Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist)

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Communist Party of Britain (Marxist-Leninist)
Founded 1968
Headquarters London
Newspaper Workers
Ideology Communism
Marxism–Leninism
Workerism
Hard euroscepticism
Website
Official website
Typical front cover of The Worker from the 1970s

The Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist), often abbreviated as CPB-ML, is a British Marxist-Leninist political party. It originated in 1968 as an anti-revisionist split from the Communist Party of Great Britain and was chaired by Reg Birch until 1985. The official programme of the party since 1972 has been The British Working Class and its Party. The publication of the CPB-ML was originally known as The Worker, but is today called Workers.

History[edit]

The party was formed in 1968 by Reg Birch as a Maoist, anti-revisionist breakaway from the Communist Party of Great Britain, siding with the Communist Party of China in the Sino-Soviet split.[1] The CPB(M-L) then sided with Enver Hoxha in the Sino-Albanian split of the 1970s.

A small number of members split from the party in 1975, forming the Nottingham Communist Group. In 1976, three branches of the CPB(M-L) split and formed the Communist Workers Movement, initially under the leadership of Ian Williams[2] - which group later joined the Revolutionary Communist League of Britain.

In the 1980s, the CPB(M-L) came to support the Soviet Union again for a period, before dropping this line over Mikhail Gorbachev's reforms. More recently, the CPB(M-L) has developed a national line for Britain: "Rebuild Britain"; the party is strongly opposed to the European Union.[3]

The party published The Worker from 1969 until 2000, when it became Workers.

Party members focus on work in the labour movement.

Notable members[edit]

Notable early members of the CPB(M-L) included writer William Ash MBE,[4] journalists and academics Roy Greenslade and Steve Hewlett,[2] journalist and speechwriter Ian Williams[5] and comedian and author Alexei Sayle.[6]

Positions[edit]

Europe and Brexit[edit]

The party campaigned for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union and endorsed Grassroots Out; also attending a rally alongside then UKIP leader Nigel Farage and Tory MP Peter Bone.[7] After Prime Minister Theresa May invoked Article 50 the Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist) issued a statement which called those opposed to Brexit "Enemies of the People", invoking a phrase coined by the Daily Mail. The statement also called for "taking control" of "our economy, our laws, our borders".[8]

Immigration[edit]

The Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist) is notable for its opposition to mass immigration. In a statement from 2005 in their publication Workers, the party stated that it regards the recent mass immigration from Eastern Europe into Britain as a deliberate plan by the capitalist ruling class to use "cheap labour" to "undermine the wages and conditions of British workers."[9] It also stressed concerns in the same article that this recent mass immigration was having the effect of impacting national infrastructure; schools, hospitals and transport; by overloading them, to the detriment of the indigenous working-class.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/obituary-reg-birch-1423153.html
  2. ^ a b https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/uk.hightide/high-tide.pdf
  3. ^ "Congress 2012". Communist Party of Britain (Marxist–Leninist). Retrieved 30 April 2014.
  4. ^ https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/29/bill-ash
  5. ^ https://www.marxists.org/history/erol/uk.hightide/
  6. ^ Sayle, Alexei Stalin Ate My Homework, Hachette UK, 2010, ISBN 1848945000
  7. ^ https://www.cpbml.org.uk/article-type/grassroots-out-rally
  8. ^ https://www.cpbml.org.uk/news/article-50-day-celebrate
  9. ^ a b "Migration and class power". Workers. 18 December 2016. 

External links[edit]