Company A, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment

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Company A, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment
6th FL ANV Pattern (reproduction).jpg
Regimental Colors (from ca. March/April 1864 to December 16th, 1864)
ActiveMarch 12, 1862 – April 26, 1865
Allegiance Confederate Florida
 Confederate States of America
Branch Confederate States Army
TypeCompany
RoleInfantry
Size109 aggregate (April, 1862)
Part of6th Florida Infantry Regiment
Nickname(s)Davidson's Company; Florida Guards
Equipment.577 Pattern 1853 Enfield
.69 Springfield Model 1842
EngagementsAmerican Civil War
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Captain R. H. M. Davidson: March 12, 1862 - November 16, 1863

Company A, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment was a military company of the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.

On February 2, 1862, the Confederate War Department issued a call for troops. Florida, under this newly imposed quota, would furnish two regiments and a battalion to fight for the duration of the war. The troops would rendezvous at preselected locations and there "be clothed, supplied, and armed at the expense of the Confederate States." Each enlistee would also receive a $50 bounty for volunteering.[1]

Organization[edit]

Robert Hamilton McWhorta Davidson of Gadsden County, Florida, was a state senator in 1862. He retired from this position early in 1862 to raise a company of infantry from his home county. A number of men that would serve in Company A had already obligated for 12 months of state service with either Captain R. M. Scarborough’s Company (the “Dixie Blues”) or Captain Wilk Call’s Company (the “Concordia Infantry”). The “Dixie Blues” were taken into state service in 1861. There is no record of how long or where they served; its existence is believed to have been short-lived. The “Concordia Infantry” was mustered into the service of the State by Francis L. Dancy Adjutant and Inspector General, for the term of twelve months, from the 4th day of September 1861, unless sooner discharged. As was the case with the “Dixie Blues”, its service was brief. All told, 7 men from each company would re-enlist for “3 years or the war” with R. H. M. Davidson’s Company in March 1862. Davidson’s recruiting efforts began the first week of March, 1862 at Quincy in Gadsden County, Florida, with the majority of enlistments being accomplished by the 3rd week of March.[2][3][4]

Modified image of Map of the Tri-State Area-Florida, Georgia and Alabama (ca. 1865) showing locations of Chattahoochee Arsenal, Quincy, and Rico's Bluff. (Image credit: State Archives of Florida)

Concurrently, the coastal artillery batteries located at Apalachicola were being moved farther inland in response to exchanges between Secretary of War Judah P. Benjamin, General Robert E. Lee, Governor John Milton, and Brigadier General J. H. Trapier, commanding the Department of East and Middle Florida. On March 19, 1862, General Trapier reported that the original plan to establish a battery at Fort Gadsden had been overcome by events, and been landed further up the Apalachicola River at Rico’s Bluff, some 40 miles south of Chattahoochee on the east bank of the Apalachicola River. By order of Brigadier General Trapier, Davidson’s Company along with the company of Captain S. B. Love (later Company B, 6th Florida Infantry) arrived at Rico’s Bluff about March 20 to reinforce and support the newly erected batteries; these two companies would remain at Rico’s Bluff until the regiment left the state.[1][5]

On April 10, 1862, Governor Milton informed Secretary of War George W. Randolph that the requisition for "two regiments and a half of infantry…would by the 15th instant be fully organized and subject to your orders, and companies enough have volunteered for service for three years or the war to compose three full regiments of infantry. ... to serve during the war and wherever their services may be necessary…the Sixth Regiment, at the Mount Vernon Arsenal on the Chattahoochie, will be organized on the 14th instant."[1]

About April 15, elections of field and staff officers for the 6th Florida Regiment were held, with Captain Jesse J. Finley of Company D elected to Colonel, Captain Alexander D. McLean of Company H elected to Lieutenant Colonel, and 1st Sergeant Daniel Lafayette Kenan of Company A elected to Major. The commissions became official on April 18; with the election of field officers concluded, the 8 companies at Mount Vernon Arsenal at Chattahoochee and the 2 companies at Rico's Bluff would be formally organized as the 6th Regiment of Florida Infantry.[5][6] "Davidson’s Company" would be officially designated as Company A; the men of Company A would bestow upon themselves the unofficial sobriquet of "Florida Guards".[7]

On April 23, 1862, Florida Adjutant and Inspector General Wm. H. Milton would inform Governor Milton that, "The following companies compose the Sixth Regiment, eight companies of which are at the Mount Vernon Arsenal and two at Rico’s Bluff; Magnolia State Guards, Capt. L. M. Attaway; Campbellton Greys, Capt. H. B. Grace; Jackson County Volunteers, Lieut. John B. Hayes; Jackson County Company, Capt. H. O. Bassset; Union Rebels, Capt. A. D. McLean; Choctawhatchie Volunteers, H. K. Hagan; Florida Guards, R. H. M. Davidson; Gadsden Greys, Capt. Samuel B. Love; Gulf State Infantry, Capt. James C. Evans; Washington County Company, Capt. A. McMillan, of which regiment J. J. Finley is colonel A. D. McLean lieutenant-colonel, and D. L. Kenan major."[1]

Colonel Finley was somewhat less enthusiastic concerning the organization of the 6th Florida than were Governor Milton and his Inspector General; he noted in his Regimental Return for April that, “…the names of absent officers for that month, the no. and date of order, the reasons for and commencement of absence and period assigned for the same were not reported by the companies of the Regiment. It was not until about the 20th April when or about that time the field officers were commissioned that any company report were made note. Captain Love’s and Captain Davdison’s Companies were stationed at Ricoe’s Bluff on the Apalachicola River about the 20th of March last by order of General Napier the commanding the Military Department of East and Middle Florida with the consent of the Governor… I have been compelled to make up the monthly regimental report from the morning report of companies on the 30th day of April.” His accountability issue with personnel would continue into May; he noted on his Regimental Return for that month, “Owing to the amt of sickness at this Post and the number of men on sick furlough the names of the absentees cannot be given in this Return. The Returns of Captains Evans, Love, and Davidson’s companies have been erroneously included in the Monthly Return of the 6th Florida Battalion commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Chas. [Charles] F. Hopkins.”[5]

Active Service[edit]

6th Florida Infantry Regimental Colors - Hardee Pattern (ca Late Summer 1862 - March/April 1864) with "Chickamauga" battle honor.

The 6th Florida Infantry Regiment departed the Mount Vernon Arsenal at Chattahoochee, Florida on June 13, 1862. It would serve from June through August 1862 in the Army of East Tennessee commanded by Major General Edmund Kirby Smith. The Army of East Tennessee was redesignated as the Confederate Army of Kentucky on August 25, 1862, when General Smith led it into eastern Kentucky during the Confederate Heartland Offensive. On November 20, 1862, the Army of Mississippi, General Braxton Bragg commanding, and the Army of Kentucky, General E. Kirby Smith commanding, became the Army of Tennessee. General Bragg assumed command, and General Smith was reassigned to the Department of East Tennessee. The 6th Florida would remain assigned to the Army of Tennessee for the remainder of the war (under General Braxton Bragg through December 27, 1863; under General Joseph E. Johnston from December 27, 1863 to July 18, 1864; under General John B. Hood from July 18, 1864 through January 23, 1865; under Major General Richard Taylor from January 23 to February 23, 1865: and again under General Joseph E. Johnston from February 23 to April 26, 1865.[1][6][8]

Surrender[edit]

Bennett Place - Farm home of James Bennett, where Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered his army to Union General William T. Sherman, Apr. 26, 1865. Johnston's surrender followed Lee's at Appomattox by 17 days and ended the Civil War in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida. (Image credit: Library of Congress)

From April 8 to the 10th, General Johnston reorganized the army, consolidating dozens of shrunken regiments and brigades. Containing fewer soldiers than an understrength battalion, the remnants of the Florida Brigade were united to form the 1st Florida Infantry Regiment, Consolidated - 1st Florida Infantry & 3rd Florida Infantry (consolidated)(Capt. A. B. McLeod); 1st Florida Cavalry (dismounted) and 4th Florida Infantry (consolidated) (Capt George B. Langford); 6th Florida Infantry (Lieut. Malcolm Nicholson); 7th Florida Infantry (Capt. Robert B. Smith). Company A of the original 6th Florida Infantry, along with companies B, C, and D, would be consolidated to form Company D of the 1st Consolidated Regiment of Florida Infantry.[1][5][9] On April 18, General Joseph E. Johnston signed an armistice with General William T. Sherman at Bennett’s Place near Durham, and on April 26, formally surrendered his army. Of the 100-plus men[3] who mustered into Confederate service with "Davidson's Company", only 17 were present. On May 1, 1865, five days after General Johnston surrendered the force under his command, the troops of the 1st Florida Infantry, Consolidated, were paroled.[6][10][11]

Roster[edit]

Officers[edit]

Captain Robert Hamilton McWhorta Davidson. Image credit: State Archives of Florida")
  • Captain Robert Hamilton McWhorta Davidson was born September 23, 1832 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He attended the common schools and the Quincy Academy at Quincy, Florida; then studied law at the University of Virginia at Charlottesville, Virginia. He was admitted to the bar in 1853 and commenced to practice law in Quincy, Florida. He was a member of the Florida House of Representatives from 1856 to 1857 and again from 1858 to 1859. In 1860, he was living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a lawyer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $700, and a personal worth of $6,000. He married Leila A. Callis from Virginia on January 9, 1860 at Gadsden County, Florida. Davidson was elected to the Florida State Senate and served from 1860 to 1862, retiring in the latter year to raise a company of infantry. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862, at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed to the rank of Captain. He was assigned to support a battery of artillery overlooking the Apalachicola River at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida; his recruiting efforts caused him to travel numerous times between Rico’s Bluff and Quincy. His company would be absent on duty at Rico’s Bluff when the 6th Regiment was mustered into Confederate service at Chattahoochee in mid-April. Captain Davidson was present with his company when it left the state, and remained with them until February 9, 1863, when he was detached for service to Knoxville, Tennessee as a member of an Examining Board.[12][13] He returned to the company about July 9, 1863. All Florida infantry regiments were brigaded together by General Braxton Bragg on November 12, 1863; Colonel Jesse J. Finley commanding the 6th Regiment would be elevated to command the Florida Brigade with the rank of brigadier general, Lieutenant Colonel Angus D. McLean would be promoted to Colonel and succeed him in command of the 6th Florida. Major Daniel L. Kenan would be elevated to lieutenant colonel, and Captain Davidson would be elevated to major on November 16, 1863, and serve on the field and staff of the 6th Florida Regiment. Davidson’s relief for command of Company A would be 1st Lieutenant Charles Edward Living Allison, who was promoted to captain. Davidson took ill shortly after the Battle of Missionary Ridge and was absent from his new assignment from November 23, 1863, until about January, 1864. He was present with the regiment from his return in January 1864 until the Battle of Dallas, Georgia on May 28, 1864. Just prior to an assault against prepared works occupied by the 37th and 53rd Ohio Infantry, a Federal skirmisher killed Colonel Angus McLean; Lieutenant Colonel Kenan would lead the 6th in the assault, with Major Davidson assuming Colonel Kenan’s position. During the assault, Davidson was wounded. The wound "mangled" a foot, and was so severe that he was furloughed the same day. Due to his injury he was unable to return to the front but was appointed to Lieutenant Colonel and was stationed in Quincy, Florida until the end of the war. He was paroled May 16, 1865 at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida. After the war, he resumed his law practice. He was a member of the Florida State Constitutional Convention in 1865; a presidential elector on the Greeley and Brown ticket in 1872; and in 1876 had the distinction of being the first democratic congressman elected in Florida after the war, representing 1st district of Florida to the Forty-fifth Congress and to the next six succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1877 – March 3, 1891); chairman, Committee on Railways and Canals (Forty-eighth through Fiftieth Congresses); unsuccessful candidate for re-nomination in 1890 to the Fifty-second Congress. After his term, he was member of the Florida State Railroad Commission, (1897–98) and continued to practice law. For years he was an Elder in the Presbyterian Church. Lieutenant Colonel Davidson, age 75, died January 18, 1908 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He is interred at Western Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • 1st Lieutenant Charles Edward Livingston Allison was born March 12, 1837 at Apalachicola, Franklin County Florida. He was the son of Abraham Kyrkyndal Allison (1810-1893), the sixth Governor of Florida (served 1 Apr. 1865-19 May 1865), and his first wife, Mary Jane Nathans (1820-1850). He was a freshman enrolled in South Carolina College in 1855, and then attended the University of Virginia in session 33 (1856-1857). In 1860, he was living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a lawyer and newspaper editor by profession, with a personal worth of $4,000. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed to 1st Lieutenant. He was present with the company until February 9, 1863, when he was detached for recruiting service in Florida. He also was on detached service as the Officer of City Police at Knoxville, Tennessee, beginning on April 11, 1863. He returned to the company on April 30 and remained with it until he was wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga on September 19, 1863. In that battle, he suffered a gunshot wound to the right arm, which was subsequently amputated at a hospital at Marietta, Georgia. He was promoted to Captain on November 16, 1863 while still in the hospital. He is last recorded as still absent at the hospital as of February 1864; he was paroled May 10, 1865 at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida. After the war, he established and edited a newspaper in his hometown of Quincy, FL, which he called the "Quincy Commonwealth", and developed his practice as an attorney. By 1870, the U.S. Census lists him as a “lawyer & editor.” In 1885, the Florida State Census gives his profession as “Supt. of Schools.” Allison was also instrumental in the development of the Ladies’ Confederate Memorial Association in Quincy, and was described by one lady as “always interested and one of the foremost in every work and celebration.” Captain Allison applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on May 7, 1916 at Sevier County, Arkansas.[3][4][5][14][15][16][17]
Lithograph of Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland, ca. 1861. Fort McHenry, a major site for the Union army during the Civil War, served as a processing location and Civil War prison to thousands of captured Confederate troops. It was the location of the infamous Writ of Habeas Corpus when Confederate troops were detained within the walls of the Fort without trial. Image credit: Library of Congress)
  • 2nd Lieutenant Anderson Mills Harris was born June 14, 1827 at Yorkville, South Carolina. In 1860, he was living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a clerk by profession, owning real estate in the value of $400, and a personal worth of $10,000. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 2nd Lieutenant. He was stationed at Rico’s Bluff, and was detailed to remain with the sick when the regiment left the state, and to rejoin the regiment when they were well enough to travel. He rejoined the regiment about June 30, 1862, but became ill and was left behind at Frankfort, Kentucky, in early October. He was captured by Federal forces at Frankfort on October 15, 1862 and transported to the military prison at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland and paroled from there in November 1862. He arrived in Richmond, Virginia about December 5, 1862, and was given a medical furlough of 30 days by a Doctor Peebles. He returned to the company about February 9, 1863 and remained with it until April 20, 1863 when he was detached for service as Acting Assistant Inspector General to Colonel Robert C. Trigg’s brigade. He would serve in this role until November 15, 1863 when he was appointed AAIG with the rank of 1st Lieutenant by Brigadier General Finley, who was in command of the newly formed Florida Brigade. He remained with the brigade until granted a furlough of 30 days while at Tupelo, Mississippi on January 23, 1865. On March 10, he was documented as a Captain and AAG, and sent to Richmond. He was with what remained of the Florida Brigade when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Catawba Bridge, South Carolina on May 5, 1865. After the war, he was employed as a lumber inspector. Lieutenant Harris died on November 26, 1881 at Apalachicola, Florida and is interred at Chestnut Cemetery, Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15][18]
3rd Lieutenant Hugh Black and wife Mary Ann Harvey Black, ca. 1862. Image credit: State Archives of Florida")
  • 3rd Lieutenant Hugh Black was born in Gadsden County, Florida on June 28, 1835 as the son of James Black. He served in the Everglades in the third Seminole War (1855–58) as a Sergeant with Captain Parkhill’s Company of Florida Mounted Volunteers from 29 July 1857 to 29 January 1858. He was then described as being 6’ tall, dark complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a farmer. Hugh married Mary Ann Harvey of Leon County in 1860. They moved to Liberty County and he became the tax assessor there. He is also identified as a farmer, owning real estate in the value of $1,000, and a personal worth of $675. Hugh enlisted for state service on September 4, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry, and appointed 1st Lieutenant. He reenlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 3rd Lieutenant. He was stationed at Rico’s Bluff and was with the company from its departure from Florida until July 8, 1863 when he served as a member of a Regimental Court Martial. He returned to the company at the conclusion of that duty, and was present with it until he was wounded in the right elbow and hand at Chickamauga, Georgia on September 19, 1863. He was hospitalized at Columbus, Georgia shortly thereafter. Despite his wounding and hospitalization, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on November 5, 1863. He received a furlough to Florida on December 25, 1863 for 30 days. He returned to the company sometime after February 1864. He became ill in August, 1864. He retired October 19, 1864, and was assigned to Reserve Forces Florida by S.O. 250 dated October 21, 1864. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 10, 1865. After the war, he lived at Fort Braden and was Clerk of the State Legislature, a Leon County Commissioner, and a Leon County School teacher. Lieutenant Black applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on May 18, 1916 and is interred at Fort Braden Cemetery, Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida.[3][4][5][6][14][15][19]

