Committee for Economic Development

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Committee for Economic Development
CED Torch Logo.jpg
Abbreviation CED
Formation 1942
Type nonprofit organization
Headquarters Washington, DC, United States
President
Bernard Bailey, President-Elect
Key people
  • Michael Petro
  • Joseph Minarik
Revenue (2014)
$4,699,329[1]
Expenses (2014) $4,502,539[1]
Website www.ced.org

The Committee for Economic Development of The Conference Board (CED) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, business-led public policy organization that delivers analysis and reasoned solutions to our nation’s most critical issues. CED's Trustees consist primarily of senior corporate executives from a range of U.S. industries and sectors. CED's stated aims are to sustain and promote free enterprise, improve education and healthcare, reform campaign finance, enhance corporate governance, and improve the fiscal health of the United States.[2]

History[edit]

CED was founded in 1942 by a group of business leaders led by Paul G. Hoffman, President of Studebaker Corporation; William Benton, co-founder of Benton & Bowles advertising firm; and Marion B. Folsom, treasurer of Eastman Kodak Company. CED was first formed to help the U.S. economy transition from a war-time to peace-time economy. At the end of World War II, CED successfully worked to garner support among the American business community for the Marshall Plan.[3]

Since its inception, CED has aimed to promote policies that its trustees believe will foster economic growth and development to benefit all Americans. The organization conducts research and outreach efforts in the U.S. and abroad to change policy at the local, state, and national levels. In recent decades, CED has increased access to pre-kindergarten and college, advocated campaign finance reform nationally, placed more women in corporate leadership, and reduced government spending.[4]

In January 2015, the Committee for Economic Development merged with The Conference Board, given the many synergies between the two organizations.[5] Both are non-partisan, non-lobbying, and have trustees comprised mainly from the business community. CED's trusted policy voice in the nation's capital of Washington, D.C. expands the reach of The Conference Board's research; The Conference Board's economic data further strengthens CED's policy solutions.

Leadership[edit]

CED's President-elect (effective September 2018) is Bernard Bailey.[6]Prior to Bailey, the organization's President and CEO since 2013 was Steve Odland. Michael Petro is CED's Executive Vice President,[7] and Joseph Minarik is the organization's Senior Vice President and Director of Research.[8]

Principles[edit]

The organization's work is based on seven core principles: sustainable capitalism, long-term economic growth, efficient fiscal and regulatory policy, competitive and open markets, a globally competitive workforce, equal economic opportunity, and nonpartisanship in the nation's interest.[9]

Policy research[edit]

CED conducts policy research in the following issue areas: fiscal health, education (including early childhood, K-12, and postsecondary), health care, campaign finance, women in corporate leadership, regulatory policy, immigration, infrastructure, and tax reform. CED aims to encourage American business leaders to take a more expansive view of their responsibilities by practicing what it calls "business statesmanship" — recognizing that business leaders can promote societal health by engaging in and speaking out for the common good on timely public policy issues.

In 2017, which marks CED's 75th anniversary, much of the organization's policy research was synthesized and promoted in its book, Sustaining Capitalism: Bipartisan Solutions to Restore Trust & Prosperity.[10]

Recent CED policy research:

  • How Do We Fix the Debt[11]
  • Time to Face Up[12]
  • Helping Skilled Workers Return to Work following a Career Break[13]
  • What is the 'National Debt' and Why Does It Matter[14]
  • Building Supports for Successful Transitions Into the Workforce[15]
  • Solving the Problem of Partisan Gerrymandering[16]
  • Charting a Path Forward for Charter Schools[17]
  • The Power of More Foreign-Born Workers: How Raising Immigration Levels Can Boost US Economic Growth[18]
  • Apprenticeship in Brief[19]
  • How to Reinvigorate Higher Education for the 21st Century[20]
  • Regulation & the Economy[21]
  • Trade under Attack[22]
  • Pathways to High-Quality Child Care[23]
  • The Landscape of Campaign Contributions[24]
  • Immigration Policy That Works: Bringing Foreign-Born Workers into High-Shortage Occupations to Grow Our Economy[25]
  • Fixing America's Roads & Bridges: The Path Forward[26]
  • The Economic Impact of the Food and Beverage Industry[27]
  • Corporate Income Tax Reform in 2017?[28]
  • Adjusting the Prescription: Improving the ACA[29]
  • New Mexico Business Leaders Survey[30]
  • The Federal Budget Deficit and the Public Debt: Why and How to Deal with a Lurking Problem[31]
  • Every Other One: More Women on Corporate Boards[32]
  • Interim Report: The Landscape of Campaign Contributions[33]
  • Modernizing Medicare[34]
  • Poll: Chicago Business Executives Concerned About City Government Ethics, Support Reform[35]
  • Tackling Economic Inequality, Boosting Opportunity[36]
  • Poll: New Mexico Business Leaders Concerned About Ethical Behavior of Elected Officials, Support Solutions[37]
  • Crony Capitalism, Corruption and the Economy in the State of New Mexico[38]
  • Choosing Justice? The Need for Judicial Selection Reform[39]
  • Crony Capitalism: Unhealthy Relations Between Business and Government[40]
  • Child Care in State Economies[41]
  • Adjusting the Prescription: CED Recommendations for Health Care Reform[42]
  • The Role of Business in Promoting Educational Attainment[43]
  • Poll: New Mexico Business Leaders Support Campaign Finance Reform[44]
  • How Business Leaders Can Support College- and Career-Readiness[45]
  • Boosting California’s Postsecondary Education Performance[46]
  • Survey: American Business Leaders On Campaign Finance[47]

