Colusa, California

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City of Colusa
City
Colusa City Hall
Colusa City Hall
Location in Colusa County and the state of California
Location in Colusa County and the state of California
City of Colusa is located in the US
City of Colusa
City of Colusa
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°12′52″N 122°00′34″W / 39.21444°N 122.00944°W / 39.21444; -122.00944Coordinates: 39°12′52″N 122°00′34″W / 39.21444°N 122.00944°W / 39.21444; -122.00944
Country  United States
State  California
County Colusa
Incorporated June 16, 1868[1]
Area[2]
 • Total 1.834 sq mi (4.751 km2)
 • Land 1.834 sq mi (4.751 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)  0%
Elevation[3] 49 ft (15 m)
Population (April 1, 2010)[4]
 • Total 5,971
 • Estimate (2013)[4] 5,950
 • Density 3,300/sq mi (1,300/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 95932
Area code 530
FIPS code 06-14946
GNIS feature IDs 277602, 2410204
Website www.cityofcolusa.com

Colusa (formerly, Colusi, Colusi's, Koru, and Salmon Bend) is the county seat of Colusa County, California. The population was 5,971 at the 2010 census, up from 5,402 at the 2000 census. Colusi originates from the local Coru Indian tribe, who in the 1840s lived on the opposite side of the Sacramento River. They were peaceful people who relied on gathering nuts and berries to meet their food needs.[5]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2), all of it land. According to the United States Geological Survey, the city's location is at 39°12′52″N 122°00′34″W / 39.21444°N 122.00944°W / 39.21444; -122.00944.

Colusa is on the Sacramento River, which has a high levee so that the river is not clearly apparent from the city.

Colusa features a historic Chinatown, Carnegie Library building constructed in 1905, and an architecturally noteworthy courthouse built in a classical style, among its historically notable buildings.

Climate[edit]

According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Colusa has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csa" on climate maps.[6]

Climate data for Colusa (1948-2012)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 78
(26)
80
(27)
89
(32)
98
(37)
106
(41)
112
(44)
112
(44)
113
(45)
112
(44)
105
(41)
89
(32)
76
(24)
113
(45)
Average high °F (°C) 53.8
(12.1)
60.3
(15.7)
65.9
(18.8)
73.4
(23)
81.8
(27.7)
89.5
(31.9)
94.8
(34.9)
93.4
(34.1)
89.4
(31.9)
78.9
(26.1)
64
(18)
54.4
(12.4)
75
(24)
Average low °F (°C) 37
(3)
40.4
(4.7)
42.5
(5.8)
45.3
(7.4)
52.2
(11.2)
57.2
(14)
59.2
(15.1)
57.4
(14.1)
54
(12)
47.9
(8.8)
41.2
(5.1)
36.8
(2.7)
47.6
(8.7)
Record low °F (°C) 20
(−7)
21
(−6)
25
(−4)
26
(−3)
34
(1)
38
(3)
40
(4)
43
(6)
35
(2)
31
(−1)
22
(−6)
15
(−9)
15
(−9)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 3.45
(87.6)
2.78
(70.6)
2.12
(53.8)
1
(30)
0.56
(14.2)
0.2
(5)
0.03
(0.8)
0.07
(1.8)
0.25
(6.4)
0.93
(23.6)
2.06
(52.3)
2.76
(70.1)
16.22
(412)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.1
(0.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.3)
Average precipitation days 10 9 8 5 3 1 0 0 1 3 7 9 56
Source: WRCC[7]

Climate Events

During December 1996 - January 1997, the nearby Colusa River reached flood stage. This historic flooding event devastated the region by destroying thousands of crop acres (rice, tomatoes, alfalfa) and property. The Colusa River reached flood stage 68.67 feet on 1/3/1997.[8]

History[edit]

In 1850, Charles D. Semple purchased the Rancho Colus Mexican land grant on which Colusa was founded and called the place Salmon Bend. The town was founded, under the name Colusi, by Semple in 1850. The first post office was established the following year, 1851. The California legislature changed the town's (and the county's) name to Colusa in 1854. The town flourished due to its location on the Southern Pacific Railroad. Several travelers rest stops were established at various road distances from Colusa, including Five Mile House, Seven Mile House, Nine Mile House, Ten Mile House, Eleven Mile House, Fourteen Mile House (also called Sterling Ranch), Sixteen Mile House (at the current location of Princeton, and Seventeen Mile House. The original settlement of what became Colusa was originally placed at the site of Seven Mile House but subsequently removed to its current site in 1850.[9]

Film Production[edit]

The 1970s crime drama movie ...tick...tick...tick..., starring Jim Brown, was filmed downtown, featuring the historic courthouse. The setting of the film in Mississippi is referred to as "Colusa County."[10] The movie explores what happens when an African-American is elected sheriff for the town.