Non-commissioned Officers[edit]

Antebellum image of Daniel Lafayette Kenan and 1st wife Martha Ann Gregory, ca. 1851. Image credit: The Kenan family and some allied families of the compiler and publisher
(L-R) Major Daniel Lafayette Kenan (ca. 1862-3) and 2nd wife Virginia Douglas Nathans Kenan (ca. 1874). Image credit: The Kenan family and some allied families of the compiler and publisher
  • 1st Sergeant[20] Daniel Lafayette Kenan was born at Kenansville, Duplin County, North Carolina on March 25, 1825. His family moved from there to Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in 1831. His father died in 1840 when he was still a minor. He married Martha Ann Gregory of Quincy, Florida on February 26, 1851 at Quincy. He was a carriage maker; he also became wealthy by an inheritance of 75 acres of land and 30 slaves from his Aunt, Jane Hall, in 1858. He served in the Florida House of the State Legislature from 1850 until 1859. In 1860 he, along with wife Martha and 6 children, was living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a mechanic by profession, owning real estate in the value of $3,000, and a personal worth of $25,000. Kenan was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 1st Sergeant. He was stationed at Rico’s Bluff and was with the company until about April 15, when elections of field and staff officers for the 6th Florida Infantry Regiment were held. 1st Sergeant Kenan was elected to Major of the regiment. With his commission becoming official on April 18; Major Kenan would be replaced by 2nd Sergeant Edward B. White as the company’s 1st Sergeant.

    ca. January, 1863 - Strawberry Plains, Tennessee - "Our Major is a fine man, the rest are not fit to tote guts to a bear…The first and seventh regiment is in the same fix that the sixth regiment is, their field officers are of no account." - 1st Lieutenant James Hays, Company D, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment.[6]

On November 12, 1863 General Braxton Bragg ordered all Florida infantry regiments into a single brigade. Colonel Jesse J. Finley, commanding the 6th Regiment, would be elevated to command the Florida Brigade with the rank of Brigadier General. Lieutenant Colonel Angus D. McLean would be promoted to Colonel and succeeded him in command of the 6th Florida. Major Kenan was elevated to Lieutenant Colonel on November 16, 1863. When Colonel McLean was killed at Dallas, Georgia on May 28, 1864, Lieutenant Colonel Kenan immediately assumed command of the 6th Florida, and would twice command the Florida Brigade temporarily in General Finley’s stead. The second instance occurred at the Battle of Jonesboro, Georgia on August 31, 1864, where he stepped up after General Finley was wounded in the thick of battle, only to be wounded himself with the loss of two fingers of his left hand to a minié ball. He would suffer a serious wound to his right leg at the Battle of Bentonville, North Carolina on March 19, 1865. He was admitted to C.S.A. General Hospital No. 3 at Greensboro, North Carolina in early April, then transferred to C.S.A. General Hospital No. 11 at Charlotte, North Carolina. His right leg was amputated on April 28, 1865; after recovering, he was paroled on May 7, 1865. Martha Ann died on June 1st, 1871; he remarried to Virginia Douglas Nathans at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida on October 10, 1872. Colonel Kenan was impoverished as a result of the war; the majority of his antebellum wealth was in slaves. Although crippled by his wounds, he served as Gadsden County tax assessor until his death at age 58 on February 12, 1884. He was interred with Masonic honors in an unmarked grave at Western Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][6][14][15][21]

  • 3rd Sergeant[22] Henry F. Horne was born in Georgia on December 23, 1835. In 1860 he resided near Jasper, Hamilton County, Florida with his parents and two younger brothers. He was a blacksmith, owning real estate in the value of $120. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 13, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 3rd Sergeant. Sergeant Horne was present with his company until June 12, 1862, when he was transferred to the regimental band just prior to the regiment leaving the state. On July 1, he was reassigned to serve as a quartermaster clerk, in which capacity he served until September 6, 1862. He was left sick at Lexington, Kentucky in October, and barely escaped capture. He returned to and remained with the company until January 11, 1863 when he was detached for service at Knoxville, Tennessee as Clerk to the Examining Board. He continued as a Clerk in service to both the Examining Board at Knoxville and to a Colonel Blake until about August 22, 1863 when he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant and assigned to Company G of the 1st Florida Cavalry.

    "How he (Horne) manages to do nothing when everyone else is hard at work is a mystery to me." - Lieutenant Colonel William T. Stockton, 1st Florida Cavalry[4]

He was wounded near Atlanta, Georgia on August 8, 1864 and again at Jonesboro on September 18, 1864. He retired to the Invalid Corps on December 2, 1864 and was paroled at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 15, 1865. Lieutenant Horne died on December 1, 1883 and is interred at Campbellton Baptist Church Cemetery, Campbellton, Jackson County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]

  • 4th Sergeant John Poole Jordan was born in Virginia in 1837. In 1860 he, along with wife Sarah Frances (née Gunn) and 3 children, was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $1,000, and a personal worth of $8,000. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 4th Sergeant. On April 20, 1862 he was detailed to the regiment’s Headquarters as Commissary Sergeant. He was reported present from that time until October 22, 1863 when he received a furlough of 20 days due to illness. Sometime between November and December 1863, he was documented as serving as the Regimental Quartermaster for the Florida Brigade. He was with what remained of the Florida Brigade when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865 and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. He died on June 24th, 1892 and is interred at Eastern Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • 5th Sergeant Byardam Garden Pringle was born at Charleston, South Carolina 1823. He is listed among the graduates of the College of Charleston, class of 1834.[23] In 1848, he and a W. Y. Paxton purchased the Charleston newspaper “The Evening News”; Pringle was an acknowledged writer and assumed the paper's editorial responsibilities.[24] In 1849, he was appointed as a Magistrate[25][26] of St. Philips and St. Michaels Parishes. In July 1850, Pringle terminated his short editorial career. His record disappears until January 3, 1861 when the sixty-nine members of Florida's secession convention assembled at the state capital at Tallahassee, where a motion was made for John C Pelot from Alachua County was called to the Chair and B. Garden Pringle of Gadsden County was requested to act as Secretary.[27] He again drops from the record until he enlisted in Davidson’s Company on April 14, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed as 5th Sergeant. His description was given as 5’ 7” tall, hazel eyes, black hair, and dark skin. On May 1, 1862 he was detailed as Clerk and private secretary to Colonel Jesse J. Finley, commanding the 6th Florida Regiment. He was present until November 15, 1862 when he was awarded a furlough of 40 days; he did not return until about March 9, 1863. On April 6, 1863 he was detailed as a clerk to the Headquarters of the Department of East Tennessee at which he served until June 13, 1863. On that date, he was granted furlough of 30 days, and from which he never returned.[3][4][5]
  • 2nd Sergeant Edward Booth White was born on November 23, 1834. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and was appointed as 2nd Sergeant. He was promoted to 1st Sergeant on April 18, 1862, relieving Daniel Lafayette Kenan as the company’s 1st Sergeant when he was elected to Major during the regiment’s organization. He was present with the company until October 16, 1862 when he was accidental wounded by the discharge of a gun (artillery) at Big Hill, Kentucky. He was left behind to recover from his wounds, and captured on October 29. He was transferred to Lexington, Kentucky on November 15 and subsequently transferred to Louisville, Kentucky on November 17, where he would be place on the steamboat Mary Crane with other confederate prisoners. The trip would take them to Vicksburg, Mississippi via Cairo, Illinois for exchange. He was at that time described as 27 years old, 5’ 7-1/2” tall, with gray eyes, dark hair, and light complexion. The date of his return to the company is unknown, but he was awarded a furlough of 40 days effective from January 14, 1863. He returned to about March 9 of 1863. He suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $13.30; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. He was reported present with the company from this point until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was listed with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant, and paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. Lieutenant White died on October 17, 1877 and is interred at City Greenwood Cemetery, Weatherford, Parker County, Texas.[3][4][5][14]
  • 3rd Corporal[28]Henry A. Crosby was born in 1839 near Appling, Columbia County, Georgia.[29] He relocated to Gadsden County, Florida sometime after 1850 but before the Federal census of 1860. He was shown living at the dwelling of Todd Hardy, a farmer, and listed as a laborer. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 14, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and was appointed as 3rd Corporal. He was present with the company until his death from disease while a patient in hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on July 12, 1862. He was recorded as being interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • 1st Corporal Robert Emmett Jones was born at Baltimore, Baltimore County, Maryland on November 9, 1842. When he was an infant, his parents removed with him to Florida, where he there remained until he attained the age of seventeen years, attending the best schools of Quincy, and becoming thoroughly prepared for a collegiate course. He then entered Wolford College, South Carolina, and graduated with honor. He returned to Quincy, where he began the study of law in the office of Honorable Charles H. Dupont Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of that State. After three years, he was admitted to practice in the various courts of the State, and was actively and successfully engaged when the American civil war began. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in the home of his mother, Lucretia, along with five younger brothers and a younger sister. He was listed as being a law student. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 14, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and was appointed as 1st Corporal. He tendered his resignation from this position May 1, 1862 and was transferred to Company B of the 1st Florida Special Battalion on June 14 in direct exchange for Private C. Peter Muller of that command.[3][4][5][14][15][30]
  • 4th Corporal John W. Poindexter was born in Florida ca. 1845. In 1860, he was living in the residence of Harriet L. Poindexter (relationship unknown) and an 8 years old orphan named Lilla Goldwire near Mount Pleasant, Gadsden County, Florida. Harriet was quite well off, owning real estate in the value of $5,000 and a personal wealth of some $14,000. Both John and Lilla attended school within the 12 months preceding the census. John enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 15, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and was appointed as 4th Corporal. He was present with the company from his enlistment until June 4, 1863; he was promoted to 4th Sergeant on July 14, 1862. He was discharged from service almost a year later on June 4, 1863 by substitution of James Sweeney.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • 2nd Corporal John C. Saunders was born ca. 1830 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his wife Mary and 4 children. He was by occupation a laborer, with a personal worth of $400. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 15, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and was appointed as 2nd Corporal. He was detailed to service as a nurse to remain in Florida with the company’s sick when the company left the state. He was promoted to 3rd Sergeant on May 1, 1862, and rejoined the company between June 30 and November 12, 1862. He was present on all rolls until between July 9 and October 31, 1863 when he was reported sick in a hospital at Newnan, Georgia. He was given a furlough of 35 days on November 12, 1863, presumably to return to Florida to convalesce. He died of disease in Florida on January 24, 1864.[3][4][5][14][15]