Policy conferences[edit]

CED's policy conferences are forums for trustees, senior policy makers, and industry leaders to discuss pressing national issues that are aligned with CED’s core policy areas: the economy, education, global competitiveness, and democratic institutions. To advance reasoned solutions from business in the nation’s interest, CED convenes for two days, twice-yearly, to address these seminal economic issues. At each Conference, CED also honors a distinguished business leader with the Leadership in the Nation's Interest Award.[48]

Recent and distinguished speakers include:

2018 Leadership in the Nation's Interest Award Honoree:

Past Leadership in the Nation's Interest Award Honorees:

Distinguished Performance Awards Dinner[edit]

Held annually in New York City, the Distinguished Performance Awards Dinner recognizes business leaders who have shown leadership in their companies and the communities in which they operate.[49]

2018 Honorees:

Past Honorees:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Committee for Economic Development" (PDF). Foundation Center. Retrieved 23 March 2017. 
  2. ^ About CED
  3. ^ About CED
  4. ^ About CED
  5. ^ The Conference Board to Merge with the Committee for Economic Development
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Michael Petro
  8. ^ Joseph Minarik
  9. ^ About CED
  10. ^ Sustaining Capitalism: Bipartisan Solutions to Restore Trust & Prosperity
  11. ^ "How Do We Fix the Debt"
  12. ^ "Time to Face Up"
  13. ^ "Helping Skilled Workers Return to Work following a Career Break"
  14. ^ "What is the 'National Debt' and Why Does It Matter"
  15. ^ "Building Supports for Successful Transitions Into the Workforce"
  16. ^ "Solving the Problem of Partisan Gerrymandering"
  17. ^ "Charting a Path Forward for Charter Schools"
  18. ^ "The Power of More Foreign-Born Workers: How Raising Immigration Levels Can Boost US Economic Growth"
  19. ^ "Apprenticeship in Brief"
  20. ^ "How to Reinvigorate Higher Education for the 21st Century"
  21. ^ "Regulation & the Economy"
  22. ^ "Trade under Attack"
  23. ^ "Pathways to High-Quality Child Care"
  24. ^ "The Landscape of Campaign Contributions"
  25. ^ "Immigration Policy That Works: Bringing Foreign-Born Workers into High-Shortage Occupations to Grow Our Economy"
  26. ^ "Fixing America's Roads & Bridges: The Path Forward"
  27. ^ "The Economic Impact of the Food and Beverage Industry"
  28. ^ "Corporate Income Tax Reform in 2017?"
  29. ^ "Adjusting the Prescription: Improving the ACA"
  30. ^ "New Mexico Business Leaders Survey"
  31. ^ "The Federal Budget Deficit and the Public Debt: Why and How to Deal with a Lurking Problem"
  32. ^ "Every Other One: More Women on Corporate Boards"
  33. ^ "The Landscape of Campaign Contributions"
  34. ^ "Modernizing Medicare"
  35. ^ "Poll: Chicago Business Executives Concerned About City Government Ethics, Support Reform"
  36. ^ "Tackling Economic Inequality, Boosting Opportunity"
  37. ^ "Poll: New Mexico Business Leaders Concerned About Ethical Behavior of Elected Officials, Support Solutions"
  38. ^ "Crony Capitalism, Corruption and the Economy in the State of New Mexico"
  39. ^ "Choosing Justice? The Need for Judicial Selection Reform"
  40. ^ "Crony Capitalism: Unhealthy Relations Between Business and Government"
  41. ^ "Child Care in State Economies"
  42. ^ "Adjusting the Prescription: CED Recommendations for Health Care Reform"
  43. ^ "The Role of Business in Promoting Educational Attainment"
  44. ^ "Poll: New Mexico Business Leaders Support Campaign Finance Reform"
  45. ^ "How Business Leaders Can Support College- and Career-Readiness"
  46. ^ "Boosting California’s Postsecondary Education Performance"
  47. ^ "Survey: American Business Leaders On Campaign Finance"
  48. ^ CED Policy Conferences
  49. ^ CED Distinguished Performance Awards Dinner