Comayagua Department

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Comayagua
Department
Comayagua in Honduras.svg
Coordinates: 14°27′N 87°38′W / 14.450°N 87.633°W / 14.450; -87.633Coordinates: 14°27′N 87°38′W / 14.450°N 87.633°W / 14.450; -87.633
Country Honduras
Municipalities21
Villages281
Founded28 June 1825[a]
SeatComayagua
Government
 • TypeDepartmental
 • GobernadorCarlos Aguiluz Madrid (2018-2022, PNH)
Area
 • Total5,120 km2 (1,980 sq mi)
Population
(2015)[1]
 • Total511,943
 • Density100/km2 (260/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC-6 (CDT)
Postal code
12101
ISO 3166 codeHN-CM
HDI (2017)0.598[2]
medium · 7th
Statistics derived from Consult INE online database: Population and Housing Census 2013[3]

Comayagua (Spanish pronunciation: [komaˈʝaɣwa]) is one of the 18 departments (departamentos) into which Honduras is divided. The departmental capital is Comayagua.

Geography[edit]

The department covers a total surface area of 5,124 km² and, in 2015, had an estimated population of 511,943 people.

Economy[edit]

Historically, the department produced gold, copper, cinnabar, asbestos, and silver. Gems were also mined, including opal and emerald. The area was also known for "fine" cattle.[4]

Municipalities[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Comayagua was one of the first 7 departments in which the national territory was divided in the first political division of Honduras in 1825.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "GeoHive - Honduras extended". Retrieved 2015. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  2. ^ "Sub-national HDI - Area Database - Global Data Lab". hdi.globaldatalab.org. Retrieved 2018-09-13.
  3. ^ "Consulta Base de datos INE en línea: Censo de Población y Vivienda 2013" [Consult INE online database: Population and Housing Census 2013]. Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) (in Spanish). El Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE). 1 August 2018. Retrieved 2018-09-13.
  4. ^ Baily, John (1850). Central America; Describing Each of the States of Guatemala, Honduras, Salvador, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. London: Trelawney Saunders. pp. 128–129.