Enlisted Men[edit]

  • Musician Alexander Elick McPherson was born at Barbour County, Alabama on March 19, 1847. Sometime prior to 1860, his family moved to Marianna in Jackson County, Florida. In the census of that year, he is shown living at his father Archibald’s residence along with his step-mother Debora Ann (nee Edinfield), an older sister and brother and two younger brothers and two younger sisters. Alexander, older brother James, and father Archibald all enlisted on March 20, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida; Alexander was 15 years old and James was 16 years old. Both were assigned as musicians.[31][32] Archibald, being some 51 years old, was taken into service as a Private. Alexander was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until October 10, 1863 when he was ordered to the hospital by a Surgeon for unspecified reason. He is documented present at the S. P. Moore Hospital at Griffin, Georgia during the period September 30 to December 1, 1863.[33][34] Alexander returned to the company on December 1, 1863 and was reported present from this point until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was listed with the rank of Private, and paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. He was twice married; first to Annie Ellen (née Gainer), and subsequently in 1872 to Sarah Elizabeth (née Gregory) with whom he fathered 7 children. Private McPherson applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on June 16, 1930 at Gretna, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Musician James “Jim” McPherson, older brother of Alexander McPherson, was born at Barbour County, Alabama on December 6, 1839. Sometime prior to 1860, his family moved to Marianna in Jackson County, Florida. In the census of that year, he is shown living at his father Archibald’s residence along with his step-mother Debora Ann (nee Edinfield), an older sister, three younger brothers and two younger sisters. James, younger brother Alexander, and father Archibald all enlisted on March 20, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida; James was 16 years old and Alexander was 15 years old. Both were assigned as musicians. In November and December 1863, “Jim” pulled guard duty[35][36] at the city jail at Knoxville, Tennessee on November 17–18; in the same period, he was also detailed as a company cook.[37][38] He suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $13.30; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. Jim was present on all rolls until November 15, 1864; he is documented as an in-patient at the Madison House Hospital at Montgomery, Alabama on November 5, 1864 for unknown ailment. He was reported present with the company from this point until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was listed with the rank of Private, and paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. James married Ellen Browning sometime after 1862. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. Private “Jim” McPherson died on June 16, 1930 at Greensboro, Gadsden County, Florida and is interred at the Sunny Dell Cemetery, Gretna, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private J. S. Barker died in Kentucky, and was buried in Lexington Cemetery.[3]
  • Private Thomas F. Barr was born on June 19, 1844 at Jefferson County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Jasper, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father John’s residence along with his mother Mary, an older sister, and an infant brother; his occupation was laborer. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 5, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was transferred on June 12, 1862 to Captain Gregory’s Company (Company H, 5th Florida Infantry) in direct exchange for Private J. W. Tolen (John R. Tolar) of that command.[4][5][14][15]
Private Neil Graeme Black, younger brother of 1st Lieutenant Hugh Black. Image credit: Ancestry.com"
  • Private Neil Graeme Black, the younger brother of 1st Lieutenant Hugh Black, was born on May 31, 1840 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Neil’s residence along with his mother Sarah, an older brother, two younger sisters and brother. Neil had attended school during the preceding 12 months, along with his younger sisters and brother. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12h, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company from his enlistment until October 28, 1862 when he was reported sick in the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was given a furlough of sixty days beginning in November; he was recorded as being absent without leave between the expiration of his furlough and February 9, 1863, when he returned to the company. He was present with the company from that date until November 29, 1863 when he was admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospitals at Macon, Georgia with chronic diarrhea. He returned to the company before January 1, 1864 and was present with what remained of the Florida Brigade when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. He married Ann Lott on November 12, 1867. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. Private Black died on April 30, 1911 and is interred at Black Moseley Cemetery, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
Private James C. Boykin, Company A, 6th Florida Infantry. (Post-bellum tintype, ca. 1883). Image credit: Sam Boykin"
  • Private James Cornelius Boykin was March 9, 1843 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father John’s residence along with two older brothers and sisters, and two younger sisters. James had attended school during the preceding 12 months, along an older brother and sister, and his two younger sisters. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12h, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company from his enlistment until June 20, 1862 when he was reported sick at Atlanta, Georgia. He was reported absent without leave in Florida in muster reports beginning on November 12, 1862 and continuing through March 2, 1863. He apparently returned to the company prior to April 11, 1863; he was assigned to police duty at Knoxville, Tennessee on that date. He was wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga on September 19, 1863, and sent to a hospital at Atlanta Georgia where he remained until October 10, at which time he received a furlough of 30 days. He married Jane Carolina McKeown in 1863; it is not unlikely that the marriage occurred between his return to Quincy and December 31, 1863. He is last recorded as still absent at Quincy, Florida as of February 1864; he surrendered at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida on was paroled May 21, 1865. After the war, he engaged in farming then became a merchant at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. He moved to Washington County, Florida in 1876, where he continued his trades and served as Sheriff. Afterward, he moved to Jackson County, Florida, where he worked as a clerk until he passed away on November 26, 1885 at Sneads, Jackson County, Florida. He was a Mason, and is interred at Pope Cemetery, Sneads, Jackson County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Josephus Bracewell was born January 27, 1830 at Houston County, Georgia. Moved to Florida in winter of 1854, and married Amanda Walden on January 28, 1856 at Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 9, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was recorded as absent sick at Calhoun County, Florida until June 30, 1862; he returned to the company about June 30 and was present with it until July 7, 1863 when he was detached for service as a teamster to Major J. Glover, Chief Quartermaster of the Department of East Tennessee. Private Bracewell was severely wounded on July 22, 1864 during the Battle of Atlanta, sustaining gunshot wounds to his right shoulder, left arm, and jaw. He returned to Florida to convalesce and was still in Florida at the war’s end; he was paroled at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 16, 1865. He was at that time described as 5’ 8” tall, light hair and skin, and blue eyes. After the war, he lived at Bristol in Liberty County, Florida. Private Bracewell applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on January 26, 1916 at Bristol, Liberty County, Florida and is interred at Meacham Cemetery, Bristol, Liberty County, Florida.[3][4][14]
  • Private James M. Bryant was born at Gadsden County, Florida ca. 1831. In 1860 he was living in the Tologee District of Gadsden County, Florida with his wife Elizabeth, whom he married within the 12 months preceding the census, and three sons. He was by occupation a carpenter, with a personal worth of $100. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on June 22, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida as a substitute for James H. Gee, also of Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company from his enlistment through December 20, 1863, and was promoted to 2nd Corporal between April 30 and July 9, 1863. He was sent to the Atlanta Medical College Hospital at Atlanta, Georgia on December 20, 1863 and died of unspecified illness the following day. He is interred at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Jesse R. Butler was born ca. 1838. He enlisted for state service on September 14, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry. He reenlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was absent sick at Liberty County, Florida prior to June 30, 1862, but was present with the company after that date until his death from disease on September 30, 1862 in a hospital at Lexington, Kentucky. He is interred at Lexington National Cemetery, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private John Butler was born on July 6, 1837 at Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 9, 1862 at Liberty County, Florida. He was absent sick at Atlanta, Georgia prior to June 30, 1862, but was present with the company from July 30 until December 22, 1862 when he was detached for service as a teamster at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company prior to February 9, 1863. He suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $55.85; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. He was reported present with the company from this point until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. He married Martha Mobley on February 21, 1867 at Wakulla County, Florida. John was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on April 20, 1910 and is interred at Mount Tabor Cemetery, Lakeland, Polk County, Florida.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private John Calvin Campbell was born ca. 1833. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Alex’s residence along with his mother, seven younger brothers and one younger sister. His occupation was as a laborer. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 15, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was appointed 1st Corporal on August 1, 1862. John was with the company from his enlistment until October 16, 1862, when he was mortally wounded by the accidental discharge of a gun at Big Hill, Kentucky. He was left behind at Richmond, Kentucky and died from his wounds on January 1, 1863.[3][4][5][14]
Battle of Chickamauga Roll of Honor, Florida. Image credit: "Official Records"
  • Private David Cannon was born ca. 1831 in North Carolina. In 1860 he was living near Blue Creek, Liberty County, Florida with wife Mary and four children. He owned real estate valued at $400, and a personal worth of $196. David enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 4, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was listed at sick at Liberty County prior to June 30 of 1862, but rejoined the company after that date and was with it until October 28, 1862 when he again took ill and was admitted to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company prior to November 12, and was with it until he was mortally wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia about the 19th of September. He was hospitalized at La Grange, Georgia where he died on September 22, 1863. Private Cannon is identified on the Chickamauga Roll of Honor[39] for “conspicuous gallantry and good conduct in battle."[1][3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Jacob C. Cannon was born ca. 1837 in North Carolina. In 1860 he was living near Blue Creek, Liberty County, Florida, at his father Ira’s residence along with his mother, four younger brothers and four younger sisters. He married Mary A. Boykin on January 23, 1862 at Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 8, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. His younger brother, Thomas, enlisted in the same company in March. John was listed at sick at Liberty County prior to June 30 of 1862, but rejoined the company after that date and was with it until October 24, 1862 when he again took ill and was admitted to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to duty prior to November 12, 1862 and was with the company until August 30, 1863 when he was again admitted to a hospital for illness, this time at London, Tennessee. He appears to have returned to the company prior to November 25, 1863, because he suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $55.85; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. He suffered a gunshot wound to the left groin at Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia on June 15, 1864. The wound was of such severity that he would not return to service; he surrendered at Quincy, Gadsden County Florida on May 11, 1865 and was paroled from there eleven days later. Jacob was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on March 29, 1893 and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Thomas H. Cannon was born ca. 1848 in North Carolina. In 1860 he was living near Blue Creek, Liberty County, Florida, at his father Ira’s residence along with his mother; he was the sixth of nine children. He enlisted for state service on September 7, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry with the rank of private, and reenlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden, Florida. His oldest brother, Jacob, would enlist in the same company in May. Thomas stated his age as 18 at the time of enlistment; the U.S. Census of 1860 put his age at enlistment at 14 years. He was present with the company from enlistment until July 12, 1862 when he was detailed as a wagon guard. We would be detached for service as a wagoneer at Knoxville, Tennessee on December 22, 1862. He returned to the company by February 9, 1863 and was present with it until September 19, 1863 when he was mortally wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia. He died in a field hospital on September 22, 1863.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Carroll was born ca. 1841. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden, Florida. He was rejected for service by an inspecting officer on April 19, 1862.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private John J. Cowan was born at Pike County, Georgia on March 19, 1821. He came to Florida in October, 1842. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was present with the company from his enlistment until October 28, 1862 when he was reported sick in the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company prior November 12, 1862. He was reported to been on guard duty at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 16–17, and again on August 22nd-23rd, 1863. He was wounded in the left leg at the Battle of Chickamauga, Georgia on September 22, 1863. On October 15, 1863 he was granted a furlough of 60 days at Forsythe, Georgia. He was absent sick in a hospital at Tallahassee, Florida from December 19, 1863 until sometime after February 23, 1864. He did rejoin the company; he was with what remained of the Florida Brigade when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865 and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. He married Sarah Colvin on October 9, 1878 at Gadsden County, Florida. Private Cowan applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on February 22, 1912 at Manatee County, Florida. He was interred at the expense of Manatee County; his interment location is unknown.[3][4][5][14]
USS Maria Denning was an 870-ton side-wheel river steamer, built at Cincinnati in 1858 for commercial employment. She was purchased by the Navy in 1861 to be used as a transport on the Western Rivers. In addition to that duty, she also served as receiving ship at Cairo, Illinois, from November 1861 to April 1862. Maria Denning was transferred to the Army in December 1862 and was used as a U.S. Army Transport from then until April 1863. Image credit U.S. Naval Historical Center
Camp Chase (Columbus, Ohio). Camp Chase was established on farmland outside of Columbus, Ohio in June of 1861. It began as a training facility preparing Ohio volunteers for the battlefronts of the Civil War. Shortly after it opened, the camp received its first prisoner of war. Five months later, the camp held nearly 300 prisoners, most of them civilian political prisoners from Kentucky and Virginia. After the exchange program deteriorated in the summer of 1863, the prison population at Camp Chase grew to more than 2,000. By 1864, the prison population expanded to 8,000, well more than the facility was designed to handle. As the prison population exploded, living conditions rapidly deteriorated. Diseases, such as smallpox, typhus, and pneumonia, ran rampant in the camp's unsanitary, crowded barracks. Prisoners also suffered from malnutrition and exposure during the harsh winters. By the end of the war and the camp's closure in July 1865, more than 26,000 Confederate prisoners passed through Camp Chase's gates. Of these soldiers, nearly eight percent died while incarcerated.[40](Image credit: Library of Congress)