The Lynching of Hong Di[edit]

On July 10, 1887, convicted murderer Hong Di, an immigrant from China was dragged from the Colusa jail and was forced by over a hundred and fifty men through the streets of Colusa’s Chinatown, before he was hanged from the rafters of the locomotive turntable of the Colusa and Lake Railroad. Di, who had worked as a servant for Billiou family of St. Johns, California, had shot and killed his employer Julie Billiou on April 7, 1887. He was captured on May 22, 1887 near Gridley, California.[11]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,051
1880 1,779 69.3%
1890 1,336 −24.9%
1900 1,441 7.9%
1910 1,582 9.8%
1920 1,846 16.7%
1930 2,116 14.6%
1940 2,285 8.0%
1950 3,031 32.6%
1960 3,518 16.1%
1970 3,842 9.2%
1980 4,075 6.1%
1990 4,934 21.1%
2000 5,402 9.5%
2010 5,971 10.5%
Est. 2015 5,935 [12] −0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

2010[edit]

The 2010 United States Census[14] reported that Colusa had a population of 5,971. The population density was 3,255.3 people per square mile (1,256.9/km²). The racial makeup of Colusa was 3,944 (66.1%) White, 54 (0.9%) African American, 107 (1.8%) Native American, 80 (1.3%) Asian, 28 (0.5%) Pacific Islander, 1,510 (25.3%) from other races, and 248 (4.2%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3,128 persons (52.4%).

The Census reported that 5,916 people (99.1% of the population) lived in households, 4 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 51 (0.9%) were institutionalized.

There were 2,142 households, out of which 890 (41.5%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,080 (50.4%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 290 (13.5%) had a female householder with no husband present, 135 (6.3%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 128 (6.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 13 (0.6%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 555 households (25.9%) were made up of individuals and 224 (10.5%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76. There were 1,505 families (70.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.35.

The population was spread out with 1,789 people (30.0%) under the age of 18, 484 people (8.1%) aged 18 to 24, 1,566 people (26.2%) aged 25 to 44, 1,435 people (24.0%) aged 45 to 64, and 697 people (11.7%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.5 years. For every 100 females there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median value of a home was $196,400.[15] There were 2,282 housing units at an average density of 1,244.1 per square mile (480.4/km²), of which 1,191 (55.6%) were owner-occupied, and 951 (44.4%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.4%; the rental vacancy rate was 2.3%. 3,233 people (54.1% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 2,683 people (44.9%) lived in rental housing units.

2000[edit]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 5,402 people, 1,897 households, and 1,365 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,244.0 people per square mile (1,248.9/km²). There were 2,016 housing units at an average density of 1,210.7 per square mile (466.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68.7% White, 0.3% Black or African American, 1.8% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.8% Pacific Islander, 23.3% from other races, and 3.8% from two or more races. 41.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Colusa County Courthouse in 1908

There were 1,897 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.0% were non-families. 23.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the city the population was spread out with 30.2% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 20.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,250, and the median income for a family was $41,833. Males had a median income of $32,006 versus $20,510 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,251. About 14.2% of families and 17.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.0% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.

Politics[edit]

In the state legislature, Colusa is in the 4th Senate District, represented by Republican Jim Nielsen,[17] and the 3rd Assembly District, represented by Republican James Gallagher.[18] Federally, Colusa is in California's 3rd congressional district, represented by Democrat John Garamendi.[19]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date". California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved March 27, 2013. 
  2. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files – Places – California". United States Census Bureau. 
  3. ^ "Colusa". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved October 23, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Colusa (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 9, 2015. 
  5. ^ "City History - Colusa". www.cityofcolusa.com. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  6. ^ Climate Summary for Colusa, California
  7. ^ "COLUSA 2 SSW, CA (041948)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved November 29, 2015. 
  8. ^ CNRFC, NOAA's National Weather Service -. "California Nevada River Forecast Center". www.cnrfc.noaa.gov. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  9. ^ Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. p. 468. ISBN 1-884995-14-4. 
  10. ^ "...tick...tick...tick... (1970) - Overview - TCM.com". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved 2016-03-02. 
  11. ^ Kulczyk,David. (2008). California Justice: Shootouts, Lynching and Assassinations in the Golden State. Word Dancer Press. P44 ISBN 1-884995-54-3
  12. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  14. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Colusa city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014. 
  15. ^ http://www.towncharts.com/California/Housing/Colusa-city-CA-Housing-data.html
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ "Senators". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Members Assembly". State of California. Retrieved March 21, 2013. 
  19. ^ "California's 3rd Congressional District - Representatives & District Map". Civic Impulse, LLC. Retrieved March 1, 2013. 

External links[edit]