Commerce de Paris-class ship of the line

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Commerce de Paris mp3h9492.jpg
Scale model of the Commerce de Paris
Class overview
Name: Commerce de Paris
Builders: Toulon (Commerce de Paris), Rochefort (Iéna). Plans by Jacques-Noël Sané
Operators:  French Navy
Preceded by: Océan class
Succeeded by: Valmy
In service: 15 June 1807 – April 1884
Planned: 9
Completed: 2
Cancelled: 7
General characteristics
Type: 110-gun ship of the line
Length: 60.42 m (198.2 ft)
Beam: 16.24 m (53.3 ft)
Draught: 8.12 m (26.6 ft)
Complement: 1,069 men
Armament:
Armour: Timber
Notes: Ships in class include: Commerce de Paris, Duc d'Angoulême

The Commerce de Paris class was a ship of the line class of the French Navy, designed in 1804 by Jacques-Noël Sané as a shortened version of his 118-gun Océan Class three-deckers, by removing a pair of guns from each deck. Two ships were built to this design in France. Four more were begun at Antwerp in 1810-11, but these were never completed and were broken up on the ways; three more were ordered in Holland, but these were never laid down.

Ships[edit]

Builder: Toulon shipyard
Ordered: 14 May 1804
Laid down: October 1804
Launched: 8 August 1806
Completed: May 1807
Fate: razeed in 1825. Renamed Commerce in August 1830, then Borda in December 1840 and Vulcain in August 1863; broken up in 1885.
Builder: Rochefort shipyard
Ordered: 8 May 1805
Laid down: April 1805
Launched: 30 August 1814
Completed: January 1815
Fate: Renamed Iéna in March 1815, reverting to Duc d'Angueleme in July 1815; became Iéna again in August 1830; broken up in 1886 (or 1915).
  • Monarque (never finished; renamed Wagram on 15 December 1810)
Builder: Antwerp shipyard
Ordered: early 1810 (named 23 July 1810)
Laid down: April 1810
Fate: Sold and broken up on the ways in 1814
  • Hymen (never finished)
Builder: Antwerp shipyard
Ordered: early 1810 (named 23 July 1810)
Laid down: May 1810
Fate: Sold and broken up on the ways in 1814
  • Neptune (Never finished)
Builder: Antwerp shipyard
Ordered: 15 March 1811 (named 26 August 1811)
Laid down: May 1811
Fate: Sold and broken up on the ways in 1814
  • Terrible (Never finished)
Builder: Antwerp shipyard
Ordered: 15 March 1811 (named 26 August 1811)
Laid down: June 1811
Fate: Sold and broken up on the ways in 1814

In October 1811 Napoleon asked for three 110-gun ships to be begun at Amsterdam, but only one was ordered; two more ships to be same design were ordered in 1812 to be built at Amsterdam and at Rotterdam, but none of the three was named or laid down, although prefabrication of the frame for the first had been begun during 1813.

References[edit]

  • Winfield, Rif and Roberts, Stephen (2015) French Warships in the Age of Sail 1786-1861: Design, Construction, Careers and Fates. Seaforth Publishing. ISBN 978-1-84832-204-2.

External links[edit]