  • Private George W. Crawford was born ca. 1844.[41] He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on April 18, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida as a substitute for a William King, who had enlisted on March 12. He was present with the company from his enlistment date until October 10, 1862 when he was left sick at Harrodsburg, Kentucky. He was reported as absent without leave in Florida from that time until his return to the company about March 12, 1863. (He was in fact captured at Harrodsburg after Confederate forces withdrew, he is documented as awaiting exchange onboard the steamer “Maria Denning” near Vicksburg, Mississippi on November 15, 1862.) He was present with the company from March 12 through July 9, 1862; sometime between July 9 and October 31, he was reported sick at Atlanta, Georgia and reported absent without leave. He was with the company at the Battle of Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863 and reported as missing in action. He was admitted to [Federal] General Field Hospital at Bridgeport, Alabama on December 10, 1863 due to a gunshot wound in his right arm. He was transferred to [Federal] General Hospital No. 3 at Nashville, Tennessee on December 11, arriving there on the evening of December 12, and sent to the rest home on December 20. He remained there until March 20, 1864 when he was released from the hospital and transferred to the [Federal] Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky. He was transferred from there to Camp Chase, Ohio on March 24, 1864 arriving there two days later. He was paroled from Camp Chase on February 25, 1865 and transferred to City Point, Virginia for exchange. He arrived at 3rd Division General Hospital Camp Winder, Richmond, Virginia On March 3, 1865. He was transferred to Jackson Hospital, Richmond, Virginia on March 7, 1865 and received a furlough of 30 days.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private James T. Crawford was born ca. 1827 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living in the Tologee District of Gadsden County, Florida with his wife Sarah and one daughter. He was by occupation a laborer, with a personal worth of $100. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was reported absent sick at his home, and died there on July 9, 1862.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Isham J. Crosby was born ca. 1840 in South Carolina. In 1860 he was living near Starke in Alachua County, Florida at the residence of Jackson Reddish and family, who was a farmer of some means. Isham’s occupation was shown as a laborer. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 25, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was present with the company until being detailed in November, 1862 as an orderly to Colonel Jesse J. Finley, commanding the 6th Florida Infantry Regiment. He was sent for unknown cause, under Surgeon’s orders, to the hospital on October 29, 1863. He returned prior to January 1, 1864. He died of unspecified cause on October 11, 1864, and is interred at Rose Hill Confederate Cemetery, Macon, Bibb County, Georgia.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Barnett Davis was born on January 18, 1834 in Alabama. He married Mary Gornto on April 4, 1861. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company until October 25, 1862 when he was sick in a hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. After returning to the company, his was detailed as a wagoneer at Knoxville from December 22, 1862 until February 9, 1863. He was with the company from that point until it was surrendered with what remained of the Florida Brigade at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. Mary died on July 4th, 1865. He remarried on January 10, 1866 to Cornelia Fletcher. There is no record of Cornelia’s death or divorce; William remarried for the final time to Margaret McDonald. In 1884, William moved to Taylor County, having purchased 340 acres 8 miles southeast of Perry. Two years later, he was operating a small mercantile business in Perry. He died on March 3, 1901 and is interred at Woodlawn Cemetery, Perry, Taylor County, Florida.[3][4][5][14]
Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana was established on a 36-acre tract of. It was among the largest of the Union's eight prison camps established for Confederate noncommissioned officers and privates. Between 1862 and 1865, the camp's average prison population was 3,214; it averaged fifty deaths per month. Its maximum prison population reached 4,999 in July 1864. More than 1,700 prisoners died at the camp during its four years of operation. (Image credit: Library of Congress)
Established on August 1, 1863, Point Lookout was the largest and one of the worst Union prisoner-of-war camps. It was located at the extreme tip of St. Mary's County, on the long, low, and barren peninsula where the Potomac River joins the Chesapeake Bay. The prison's official name was Camp Hoffman but it was hardly ever used. Before long, the prison became the most populated and largest Union prison, at one time holding 20,000 prisoners, because it was so close to the battlefields on the Eastern Theater. Besides chronic diarrhea, dysentery and typhoid fever had become epidemic at the camp while smallpox, scurvy, and the itch had become quite common. Because of the topography, drainage was poor, and the area was subject to extreme heat in the summer and cold in the winter. This exacerbated the problems created by inadequate food, clothing, fuel, housing, and medical care. As a result, approximately 3,000 prisoners died there over 22 months.[42](Image credit: Library of Congress)
  • Private Simeon S. Dugger, Sr. was born on September 29, 1829 at Thomas County, Georgia. He married Mary A. Pitman on October 2, 1857 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living in Leon County, Florida with Mary and two daughters. He was by occupation a farmer, with a personal worth of $95. He enlisted April 1, 1864 at Whitfield County, Georgia in Captain Davidson’s Company; however, there is no official record of his service until he was captured near Marietta, Georgia on July 3, 1864 immediately following the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.[43] He was sent to the Federal Military Prison at Nashville, Tennessee, and immediately sent from there to Louisville Kentucky. On July 13, 1864, he was transferred to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, Indiana arriving there on July 14. While imprisoned at Camp Morton, Private Duggan contracted a severe respiratory infection, resulting in the loss of sight in his right eye. He was paroled on March 15, 1865 and sent via the Baltimore and Ohio railroad to Point Lookout, Maryland to await exchange. Simeon was admitted General Hospital No. 9 at Richmond, Virginia, on March 24, 1865. He surrendered at Tallahassee on May 10, 1865, and was paroled on May 18, 1865. After the war, Private Dugger and his family moved to Liberty County, Florida near Hosford. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on September 18, 1904 at Hosford, and is interred at Blue Creek Cemetery, Liberty County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Elias Joshua Edenfield was born ca. 1842 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living at the residence of James Rowan and family in the Tologee District of Gadsden County, Florida. His profession is given as laborer. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted into Confederate service on April 17, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company by Captain Davidson for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from his enlistment until February 10, 1864 when he was hospitalized under Surgeon’s order at Walker Hospital at Columbus, Georgia. He remained there until rejoining his company on March 30. He was wounded by a shell fragment in left leg at Atlanta on July 22, 1864, and hospitalized on July 27 at the Marshall Hospital at Columbus, Georgia; then transferred to the 1st Mississippi C.S.A. Hospital at Jackson, Mississippi, where he was admitted for “haemorrhagia” (heavy bleeding) on August 20. He returned to the company on September 18, 1864. He surrendered at Tallahassee on May 10, 1865, and was paroled there on May 18, 1865. He returned to Grady County, Georgia and married Anna Kirkland[44] on November 4, 1866. He is recorded to have lived in Mitchell County, Georgia in 1870, but returned to Grady County prior to 1906. He applied for and was awarded a Georgia Confederate Pension. He died after 1907; the actual date of death and place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Darley Eubanks was born ca. 1833 in Georgia. He married Nancy Todd on July 28, 1856 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living near Bristol Creek, Liberty County, Florida with Nancy and an infant daughter. He had a personal worth of $100. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 17, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was listed as sick at Gadsden County from the date of his enlistment, and was there when the company left the state in June. He returned to the company November 12, 1862, and was present with it until late November/early December, 1863. He died of unspecified disease while in a hospital at Griffin, Georgia on December 6, 1863. He is interred at Stonewall Cemetery, Griffin, Spalding County, Georgia.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William A. Fair was born ca. 1841 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Milledgeville, Baldwin County, Georgia, at his father Peter’s residence along with his mother; he was the fourth of seven children, all boys. His profession was harness maker, and he had a personal worth of $25. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. On August 8, 1863 he was transferred to Company A, 3rd Regiment Engineer Troops (CSA), and served as an “Artificer”,[45] attached to General Simon Bolivar Buckner’s Corps.[3][4][5][14][15][46]
Camp Douglas (Chicago, Illinois). Considered the "Andersonville of the North", Camp Douglas was one of the longest continuous operating prison camps of the Civil War. Located south of Chicago, the prison was built on land provided to the state by the estate of Stephen Douglas. Camp Douglas held a total of 30,000 Confederate prisoners during the Civil War. Like many other prison camps, overcrowding, poor sanitary conditions and inadequate shelter lead to sickness and death. Death also came as a result of withholding rations, torture by prison guards and neglect of soldiers who were ill. Inept record keeping makes it nearly impossible to calculate the number of dead soldiers buried in mass graves at Camp Douglas. (Image credit: Harper's Weekly, April 5, 1862)
  • Private William J. Ferrell was born October 7, 1833 at Washington County, Georgia. He married Margaret S. Floyd on January 15, 1857. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with Margaret and 2 sons. He was by occupation an overseer. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on April 28, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. William was promoted to 4th Corporal on June 5, 1863. He was captured near Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864 and sent to the military prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois. He was released on June 19, 1865. Private Ferrell applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on April 27, 1917 and is interred at Hosford Cemetery, Hosford, Liberty County, Florida.[3][4][14][15]
  • Private John J. Fillingin
  • Private Joseph C. Fletcher was born in Georgia ca. 1844. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Joseph’s residence along with his mother and eight other children. He was the second of seven Fletcher children; Frances and James Tomberlin, both 11 years of age, also resided at the Fletcher residence. Young Joseph listed his profession as farm laboring; he had attended school with 12 months of the census. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted into Confederate service with Davidson’s Company on March 13, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was recorded as absent sick at Calhoun County, Florida until June 30, 1862; he returned to the company about June 30 and was present with it until December 22, 1862. After completion of his detached service, he returned to the company and was present with it until he was again detached for duty, this time to the City Police at Knoxville, Tennessee on April 25, 1863. He was documented on a clothing issue receipt dated September 10, 1864; whether he survived the war, his date of death and place of interment are unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Henry A. Flowers was born ca. 1842 in Florida. In 1860, he was living in Madison County, Florida, at his father Joseph’s residence. He was the sixth of eight children, and gave his profession as a day laborer. He enlisted for state service on September 4, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry with the rank of private. He reenlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was recorded as absent sick at Calhoun County, Florida until June 30, 1862; he returned to the company about June 30 and was present with it until December 20, 1862 when he was detached for service as a pork house guard at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was hospitalized while at Knoxville, and succumbed to disease on March 18, 1863. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private L. Fowler was born ca. 1836 in Alabama. In 1860, he was living near Apalachicola, Franklin County, Florida with his older brother, two younger brothers and a younger sister. He appears on an undated List of Prisoners transferred from Louisville, Kentucky to Vicksburg, Mississippi for exchange, being captured on November 1, 1862.[5][14][15]
  • Private Richard Freeman was born ca. 1837. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company until September 3, 1862 when he was detached for service as a wagoneer. After this assignment, he returned to the company and was present with it until April 11, 1863 when he was assigned to service with the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was again detailed as a wagoneer on June 25, this time in service to the 6th Florida Regiment. He was reported absent sick between June 25 an October 31, 1863, but returned to the company to be assigned extra duty near Chickamauga, Georgia from November 1 through 28th 30th, 1863. He obtained a furlough of 30 days beginning on November 28, but was reported absent without leave before the end of December. He did return to the company in January, but was ordered hospitalized by Surgeon’s Certificate on February 21, 1864. He was again hospitalized on May 23, 1864 at the Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, Georgia, being afflicted with fistula-in-ano.[47] Private Freeman was transferred to a hospital at Columbus, Georgia on May 28, 1864; he apparently succumbed to his affliction, and was reported interred in a local cemetery.[3][4][5]
  • Private Richard C. Gatlin was born January 9, 1845 at Geneva County, Alabama. His family relocated to Gadsden County, Florida ca. 1848. In 1860, Richard was living at the residence of his father, Richard, along with his mother and 10 brothers and sisters. His profession was given as a laborer. He, along with older brothers Thomas and William, enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Richard was with the company from the time of his enlistment until August 12, 1862 when he was discharged from service for physical disability. He reenlisted in Company L, 1st Florida (Reserves) Regiment at Quincy on April 15, 1864. He was serving as a cooper at Tallahassee, Florida at the close of the war; he surrendered there on May 10, 1865 and took the Oath of Allegiance on May 12. He was described at the time as 5'6" tall, with black hair & eyes, and fair skin. He married Sarah Haygood at Gadsden County on January 20, 1869. Private Gatlin applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on May 24, 1915 and is interred at Antioch Baptist Church Cemetery at Wetumpka, Gadsden County, Florida.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Thomas Gatlin was born ca. 1844 in Alabama. His family relocated to Gadsden County, Florida ca. 1848. In 1860, William was living at the residence of his father, Richard, along with his mother and 10 brothers and sisters. His profession was given as a laborer. He, along with younger brothers Richard and William, enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Thomas was present with the company until September 3, 1862 when he was detached for service as a wagoneer. He returned to the company prior to November 12, and was again detached for service on December 20, this time as a pork house guard Knoxville, Tennessee. He continued in this service until about March 12, 1863; he returned to the company and was again detailed for detached service, this time to the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee on April 11. He returned to the company about April 30, was present with it from that time until September 19, 1863 when he was killed in action at the Battle of Chickamauga. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Gatlin was born ca. 1844 in Alabama. His family relocated to Gadsden County, Florida ca. 1848. In 1860, William was living at the residence of his father, Richard, along with his mother and 10 brothers and sisters. His profession was given as a laborer. He, along with older brother Thomas and younger brother Richard, enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Shortly after his enlistment he was detailed to make barrels, he became attached to “Captain Archibald C. Smith’s Cavalry of Colonel George W. Scott’s Battalion (or regiment) of Florida Troops” [5th Battalion, Florida Cavalry]. He enlisted with this organization on July 27, 1863, and continued with that organization until the end of the war. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and took the Oath of Allegiance on May 12. He was described as 5” tall, with light hair, black eyes, and light complexion. Married Lilla Bassett at Gadsden County, Florida on May 25, 1898. Private Gatlin applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on October 23, 1913 at Gretna, Gadsden County, Florida. His place of interment is unknown.[3][5][14][15]
