Common Locale Data Repository

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Common Locale Data Repository
Developed byUnicode Consortium
Initial releaseCLDR 1.0
(19 December 2003; 20 years ago (2003-12-19)[1])
Latest release
44.1[2] Edit this on Wikidata
7 December 2023; 2 months ago (7 December 2023)
Container forXML[3]
Websitecldr.unicode.org

The Common Locale Data Repository (CLDR) is a project of the Unicode Consortium to provide locale data in XML format for use in computer applications. CLDR contains locale-specific information that an operating system will typically provide to applications. CLDR is written in the Locale Data Markup Language (LDML).

Details[edit]

Among the types of data that CLDR includes are the following:

  • Translations for language names
  • Translations for territory and country names
  • Translations for currency names, including singular/plural modifications
  • Translations for weekday, month, era, period of day, in full and abbreviated forms
  • Translations for time zones and example cities (or similar) for time zones
  • Translations for calendar fields
  • Patterns for formatting/parsing dates or times of day
  • Exemplar sets of characters used for writing the language
  • Patterns for formatting/parsing numbers
  • Rules for language-adapted collation
  • Rules for spelling out numbers as words
  • Rules for formatting numbers in traditional numeral systems (such as Roman and Armenian numerals)
  • Rules for transliteration between scripts, much of it based on BGN/PCGN romanization

The information is currently used in International Components for Unicode, Apple's macOS, LibreOffice, MediaWiki, and IBM's AIX, among other applications and operating systems.

CLDR overlaps somewhat with ISO/IEC 15897 (POSIX locales). POSIX locale information can be derived from CLDR by using some of CLDR's conversion tools.

CLDR is maintained by a technical committee which includes employees from IBM, Apple, Google, Microsoft, and some government-based organizations. The committee is chaired by John Emmons, of IBM; Mark Davis, of Google, is vice-chair.[4]

The CLDR covers 400+ languages.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ CLDR Releases/Downloads
  2. ^ "Release 44.1". 7 December 2023. Retrieved 19 December 2023.
  3. ^ Updating DTDs, CLDR makes special use of XML because of the way it is structured. In particular, the XML is designed so that you can read in a CLDR XML file and interpret it as an unordered list of <path,value> pairs, called a CLDRFile internally. These path/value pairs can be added to or deleted, and then the CLDRFile can be written back out to disk, resulting in a valid XML file. That is a very powerful mechanism, and also allows for the CLDR inheritance model.
  4. ^ "Unicode CLDR - CLDR Process".
  5. ^ "Locale Coverage".

External links[edit]