 19, 1968, the Columbia Missourian switched from afternoon to morning delivery. The change was originally opposed by Dean Earl English for fear that students would abandon coursework and spend all night working on the newspaper. Printers also threatened to quit because of the change in printing schedule.[4]

In 1970, the Missourian obtained four federally licensed press-radio units. The radios had a range of 30 miles (48 km) and enabled students to learn of new assignments without returning to the newsroom, and they were used heavily in field reporting.[5]

In 1985 the Missourian became the first daily newspaper in the world to use a local-area network for production, and in 1986 the Missourian became the first newspaper in the state of Missouri to install a computerized pagination system. The $250,000 system eliminated hands-on page designing.[6]

In 1992, the Missourian became one of the first newspapers in the world to offer content in a digital format as well as the traditional print format.[7]

On April 18, 1995, Lee Hills Hall was dedicated as the new home of the Columbia Missourian. The new headquarters was funded by approximately $5 million in gifts from former Missouri journalism student Lee Hills, who served as the first president of the Knight Ridder news service.[8]

Today, the newspaper is a web-first publication with a print edition published five days a week.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Columbia Missourian. "About the Missourian". Columbia Missourian. 
  2. ^ Columbia Missourian. "About the Missourian". Columbia Missourian. 
  3. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 
  4. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 
  5. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 
  6. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 
  7. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 
  8. ^ "J-School Legacy". Missouri School of Journalism. 

External links[edit]