  • Private George W. Giddings was born ca. 1817 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida, along with Sarah and a daughter. He was by occupation a wood chopper. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when his company left the state. He rejoined the company shortly after June 30, 1862, but was again absent sick at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 28, 1862. He was granted a furlough of 5 days, beginning on November 20; he was reported as absent without leave in Florida from November 25, 1862 through March 21, 1863. He was listed as sick in a hospital at Columbus Georgia from March 21, 1863 through July 9, 1863; he apparently returned to the company prior to August 22, as he was detailed on guard duty at the jail iat Knoxville, Tennessee from August 22 until August 23, 1863. He was ordered into the hospital under Surgeon’s order on October 26, 1863. He is believed to have returned to the company, but was again ordered by the Surgeon into the hospital near Dalton, Georgia on February 4, 1864. He was diagnosed with scrofula[48] and general debility,[49] and discharged from service at Dalton, Georgia on March 4, 1864. He married Emiline Miley at Thonotosassa, Hillsborough County, Florida on April 3, 1870. He died while away from his home on January 28, 1876 at Pasco County, Florida. His place of interment is unknown. Emeline applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for George’s service.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Robert L. Goldwire was born in September 1843 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He, along with two brothers and two sisters, was orphaned in 1853; they were taken in by their maternal grandmother, Sarah A. Lines. Madame Lines was a woman of some means; in 1860, she and the children were living near Quincy, Gadsden County Florida. Madame Lines reported a real estate worth of $40,000 and a personal worth of $80,000. All of the children in her care were enrolled in school within 12 months of the 1860 census. Robert enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when his company left the state. He managed to rejoin the company on or about June 30, 1862 and was present with them until November 13 when he was transferred to the regimental band at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. He returned from that assignment on May 13, 1863, and was assigned to guard duty with the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee from August 17–18, 1863. He was sent to a hospital at LaFayette, Georgia on September 13, 1863 for unknown reason. After his release from the hospital, he served on the Provost Guard[50] at La Grange, Georgia until January 1, 1864. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and took the Oath of Allegiance on May 15. His description is given as 5’ 9” height, dark hair, blue eyes, and dark complexion. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private H. A. Gore was born ca. 1842 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, Ellis, along with his mother and 6 brothers. He had attended school within 12 months of the census; his occupation was given as a laborer. “H.A.”, along with younger brother Jasper, enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 2, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when his company left the state. He returned to the company prior to November 12, 1862. He was sent to a hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on January 5, 1863, and was absent from the company from that date until about March 12, 1863. He was present with the company until July 1, when he was captured near Cowan, Tennessee during Bragg’s withdrawal from Tullahoma.[51] He was sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky on July 15; he was reported as an inpatient at the Nashville Prison Hospital on August 8. He was reported to have died as a result of an accident at the hospital on October 1, 1863, and was interred in a local cemetery.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Jasper Gore was born ca. 1846 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, Ellis, along with his mother and 6 brothers. He had attended school within 12 months of the census; his occupation was given as a laborer. Jasper, along with older brother “H.A.”, enlisted in Davidson’s Company on May 2, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until January 27, 1863, when he died while in the Asylum Hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He is interred at Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private John Allison Grubb was born on April 1, 1843 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, Nicholas, along with his mother, 2 brothers and 2 sisters. Enlisted September 21, 1861 at Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida in Captain Gee’s Company (Company G, 1st Florida Infantry) for a period of 12 months. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 24, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was with the company from the date of enlistment until October 28, 1862 when he was reported sick at Knoxville, Tennessee. He remained at Knoxville, and was assigned as a hospital attendant on January 15, 1863; a week later, he was assigned as a ward master.[52] Between November and December, 1863 he was transferred from the Army of Tennessee by Secretary of War Special Order 264/25 dated November 6, 1863for service as a Clerk in the Department of Medicine, and assigned to the General Hospital at Quincy, Florida. He was paroled at Quincy on June 15, 1865. After the war, John moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he joined the Typographical Union, Local 3 ca. 1870. He relocated to Evansville, Indiana ca. 1874. He was employed by the Savannah Press for some 28 years. Private Gatlin applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He was a confirmed bachelor. He died ca. 1915; his places of death and interment are unknown.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Thomas L. Grubb was born on December 29, 1830, at Quincey, Gadsden County, Florida. Married Julia Floria Tonis within 12 months of the 1860 census. In 1860 he and Julia were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was by trade a carpenter. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was with the company when it departed the state, and was promoted to 5th Sergeant on August 1, 1862, most likely as a replacement for Byardim Garden Pringle, who had been detailed as Clerk and private secretary to Colonel Jesse J. Finley on May 1, 1862. He was detached from the company on December 20, 1862 for temporary service as a pork house guard at Knoxville, Tennessee until about April 27, 1863. On that date, he was granted a furlough of 30 days, which he took in Florida. His furlough was extended to July 23, 1863; he was reassigned from 5th Sergeant to 4th Sergeant on June 5. He did not return to duty until after February 1864; he had been reported as being sick at Quincy, Florida since the extension of his furlough. He was admitted to the Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, Georgia on August 13, 1864 as a result of a gunshot wound that fractured the ring-finger knuckle of his right hand (likely during the Battle of Utoy Creek). He was released on August 17, with a medical furlough of 30 days at Gadsden County, Florida. He returned to the company and was present with it until he was captured at Egypt Station, Mississippi on December 28, 1864. He was transferred to the Military Prison, Alton, Illinois on January 17, 1865 and remained there until he was transferred to Point Lookout, Maryland for exchange on February 21, 1865. He is last documented as being a patient of General Hospital at Howard’s Grove, Richmond, Virginia where he died of continued fever on March 23, 1865. Private Grubb is interred at Oakwood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Colin Campbell Gunn (older brother of William Campbell Gunn of the same company) was born June 28, 1842 at Walton County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, Daniel, along with his mother, 2 brothers and 3 sisters, and was employed as a clerk. He enlisted April 5, 1861 at Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida in Captain Gee’s Company (Company G, 1st Florida Infantry) for a period of 12 months. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 2, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was listed as absent sick at Gadsden County for the period from his enlistment until June 30; he was promoted to 2nd Sergeant on May 3, likely as the replacement for 2nd Sergeant Edward White who was promoted to 1st Sergeant on April 18. Colin was elected to 2nd Lieutenant on November 16, 1863, replacing Lieutenant Hugh Black who had been promoted to 1st Lieutenant on November 5, 1863. Lieutenant Campbell was present with the company until July 21, 1864 when he became ill near Atlanta, Georgia. He returned to duty sometime after September 18, 1864. He was wounded severely in the left thigh on March 19, 1865 at Bentonville, North Carolina and was admitted to C.S.A. General Hospital at Charlotte, North Carolina on April 6, 1865. He was transferred to a hospital at Columbus, Georgia on April 14, and remained there until his parole and discharge on May 12, 1865. He returned to Florida and settled near Marianna, Jackson County, Florida on February 6, 1869. He married Annie E. Rawls at Marianna on June 3, 1891. Lieutenant Gunn applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on May 25, 1916 at Marianna; his remains were transported and interred near his family at Euchee Valley Cemetery, Eucheeanna, Walton County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Campbell Gunn (younger brother of Colin Campbell Gunn of the same company) was born on June 30, 1844 at Walton County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, Daniel, along with his mother, 2 brothers and 3 sisters, and was employed as a clerk. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 17, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was absent sick for a period after his enlistment, but was present with the company when it departed the state. He was detailed for detached service on August 5, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee where he served as a clerk in the Medical Director’s office. He returned from that assignment prior to November 12, 1862 and was present with the company until April 12, 1863 when he was again detailed for detached service, this time as a clerk at Post Headquarters at Knoxville. He returned to the company on or about April 30, and was present with the company before again being detached for service by order of Major General Simon Bolivar Buckner on July 16, 1863. This assignment was to serve as a clerk to a Captain Somerville, A.C.S.[53] William would serve in this capacity until December 1863. He was reported present with the company from that time until July 22, 1864 when he was captured near Atlanta. He was sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky and transferred from there on August 2 to Camp Chase, Ohio. He applied to take the oath of allegiance in November 1864, and was transferred to City Point, Virginia in March 1865. He married Martha Beneta Callaway on December 22, 1869 at Cuthbert, Georgia. William died on September 24, 1893, and is interred at Rosedale Cemetery, Cuthburt, Randolph County, Georgia.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John James Hair was born ca. 1825 in Georgia. He resided in Baker County, Georgia until after 1845, the relocated to Gadsden County, Florida. In 1855, the part of Gadsden County in which he resided was separated from Gadsden County to become Liberty County. John married Eliza E. Butler of Gadsden County at Quincey on September 21, 1850. In 1860 he and Eliza were living near Bristol, Liberty County, Florida. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was rejected by an Inspecting Officer when the company was mustered into Confederate service on April 18, 1862.[36][54] Private Hair died ca. 1919, and is interred at Dead River Cemetery, Bruce, Walton County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private James T. Harden was born ca. 1832 in Georgia. He married Elouisa Adaline Holstein at Midway, Gadsden County, Florida on January 7, 1858. In 1860 he and Elouisa were living near Midway, Gadsden County, Florida. He was by occupation a farmer, owned real estate valued at $500, and reported a personal worth of $200. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when his company left the state. He was reported as absent without leave since June 11. According to Elouisa’s Florida Confederate pension application, James was on his way home on a sick furlough, and died at the home of his aunt, Mary Johnson, at Houston County, Georgia on November 25, 1862. Elouisa was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for James’ service. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Herrington was born ca. 1824 at Alexander, North Carolina. He married Rebecca Sikes prior to 1860 at Apalachicola, Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted in Davidson’s Company on March 3, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick in Florida when the company left the state, and caught up with it after June 30, 1862. He was left sick in a hospital at Lexington, Kentucky on October 11, 1862. There is no further record of military service; however, Private William J. Ferrall attested in 1899 that he was with Private Herrington when he was mortally wounded in action at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. Rebecca applied for and, based on Ferrall’s statement, was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for her husband’s service. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private Benjamin F. Holloway was mustered out of service on April 26, 1865.[3]
  • Private John Tong Howard was born on June 23, 1846 at Vermilionville (now Lafayette), Louisiana. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, John G. Howard, along with his mother and an older sister. His father was a man of means, being a doctor and owning real estate valued at $2,200. His personal wealth was recorded as $4,800. Young John enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 15, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was listed as absent sick when the company was mustered into Confederate service on April 18, but was with the company when it left the state and present with it until December 19, 1862 when he was detailed for service with the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company on April 30, 1863. He was detail to Police Guard on August 16, 1863 and returned to the company the following day. He was present with the company until February 12, 1864 when he was granted a furlough of indulgence of 20 days. He was an in-patient at the Floyd and Ocmulgee Hospitals at Macon on November 9, 1864 having suffered a gunshot wound to his hand, and being struck by a shell fragment “fracturing cs frontis upwards and outwards over left eye; wounds not healed speculae of bone passing out of wound.” The wounds did not result in his being discharged; he was captured during the Battle of Nashville on December 16, 1864. He was taken to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky arriving there on December 21; he was transferred immediately to Camp Douglas, Ohio where he arrived on December 24. He was released for exchange and sent to New Orleans, Louisiana where he was paroled on May 4, 1865. He married Sarah Ann Black on October 17, 1866 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Sarah died in 1875; John remarried on January 31, 1877 to Roberta Rebecca Black at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Private Howard died on May 11, 1903 at Quincy, and is interred at Eastern Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Roberta applied for and was granted a Confederate pension for John’s service.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John H. Howe was mustered out of service on April 26, 1865.[3]
  • Private H. T. Jackson enlisted May 12, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. Appointed Commissary Sergeant on May 12, 1862. He was discharged from service on July 14, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee after substituting William B. Landrum.[4][5]
  • Private John T. Johnson was born ca. 1826. In 1860 he along with wife Ann and four children were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as “newcomer’; he reported a personal worth of $5,000. He enlisted September 21, 1861 at Pensacola, Escambia County, Florida in Captain Gee’s Company (Company G, 1st Florida Infantry) for a period of 12 months. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 18, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until October 7, 1862 when he was assigned detached service as an ambulance and regimental teamster, through March 31, 1864. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 16, 1865. His description was given as 5’ 3” tall, dark hair, hazel eyes, and dark complexion. His date of death and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private William N. Johnson was born ca. 1823. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was listed as absent sick at Gadsden County for the period from his enlistment until June 30. He returned to the company, but was detached for service on December 9, 1862 with Knoxville City Police. He served there until April 30, 1863. He was present with the company from that date until he went missing in action at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. His date of death and place of interment are unknown.[3][4][5][14]
Rock Island Prison Barracks (Rock Island, Illinois). Located on a 946-acre island in the Mississippi River, Rock Island prison Barracks was operational for 20 months during the Civil War. Constructed in 1863 on approximately 12-acres, the prison had 84 wooden-framed barracks that each accommodated 120 prisoners. Rock Island Prison Barracks didn't receive Confederate prisoners until December 1863. The prison started with 468 prisoners, but within a few weeks the population was over 5,000 and eventually reached 8,594 prisoners. The prison had a 12 foot high wooden fence, sentry boxes every 100 feet, trenches inside the fence and bedrock that deterred tunneling to contain the prisoners. Escape would be difficult but not impossible, as prison records show 41 successful escapes.[55](Image credit: Wisconsin Historical Society, accessed 2015-11-21)
  • Private John H. Keadle was born ca. 1848 in Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida at the residence of his father, John H. Keadle, along with his mother and two brothers. Young John enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 15, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; he stated his age as “16”. He was listed as absent sick when the company was mustered into Confederate service on April 18, and would be absent from the company until March 12, 1863. He caught up with the company, and was present with it until November 25, 1863. During the period, he pulled guard duty with the City Police at Knoxville; once from August 16-17th, and again from August 22-23rd, 1863. He was reported as missing in action at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863; he was captured and sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky, then transferred to the Military Prison at Rock Island, Illinois on December 8, 1863. He enlisted in the U.S. Army at Rock Island, Illinois on October 31, 1864 and was assigned to frontier service. His date of death and place of interment are unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Thomas J. Kenady was born on March 3, 1837 at Early County, Georgia. His family relocated to Florida after 1845. His older sister, Ann, had married Seth Kirkland on October 4, 1852. Seth and his younger brother William were Thomas’ brothers-in-law. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father Alex, along with his mother and 9 brothers and sisters. His profession was given as laborer. In 1861, he and his brothers-in-law enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. Thomas reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 20, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company from the time of his enlistment until August 17, 1863 when he was assigned guard duty at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company the following day. Thomas suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $73.00; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. He was present with the company until February 17, 1864 when he was ordered into a hospital under Surgeon’s Orders. He was terribly wounded at Dallas, Georgia on May 28, 1864; gunshot wounds causing the loss of two fingers of his right hand, loss of one testicle, and two teeth, and shell fragment to his left foot. Despite the severity of these wounds, Thomas remained with the company and was with it when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. After the war, he was a member of United Confederate Veteran Camp Finegan. Private Kenady applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on October 23, 1923. He was interred by his youngest brother, Samuel W., at Pine Grove United Methodist Church Cemetery, Live Oak, Suwannee County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private D. W. King enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 12, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was listed as absent sick at Gadsden County for the period from his enlistment until June 30. He returned to the company, and was present with it until February 1, 1864 when he was granted a furlough of indulgence for 25 days. There is no further record of his service; the date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14]
