Communist Party of Belarus

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Not to be confused with Communist Party of Belorussia which existed from 1918-1920.
Communist Party of Belarus
Камуністы́чная па́ртыя Белару́сі
Коммунистическая партия Белоруссии
Secretary-General Igor Karpenko
Founded 1996
Headquarters Minsk
Membership  (2011) 6,000[1]
Ideology Communism
Marxism–Leninism
Political position Left-wing
International affiliation International Meeting of Communist and Workers' Parties
Continental affiliation Union of Communist Parties – Communist Party of the Soviet Union
House of Representatives
3 / 110
Council of the Republic
17 / 64
Local seats
265 / 21,288
Party flag
Flag of Byelorussian SSR.svg
Website
comparty.by

The Communist Party of Belarus (Belarusian: Камуністы́чная па́ртыя Белару́сі, Kamunistychnaya Partyia Belarusi; Russian: Коммунистическая партия Беларуси, Kommunisticheskaya Partiya Belarusi) is a communist party in Belarus. It was created in 1996 and supports the government of president Alexander Lukashenko.[2] The leader of the party is Tatsyana Holubeva.

Overview[edit]

The party suggested merging with the Party of Communists of Belarus (PKB) on July 15, 2006. While the Communist Party of Belarus is a pro-presidential party, the Party of Communists of Belarus was one of the major opposition parties in Belarus. According to Sergey Kalyakin, the chairman of the PKB, the so-called "re-unification" of the two parties was a plot designed to oust the opposition PKB.[3]

The main foreign policy goal of strengthening the party proclaimed national security through the development of Belarus-Russia Union State and the phase reconstruction voluntarily renewed Union nations, strengthening its political and economic independence.

As a member of the world Communist movement, the KPB enjoys relations with other communist parties in the region and throughout the world to a much greater extent than the PKB, which many in the region have considered "pro-Western."

At the 2004 parliamentary election, the KPB obtained 5.99% and 8 out of 110 seats in the House of Representatives, in 2008 merely 6 seats and even less in 2012 with 3 seats. Still, because of the party's support for President Lukashenko, 17 of its members were appointed by him in the upper house, the Council of the Republic, in 2012.

References[edit]

External links[edit]