  • Private Henry Bascomb King was born on August 15, 1846 at Nassau County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his Josiah near King’s Ferry, Nassau County, Florida along with his mother, and older sister and a younger brother. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; he stated his age as “21” (his date of birth on the 1860 census puts his age at 14 years; another source puts his age between 17 and 18 years). On May 4, 1862 he is shown as enlisting with Captain J. C. Evans’ (Company C, “Gulf State Infantry”).[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Seth H. Kirkland was born ca. 1833 in Georgia. He married Ann Kenady (older sister of Thomas J. Kenady) on October 4, 1852. In 1860 he, along with Ann, 2 infant children, and younger brother William, were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming; he owned real estate valued at $400 and reported a personal worth of $400. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”, along with younger brother William and brother-in-law Thomas J. Kenady. Seth reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 4, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff Liberty County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when the company left the state, but had returned to it by June 30, 1862. He was promoted to 2nd Corporal on August 1, 1862. He and several others were accidentally wounded by the discharge of a gun (artillery) at Big Hill, Kentucky on October 10, 1862; he was left in a hospital near Big Hill when Confederate forces withdrew from the state. He succumbed to his wounds on December 8, 1862 at Richmond, Kentucky. Seth’s place of interment is unknown. His son, Washington Lafayette Kirkland, was born February 21, 1861 and is buried in the Okapilco Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Quitman, Brooks County, Georgia and beside his grave a memorial marker to his father was placed by his second great granddaughter.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William J. Kirkland was born ca. 1841 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living at the home of his brother, Seth, near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as laborer. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”, along with older brother Seth and brother-in-law Thomas J. Kenady. William reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 20, 1862 at Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when the company left the state, but had returned to it by June 30, 1862. William was left to act as a nurse with wounded at Big Hill, Kentucky on October 15, 1862. He was captured by Union forces on October 29; he was sent to City Point, Virginia on February 7, 1863; from there to Fort McHenry, Maryland on February 11, and from there to Fort Monroe on February 14. He was exchanged shortly thereafter, and returned to the company at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. William was admitted to the hospital there, and died of pneumonia on March 22, 1863. William’s place of interment is unknown. His nephew, Washington Lafayette Kirkland, was born February 21, 1861 and is buried in the Okapilco Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery, Quitman, Brooks County, Georgia and beside his grave a memorial marker to his uncle was placed by his second great grandniece.[3][4][5]
  • Private Benjamin F. Lambert was born ca. 1841 in Florida. His family had relocated from Virginia between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his mother Lucy near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with an older sister and two older brothers (James L. and Thomas), both of whom served in the same company. Madame Lambert was a woman of no small means, owning real estate valued at $3,000 and a personal worth of $10,000. Benjamin’s profession was given as laborer. Benjamin enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; he stated his age as “20”. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until November 24, 1862 when he died at Cumberland Gap, Kentucky. His place on interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private James L. Lambert was born ca. 1837 in Virginia. His family had relocated from Virginia between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his mother Lucy near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with an older sister and two younger brothers (Thomas and Benjamin F.), both of whom served in the same company. Madame Lambert was a woman of no small means, owning real estate valued at $3,000 and a personal worth of $10,000. James’ profession was given as laborer. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 15, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida; he stated his age as “22”. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until May 14, 1864. He was appointed 3rd Corporal on May 7, 1863; his only documented absences from the company were two assignments in Knoxville, Tennessee. He was assigned police duty on the streets of Knoxville, Tennessee on the 17th-18 August, and then as Corporal of the Guard on August 22–23. James lost his right arm at Resaca, Georgia during the battle on May 14, 1864; he was apparently furloughed home to recuperate, as he was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 18, 1865. The date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Thomas Lambert was born on ca. 1839 in Virginia. His family had relocated from Virginia between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his mother Lucy near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with an older sister and two brothers (James L., older; & Benjamin F., younger), both of whom served in the same company. Madame Lambert was a woman of no small means, owning real estate valued at $3,000 and a personal worth of $10,000. Thomas’ profession was given as laborer. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; he stated his age as “22”. He was reported as being sick at Atlanta, Georgia, likely after June 14. He was also listed as being absent without leave from the company from July 25, 1862 to November 12, 1862; he was reported as being sick at Gadsden County, Florida. He returned to the company by November 12, 1862 and was present with it until November 28, 1863 when he was granted a furlough of 30 days, which he took in Florida. He returned to the company prior to January 1, 1864. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 15, 1865. His description was given as 6’ tall, dark hair, light skin, and grey eyes. He married a Josephine C. [last name unknown, as are the date and place of the nuptials]. Thomas died at his home at Gadsden County, Florida on May 27, 1877; his place of interment is unknown. Josephine applied for and was granted a Confederate pension for Thomas’ service.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William B. Landrum enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on July 14, 1862 at Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee as a substitute for Private H. T. Jackson. He was present with the company until January 1863, when he was detached for service as a tanner at Knoxville. He is last recorded on a muster roll for January–February, 1864; it documents his detached service, but states that his whereabouts are unknown. The date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14]
  • Private Jacob R. Langston (younger brother of Jonathan B. Langston) was born on January 12, 1842 at Darlington District, South Carolina. His family had relocated from South Carolina sometime after 1848. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father John near Blue Creek in Liberty County, Florida along with his mother, 2 older brothers, and a younger brother and sister. Jacob’s father was farmer of no small means, owning real estate valued at $3,000 and a personal worth of $4,935. Jacob’s profession was given as farm laborer. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 18, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida; he stated his age as “19”. He was absent sick at Liberty County, but was able to rejoin the company before June 30, 1862. He took ill again at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 28, but recovered sufficiently to return to the company about November 12, 1862. He was present with the company from that time until October 28, 1863 when he was ordered into the Direction Hospital at Griffin, Georgia due to contracting smallpox. He was furloughed to recover at home, and was returning to the company when the war ended. He turned back and surrendered at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled from there one week later. He and Mary C. Modlin were married in September, 1867. Jacob applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on August 21, 1916 and is interred at Smith Creek Cemetery, Smith Creek, Wakulla County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private James Langston[3]
  • Private Jonathan B. Langston (older brother of Jacob R. Langston) was born on October 17, 1837 at Darlington District, South Carolina. His family had relocated from South Carolina sometime after 1848. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father John near Blue Creek in Liberty County, Florida along with his mother, 3 younger brothers and a younger sister. Jonathan’s father was farmer of no small means, owning real estate valued at $3,000 and a personal worth of $4,935. Jonathan’s profession was given as farm laborer. Jonathan married Celia A. McMillian at Wakulla County, Florida on November 22, 1860. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 18, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was absent sick at Liberty County, but was able to rejoin the company before June 30, 1862. He took ill again at on August 28, 1862 and was left at Barboursville, Kentucky. He returned to the company about November 12, 1862, and was present with it until March 28, 1863 when he was medically discharged at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee due to variola. and poor health. His discharged described him as 6’ tall, fair skin, brown hair, blue eyes, and by occupation a farmer. His health improved sufficiently to permit his return to military service; he enlisted with Company B (Smith’s Company), 5th Battalion of Florida Cavalry on July 15, 1863 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Jonathan surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 17, 1865. After the war, Jonathan served as the postmaster at Smith’s Creek, Wakulla County, Florida. Jonathan died at his home at Smith Creek, Wakulla County, Florida on September 12, 1900 and is interred at Smith Creek Cemetery, Smith Creek, Wakulla County, Florida. Celia applied for and was granted a Confederate pension for Jonathan’s service.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William Langston was born ca. 1835 in South Carolina. In 1860, he was living near Blue Creek, Liberty County, Florida with his wife Rachall. William was farmer, owning real estate valued at $1,000 and a personal worth of $245. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 18, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was absent sick at Liberty County, and was unable to rejoin the company before November 12, 1862. He was present with the company from that date until April 7, 1863 when he was left sick at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. He was reported with the company from April 30 until July 10, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was furloughed from there on September 23 for a period of 40 days. He returned to the company about November 1 and was present with it through the end of the year; he was sent back to a hospital under Surgeon’s orders on January 3, 1864. There is no further record of his service; the date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Charles E. Long was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence of a Madame Elizabeth Gregory, along with her daughter Julia, and Cressy Shelfer, a young lady of 14 years. Madame Gregory was a woman of no small means, owning real estate valued at $5,000 and a personal worth of $15,000; Julia was also well-to-do, with a personal worth of $10,000. Charles’ profession was given as overseeing. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 22, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; he stated his age as “18”. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until September 24, 1862 when he was transferred to the regimental band. He is last recorded as being in that service at the end of February, 1864; there are no further records of his service. The date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private David B. Mandel l was born ca. 1834 in Germany. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on June 14, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. He was honorably discharged under certificate of disability issued at Knoxville, Tennessee on July 21, 1862 due to a congenital hernia. At the time of his discharge, he was described as 5’ 8” tall, light skin, hazel eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a merchant. He applied to Confederate Secretary of War George W. Randolph for an appointment as a Captain & Assistant Commissary on September 3, 1862 at Quincy, Florida. There is no record of his having received the appointment, nor are there further records of his service. The date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[4][5][14]
  • Private Samuel McAlilley was born ca. 1835 in South Carolina. His family had relocated to Florida from South Carolina between 1840 and 1844. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father John near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida along with his mother, an older sister, two younger sisters and two younger brothers. Samuel’s profession was given as a laborer. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 19, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Samuel was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until August 14, 1862, when he was reported absent sick at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company prior to November 2, 1862 and was present with it from that date until he was wounded in action at Chickamauga on 19 September 1863; he died in a field hospital one week later. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Arlington McAlpin was born on march 1st, 1832 at Gadsden County, Florida. He married Margaret Elizabeth (Eliza) Dolan on May 9, 1859 at Gadsden County Florida. Three months after the marriage, Elizabeth freely relinquished her dower property, formerly given to her by Deed of Gift by her mother, Ellen Dolan. On August 25, 1859, an inventory of Eliza’s property was conducted to comply with a statute known as “Woman's Law.”[56] The inventory showed that Ellen Dolan provided nine head of hogs before their marriage and Arlington provided seven head of cows. In 1860, Arlington was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida with Eliza and infant daughter, Mary who was born about a month before the 1860 US Census was conducted. Arlington was farmer, owning real estate valued at $200 and a personal worth of $400. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 19, 1862 and mustered out of service on April 26, 1865. Arlington returned to Gadsden County; Eliza bore him another seven children. Arlington died at the age of 70 on December 9, 1902, and is interred at McAlpin Cemetery, Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][15]
  • Private A. McClellan was mustered into service on March 19, 1862 and mustered out of service on April 26, 1865.[3]
  • Private Hardy McCullers was born ca. 1842 in Alabama. In 1860, he was living at the residence of Pharo Crops, in the Pickett’s District of Gadsden County, Florida. He was a laborer, most likely employed on Mr. Crops farm; Mr. Crops was blessed with 7 children, all female except 2-year old John. Hardy enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was left sick at Gadsden County, Florida when the company left the state, but had returned to it by June 30, 1862. He again took ill and was hospitalized late September/early October, 1862 at Frankfort, Kentucky. He died in the hospital on October 4, 1862, and is interred in local cemetery.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private F. L. McNair was mustered into service on March 12, 1862 and mustered out of service on April 26, 1865.[3]
  • Private Christopher Columbus McPhaul was born ca. 1843 in Florida. His family had relocated from North Carolina between 1837 and 1838; his mother was listed on the 1850 census, but is absent from the 1860 census. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father Duncan near Mount Pleasant in Gadsden County, Florida along older sister Ella, older brother Hamilton (who served in the same company), and younger brothers William and John. Christopher’s father was farmer of no small means, owning real estate valued at $1,000 and a personal worth of $4,000. Christopher’s profession was given as farm laborer; he had attended school within 12 months of the 1860 census. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 15, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was present from the time the company when it left the state until October 9, 1862 when he was left at Versailles, Kentucky. He was reported as being on furlough in Florida for the period of November 12, 1862 through February 9, 1863; he apparently exceeded the authorized period, for he was also carried as absent without leave on the same report. He was reported as present with the company from February 9 until November 25, 1863. During that period, pulled guard duty at the city jail at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 16–17, and was posted the following day to the city police and relieved on the following day. Christopher was reported missing in action on November 25, 1863 at Missionary Ridge. He had suffered a gunshot wound to his right lung; he was apparently captured and transported to the U.S. Hospital at Chattanooga, Tennessee where he died on December 3, 1863. His place of interment is unknown.[4][5][14][15]
"The family of Hamilton McPhaul and his second wife Melissa Sanders Creswell McPhaul.""Pictured left to right: Mamie Duncan McPhaul [later Dykes] (1878-[1948], daughter by first wife, Adaline Johns), Hamilton McPhaul [1837-1896], Thomas Ralph McPhaul (1882-1949), Stella McPhaul [later Holman and then Cooper] (1884-1964), Horace Hamilton McPhaul (1886-1938), Willie Frances Creswell [later Bevis] (1876-1899, daughter by Melissa's first husband William Stanley Creswell), and Melissa Sanders Creswell McPhaul (1850-1909)." Image credit: State Archives of Florida")
  • Private Hamilton McPhaul was born ca. 1837 in Florida. His family had relocated from North Carolina between 1837-1838; his mother was listed on the 1850 census, but is absent from the 1860 census. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father Duncan near Mount Pleasant in Gadsden County, Florida along older sister Ella, and younger brothers Christopher (who served in the same company), William and John. Christopher’s father was farmer of no small means, owning real estate valued at $1,000 and a personal worth of $4,000. Hamilton’s profession was given as farm laborer; he had attended school within 12 months of the 1860 census. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 19, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was absent sick at Gadsden County, but was able to rejoin the company before June 30, 1862. Hamilton was present with the company from June 30, 1862 until April 7, 1863 when he was left sick at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. He was captured at New Market, Tennessee, some 7 miles east-northeast of Strawberry Plains on June 21, 1863. He apparently was able to escape; he was reported present with the company on July 9, and remained with it until February 19, 1864. During this period, he suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $13.30; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. On February 19, 1864, he was ordered into a hospital while at Dalton, Georgia. Hamilton returned to the company, and was with it through the remainder of the war; he received a gunshot wound in the right leg at Bentonville, North Carolina on March 19, 1865, and was admitted General Hospital No. 10 at Salisbury, North Carolina, from where he was paroled on May 2, 1865. He was admitted to the 2nd Division, 23 A.C. Hospital on May 20, 1865 where he endured the above-knee amputation of his right leg as a result of his wounding at Bentonville. He was discharged from the hospital on June 25, 1865; his rank was stated as “Corporal”. Hamilton took the Oath of Allegiance at Salisbury, North Carolina on June 21, 1865. He married Adaline (née Johns) on 24 March 1878 in Gadsden County, Florida. They had one child born in November 1878; there is no further record of Adaline. Hamilton taught in public schools in Gadsden County, and was a Justice of the Peace in 1878. In 1880, he gave his occupation as “getting lumber for the railroad”. Hamilton married the widow Malissa (Sanders) Creswell on November 9, 1881, who also had a daughter by her previous marriage. Hamilton and Malissa had three children together. In 1885, Hamilton was both a farmer and a post office worker. In that same year, he also served as the official enumerator for the 1885 census of Gadsden County, Florida. Hamilton died on September 28, 1887 at Mount Pleasant, Gadsden County, Florida and is interred at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. Malissa applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for Hamilton’s service.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John McPhaul was born ca. 1839 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence of William C. Rogers near Quincy, in Gadsden County, Florida. Rogers was a man of some means; he declared himself a famer, with real estate valued at $4,000 and a personal estate of some $6,000. McPhaul was also quite comfortable; he did not have a profession, but declared a personal worth of $2,000. McPhaul enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on April 30, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was absent sick at Gadsden County, but was able to rejoin the company before June 30, 1862. He was present from June 30 until December 8, 1862 when he was absent in the hospital due to sickness. McPhaul returned to the company on March 12, 1863 and was present with it until September 20, 1863 when he was killed in action at Chickamauga, Georgia. His place of interment is unknown.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Archibald McPherson was born on June 26, 1810 at Chapel Hill, Orange County, North Carolina. Archibald relocated to Barbour County, Alabama prior to 1842; he married Kitty Ann (née Tew) at Barbour County, Alabama on December 19, 1842. They had 6 children together; Kitty died ca. 1856 at Barbour County, Alabama. Archibald relocated his family to Marianna, Jackson County, Florida ca. 1857. He married Deborah Ann (née Edinfield) on September 21, 1859 at Marianna, Jackson County, Florida. In 1860, he was living near Marianna, Jackson County, Florida. He, along with sons James and Alexander, enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 20, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. He was reported to have contracted measles in May, but was accounted present with the company when it departed the state, and was promoted to 1st Corporal early in 1863. He is recorded as being present with the company from the time it left the state until May 6, 1863 when he died in a hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee due to pneumonia. Archibald is interred at Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee. Deborah applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for Hamilton’s service.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private J. C. Mercer enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on May 11, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. He was absent sick at Gadsden County, but was able to rejoin the company before June 30, 1862. He was present from June 30 until October 6, 1862 when he died in a hospital at Lexington, Kentucky. Private Mercer is interred at Lexington National Cemetery, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky.[4][5][14]
  • Private C. Peter Muller was born ca. 1825 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence of Daniel Sparkman near Palatka, Putnam County, Florida. Muller declared a personal worth of $100, and his employment as a farm laborer. He enlisted in Company B, Holland’s Battalion, Florida Volunteers[57] on September 28, 1861 at Fernandina, Nassau County Florida. He was present with the company until June 10, 1862 when he was transferred to Davidson’s company in a direct exchange for Corporal Robert Emmett Jones. Muller was officially enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on June 14, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company until August 30, 1863 when he was left at a hospital at London, Tennessee. He is recorded as being employed as a Nurse on a roster issued by the Foard Hospital at Marietta, Georgia beginning on October 1, 1863; however, he continued to carried as absent from the company at London, Tennessee until February 16, 1864. He was admitted under Surgeon’s order into the Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, Georgia on April 8, 1864 and was discharged the following day. There are no further records of his service. The date and place of his death, and place of interment are unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Adam J. Paramore was born ca. 1825 at Wetumpka, Gadsden County, Florida. He married Ann Elizabeth (née McJunkin) on February 12, 1850 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he, along with Ann and 5 children (all boys; the oldest 9 and the youngest 2), were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as overseeing; he reported a personal worth of $100. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was detailed to service as a nurse to remain in Florida with the company’s sick when the company left the state. He returned to the company in June, but died of unspecified cause on August 13, 1862 while the regiment was encamped at Knoxville, Tennessee. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Stephen A. Parker was born at Marion County, Georgia ca. 1837. He married Margaret Ann (née Boykin) in Florida ca. 1856. In 1860 he and Margaret were living in the Tologee District near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a farm laborer, with a personal worth of $200. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was described as being 6’ 0” tall, light complexion, blue eyes, and light hair. He was listed as sick at Gadsden County prior to June 30 of 1862, but rejoined the company after that date and was with it until April 17, 1863 when he died of [unspecified] disease in a hospital at New Market, Tennessee. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John J. Penny was born in Alabama ca. 1836. He married Emeline (née unknown) in Florida ca. 1859-1860. In 1860 he and Emeline were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a laborer, with a personal worth of $100. He enlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; his age was given as 26 years. He was listed as sick at Gadsden County prior to June 30 of 1862, but rejoined the company after that date. He fell ill again on August 15, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was discharged from service at Knoxville Hospital on October 27, 1862. His Certificate of Disability for Discharge dated October 26, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee stated that he was discharged for debility and chronic rheumatism in both lower extremities, requiring the use of a crutch in standing and walking. He was described as being born at Sumpter County, Georgia, aged 26 years, 5’ 9” tall, fair complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a farmer. He returned to Florida after being discharged; one year later, he enlisted with Company D, 5th Battalion Florida Cavalry. He survived the war and was paroled at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 20, 1865. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is his place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Andrew J. Peters was born on June 6, 1836 at Randolph County, Georgia. In 1860 he and wife Samantha, along with two minor wards were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a harness maker, with a personal worth of $200. His initial enlistment occurred on May 22, 1861 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Gee’s Company (Company A, 4th Florida Infantry) for a period of 12 months. Ordered on special duty by Governor Madison Stark Perry making cartridge boxes. He reenlisted in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment through December 16, 1864, serving as the company’s’ cook between November and December 1863. He was captured at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky where he arrived on December 22. He was transferred to the military prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, where arrived on January 4, 1865. He was released from Camp Chase on June 12, 1865 after signing the Oath of Allegiance. His description was given as fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes, 5’ 9” tall, 29 years old, and place of residence as Gadsden County, Florida. Andrew applied for a Florida Confederate Pension on January 1, 1906 which was denied, as he had not been a “continuous’ resident of the state since the end of the war. He applied (ca. 1910) for and was awarded a Georgia Confederate Pension. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is his place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Francis M. Peters was born ca. 1842. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Francis stated his age as 20. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment through December 15, 1863, and was briefly detailed as a wagon guard from November 1 to November 12, 1863. He was ordered into a hospital by a Surgeon on December 15, 1863. Private Peters died of disease [unspecified] while in the hospital at Oxford, Georgia on February 10, 1864. [Hood Hospital, Covington, Georgia]. He is interred at Confederate Soldiers Cemetery, Oxford, Newton County, Georgia.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private Handy Peters was born in Georgia ca. 1837. He married Isabella (née Ward) on August 3, 1853 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he, along with wife Isabella and three daughters, were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a painter. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Handy stated his age as 26. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until December 19, 1862, when he was assigned detached duty to the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee where he served until he was admitted to the Asylum Hospital at Knoxville for sickness. He remained hospitalized there until September 30, 1863 and was furloughed to a hospital at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida for a period of 60 days. He returned to the company sometime after February, 1864; he was reported to have deserted. His name appears on a roll of deserters from the Rebel Army received July 16, 1864; he was discharged by Federal forces on July 18, 1864 having signed the Oath of Allegiance with a promise to remain north of the Ohio River during the war. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is his place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John E. Pittman was born in Florida ca. 1844. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Owen’s residence along with his mother Elizabeth and three younger brothers. John’s parents were well-off; Owen was a carpenter, and Elizabeth reported holding real estate valued at $3,000, and a personal estate valued at $1,000. John and his siblings had all attended school with twelve months of the 1860 census. John enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was rejected by the inspecting officer on April 18, 1862 (likely about the time that regiment was taken into Confederate service); however, his rejection was apparently overturned, as he was reported present with the company from June 30, 1862 through October 15, 1863. During the period, he pulled guard duty with the City Police at Knoxville from August 16-17th. On October 15, 1863, he was granted a furlough of 60 days from Forsythe, Georgia as a result of having been wounded (likely on the 19th or 20 September at Chickamauga). He returned to the company in January, 1864, and remained with it until he was captured at Nashville on December 16, 1864. He was sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky where he arrived on December 22. He was transferred to the military prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, where arrived on January 6, 1865. John died while in captivity, and is interred at Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Timothy Renew was born at Barnwell, South Carolina ca. 1820. He enlisted March 28, 1862 at Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; he stated his age as 41. He was rejected by an Inspecting Officer when the company was mustered into Confederate service on April 18, 1862.[58][3][4][5][14][36]
  • Private Stephen Jacob Revell was born on December 6, 1843 at Darlington County, South Carolina. In 1860 he was living with his father and mother near Blue Creek, Liberty County, Florida. He enlisted for state service on September 14, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry. He reenlisted in Davidson’s Company on April 6, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida; he stated his age as 17. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until December 19, 1862 when he was detached for service with the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee. He performed his detached service until June 22, 1863 when he was granted a furlough of 40 days in Florida due to illness. He was reported absent without leave from November 1, 1863 through February 29, 1864. He did eventually return to the company; he was captured at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky where he arrived on December 22. He was transferred to the military prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, where arrived on January 4, 1865. He was released from Camp Chase on June 12, 1865 after signing the Oath of Allegiance. His description was given as dark complexion, dark hair, brown eyes, 5’ 8” tall, 20 years old, and place of residence as Liberty County, Florida. After the war, he returned to Liberty County and became a minister. He married Mary Savannah (née Strickland) ca. 1866; they had seven children together. Stephen applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension. Mary Savannah passed away on January 20, 1920. He married his second wife, Etta (née Eubanks) on February 15, 1921. Stephen died on April 13th, 1924 at Bristol, Liberty County, Florida. He is interred at Lake Mystic Cemetery, Bristol, Liberty County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William U. Robertson was born on December 22, 1838 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Bristol, Liberty County, Florida, at his father John’s residence along with his mother Penelope. William was the oldest of ten children; he had five brothers and four sisters. William worked as a farm laborer. He enlisted on April 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; he stated his age as 22. He was with the company when it left the state, but was absent sick at Chattanooga, Tennessee prior to June 30, 1862. He was present with the company from that date until December 19, 1862 when he was detached for duty with the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee where he served until April 30, 1863. During this period, he was promoted to 3rd Sergeant. He returned to the company and was with it until its surrender at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. William returned to Bristol and married Elizabeth Fleming (née Shepard) ca. 1870; they had one child together. Elizabeth passed away on October 7, 1907. William applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension on July 28, 1909. The exact date of his death is unknown, but is recorded by one source as 1922. He is interred at Meacham Cemetery, Bristol, Liberty County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William E. Robinson was born ca. 1827 in Florida. In 1860 he, along with wife Quintine and two-year old son, were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; William stated his age as 38. He took ill after the company had arrived had departed the state. He was left sick at Atlanta, Georgia in May, and subsequently detailed as a hospital nurse for a brief period. He rejoined the company prior to August 13, 1862; he (along with others from the company) was left sick at Barboursville, Kentucky when army departed that place for Lexington. He was captured by Federal forces on September 4, and paroled the same day. William made his way back to Knoxville; he apparently had no recovered his health, and went into the hospital at Knoxville, succumbing to his affliction on October 9, 1862. He is interred at Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Jerry Rudd was born in Georgia ca. 1832. In 1860 he, along with wife Nancy and two children, were living in the Pickett’s District near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming, with real estate valued at $200 and a personal estate of some $300. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; William stated his age as 29. He was present with the company from his enlistment until he was captured at Harrodsburg, Kentucky after Confederate forces withdrew; he is documented as awaiting exchange onboard the steamer “Maria Denning” near Vicksburg, Mississippi on November 15, 1862.) He returned to the company shortly after, and remained with it until September 20, 1863 when he was mortally wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia. He was taken to Preston’s Division Hospital,[59] where he died on September 23, 1863. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Samuel T. Rudd was born in South Carolina ca. 1826. In 1860 he, along with wife Anne and five children, were living in the Concord near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming, with real estate valued at $200 and a personal estate of some $450. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Samuel stated his age as 38. He was absent sick when the company left the state, but rejoined it by June 30, 1862. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until December 16, 1864 when he was captured at Nashville, Tennessee. He was sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky where he arrived on December 22. He was transferred to the military prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, where arrived on January 6, 1865. He was paroled from Camp Chase on May 2, 1865, and sent to New Orleans, Louisiana to await exchange. He was admitted to the USA General Hospital No. 2 at Vicksburg, Mississippi on May 13, 1865 with chronic diarrhea. He signed the Oath of Allegiance at Tallahassee, Florida On May 16, 1865; his description was given as fair complexion, light hair, blue eyes, 5’ 9” tall, 29 years old, and place of residence as Gadsden County, Florida. Samuel died on December 4, 1892. The places of his death and interment are unknown. Anne applied for a Florida Confederate Widow’s Pension for Samuel’s service in 1897 at Wetumpka, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Asa C. Sapp was born ca. 1815. He enlisted April 4, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Samuel stated his age as 47. He was absent sick from the date of his enlistment until March until March 12, 1863. He finally joined with his company, and was with it until October 28, 1863 when he was ordered to a hospital by the Surgeon. From that time through at least November 17, 1864 he was reported as absent sick, either at Quincy, Florida, or at St. Mary’s Hospital at Montgomery, Alabama. He was reported t be present with the company when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is his place of interment.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private Reuben Seaberry was born in Florida ca. 1843. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden, Florida, at his mother Milbray’s residence along with four younger sisters. William worked as a laborer. He enlisted on May 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He took ill after the company had departed the state, and was as left sick at Atlanta, Georgia prior to June 30. He died of unspecified disease at Doctor D. O. C. Heery’s hospital at Atlanta, Georgia on July 9, 1862. Rueben is interred at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Benjamin F. Shepard was born in Florida ca. 1837. He married Susan Ann (née McDougal) on October 13, 1859 at Gadsden County Florida. In 1860 he and Susan were living in the Pickett’s District near Bristol, Gadsden County, Florida. Benjamin worked as an overseer. He enlisted on May 3, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was absent sick when the company left the state, but rejoined it by June 30, 1862. He was present with the company from that date until November 29, 1863; during that period, he was detailed to the city police at Knoxville, Tennessee on April 14, 1863, but returned to the company by April 30. He was sent to the hospital by the Surgeon on November 29, 1863. He was reported present with the company in January, 1864. During the retreat following the Battle of Nashville (December 15-16th, 1864), his throat and lungs were so affected by the cold that he was unable to speak for three months; he was hospitalized at Meridian, Mississippi on January 20, 1865. He never rejoined his company; he surrendered himself at Tallahassee on May 10, 1865 and was paroled six days later upon taking the Oath of Allegiance. His physical description was documented as being 5’ 10” tall with dark hair and blue eyes. Benjamin applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on August 21, 1904 at Gadsden County Florida, and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Fountain H. Shepard was born April 4, 1833 at Gadsden County, Florida. He married Mahala C. (née Pickett) in 1854. In 1860 he, along with wife Mahala and two sons, were living in the Concord near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming, with real estate valued at $400 and a personal estate of some $1,400. He enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Fountain stated his age as 28. He was present with the company when it departed the state, and was promoted to 3rd Corporal on August 1, 1862, and then to 1st Corporal early in 1863. He was present with the company until November 30, 1863 when he was given a furlough of 30 days due to being wounded at Missionary Ridge on November 23. The injury caused the loss of the fore-finger of the left hand, and damaged the wrist; he had not returned to the company by the end of February, 1864. He may have not healed sufficiently to have returned in any case; he surrendered at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled from there ten days later. Fountain applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on January 17, 1905, and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John J. Sikes was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860 he was living near Bristol, Liberty County, Florida, at his father Edward’s residence along with his mother Elizabeth. John had two older sisters and one younger brother. He enlisted on May 4, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. John was present with the company from the date of enlistment through September 19, 1863. During that period, he pulled police duty on the streets at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 22, 1863 and was relieved on August 23, 1863. He was mortally wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia on September 20, 1863 and sent to the Fairground Hospital # 1 at Atlanta. John died of his wound on October 22, 1863, and is interred at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private J. C. Smith was transferred from Captain Nelson’s Independent Company of Georgia Cavalry to Company A on March 25, 1863 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was reported sick in the hospital through April 30. He was transferred to a hospital at London Tennessee in May, and was granted a furlough from there on June 11 for a period of 60 days. He was reported absent without leave from the expiration of his furlough through December, 1864. There is no further record of his service from that date.[5][14]
  • Private William J. Smith was born ca. 1839 in Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden, Florida. He resided with an older sister, 3 younger brothers and a younger sister. He was recorded as a pauper, and unable to read or write. He enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; William stated his age as 24. He was absent sick when the company left the state, but rejoined it by June 30, 1862. He was assigned to detached service as a wagoner on July 20, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee and service in that capacity through November 12. He was again detached for that service from December 22, 1862 through February 9, 1863. William was present with the company from that time until April 27, when he was detached to serve as part of a prisoner escort to Richmond, Virginia; he returned to the company on April 30. He was present with the company from that date through December 22, 1864; during that period, he pulled police duty on the streets at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 22, 1863 and was relieved on August 23, 1863. He also suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $13.30; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. He was captured at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Louisville Kentucky where he arrived on December 22. He was transferred to the military prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, where arrived on January 4, 1865. William died of variola while in captivity on March 4, 1865 and is interred at Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William T. Smith was born ca. 1840 in Florida. In 1860 he was living near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida, at his mother Sarah’s residence along with two younger female wards, Ann Stricklin and Margaret Lewis. William was educated, being enrolled in school within 12 months of the census. He enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; he stated his age as 20. William was present with the company from his date of enlistment until October 31, 1863 when he was hospitalized under Surgeon’s order. He returned to the company in November, and was present with it until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Catawba Bridge, South Carolina on May 5, 1865. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Lemuel P. Suber was born on October 25, 1843 at Newberry County, South Carolina. In 1860 he was living near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida, at his mother Elizabeth’s residence along with an older brother, 4 younger brothers and 2 younger sisters. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted into Confederate service on April 5, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; he stated his age as 18. He was present with the company from his enlistment until December 22, 1862, when was assigned to detached service as a wagoner on at Knoxville, Tennessee until February 9, 1863. He suffered a pay stoppage for “ordnance stores lost” between November 1 and December 31, 1863 in the amount of $1.50; this likely due to the Confederate defeat at Missionary Ridge on November 25. Except for his detached service, he was present on all rolls, and was present with it until it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. Lemuel returned to Florida, and married Emeline (née Cowan) on December 2, 1866. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. Emeline passed on April 7, 1927; Lemuel passed on January 3rd, 1928. They are both interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private George Sweatman was born ca. 1846 in Florida. In 1860 he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, at the residence of David G. Connell, a farmer of some means with real estate valued at $1,8000 and a personnel estate valued at $2,000. George and his younger sister Martha were enrolled in school. He enlisted on May 5, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was with the company when it left the state, but took ill at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 28, 1862. He was granted a furlough of 60 days on November 2, 1862 and returned to Florida to convalesce. He never returned to the company, being discharged by civil authorities on March 3, 1863. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private James Sweeney was born ca. 1838 in Tennessee. In 1860 he was living at the residence of Nancy White in Carroll County, Tennessee. He was a farm laborer. He enlisted on June 4, 1862 at Louden, Louden County Tennessee in Captain Davidson’s Company, as a substitute for John W. Poindexter. He was left sick near Stevenson, Alabama on June 27, 1863 and never returned to the company. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private James Taylor was born ca. 1838 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Marianna, Calhoun County, Florida, at his mother Elizabeth’s residence along with two younger sisters and three younger brothers. James was a laborer, and married Nancy prior to his enlistment. He enlisted on May 12, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was left sick at Calhoun County when the company left the state, but rejoined it after June 30 in Tennessee. He took ill again on October 28, 1862, and was sent to the Fairground Hospital #1 at Atlanta shortly after; he died there on December 17, 1862. James is interred at Oakland Cemetery, Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private P. F. M. Thomas enlisted on April 21, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; his age was given as 24 years. He drowned in the Apalachicola River on May 15, 1862.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private William Andrew Thomas was born on February 14, 1843 in Dooley County, Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Jasper, Hamilton County, Florida, at his father Robert’s residence along with his mother, a twin sister, two younger sisters and three younger brothers. His father was a physician, and reported holding real estate in the value of $6,000, and a personal estate valued at $27,000. He enlisted on March 21, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was wounded in the left hip by a shell fragment on July 28, 1864 while in action west of Atlanta. William was present with the company when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. After the war, he married Oregon U. (née unknown). He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. William died on January 5, 1918 and is interred at Narcoossee Arthur Fell Cemetery, Saint Cloud, Osceola County, Florida.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Tobias Thompson was born ca. 1838 in Georgia. In 1860 he, along with wife Rebecca and two daughters, were living near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as carpenter with a personal estate of some $100. He enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Tobias stated his age as 39. He was left sick at Gadsden County when the company left the state, but rejoined it after June 30 in Tennessee. He took ill again and died at Knoxville, Tennessee on September 10, 1862. He was reported to be interred at a “local Bethel Cemetery”, the exact location is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private A. B. Thornton was born ca. 1834 in Georgia. 1860 he, along with wife Alema were living near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as a laborer with a personal estate of some $100. He enlisted on May 5, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was left sick at Gadsden County when the company left the state, but rejoined it after June 30 in Tennessee. He was assigned for detached service as a wagoner on July 20, 1862 and served in that assignment until October 11, 1863 when he was admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospitals at Macon, Georgia with an unspecified fever. He returned to duty briefly, but was again admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospitals on December 13, 1863 as a result of a gunshot wound to his left ankle. He released from the hospital on February 1, 1864 with a furlough of 45 days. There is no further record of his service; the date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private Benjamin S. Tolar was born ca. 1837 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father William’s residence along with his mother and an older sister. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted on May 15, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. He was left sick at Gadsden County when the company left the state; he was carried as absent without leave beginning on August10th, 1862. He had rejoined the company by November 12, 1862 and was present with it until April 25, 1863. On that date, he was a patient in a hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee and succumbed to typhoid fever. He is interred at Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.[4][5][14][15]
  • Private John W. Tolar was born ca. 1835 in Georgia. He married Suannah Caroline “Susan” (née Holland) in 1857. In 1860 he, Susan and their infant son were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming, with real estate valued at $200 and a personal estate of $300. In 1861, he enlisted in Captain Rabon Scarborough’s Florida State Militia Company, the “Dixie Blues”. He reenlisted with Captain Gregory’s Company (Company H, 5th Florida Infantry) on May 7, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida; he was exchanged June 12, 1862 for Private Thomas F. Barr. He was absent sick at Gadsden County, but rejoined the company before June 30. He was discharged on December 18th, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee for disability. His documents stated that he was 5’ 6” tall, with light skin, blue eyes, and dark brown hair. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Larkin Tolar was born on July 30, 1828 in Georgia. In 1860 he, along with wife Eady and three young sons were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. The census lists his occupation as farming, with real estate valued at $200 and a personal estate of $200. He reenlisted on May 3, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company. Larkin was with the company when it departed the state, but took ill in Kentucky in August; he was left sick at Lexington, Kentucky on September 17, 1862. He was captured there by Federal forces on October 17 and sent to Louisville, Kentucky. He was transferred from there on November 18 to Cairo, Illinois on the steamboat “Belle Creole”. At the time of his transfer to Cairo, his physical description was recorded as 34 years, 5’ 10” tall, dark eyes, dark hair, and dark complexion. He is believed to have died at Cairo, Alexander County, Illinois on December 1, 1862; however, the date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private John Vendrick was born on April 2, 1845 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Wiley’s residence along with his mother Marinda and his older brother Nathan. His father was a farmer of no small means, who reported holding real estate in the value of $2,200, and a personal estate valued at $2,000. Both John and his older brother were educated, having attended school with 12 months of the census. John and his brother enlisted on March 28, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; John stated his age as 16.[60] John was reported present with the company from the date of his enlistment, and was present with it when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. After the war, John relocated to Brundidge, Pike County, Alabama and married Adella (née Ward). Adella passed on July 7, 1888. John remarried to Martha Emma (née Cason); she passed on June 9, 1904. John died on June 21st, 1911 and is interred at Brundidge City Cemetery, Brundidge, Pike County, Alabama.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private Nathan Vendrick was born on ca. 1845 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at his father Wiley’s residence along with his mother Marinda and his younger brother John. His father was a farmer of no small means, who reported holding real estate in the value of $2,200, and a personal estate valued at $2,000. Both Nathan and his younger brother were educated, having attended school with 12 months of the census. Nathan and his brother enlisted on March 28, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; Nathan stated his age as 17. Nathan was reported present with the company from the date of his enlistment, until September 19, 1863 when he was killed in action at Chickamauga, Georgia. His place of interment is unknown.[3][4][5][14][15]
  • Private William H. Wade was born ca. 1838 at Lawrence County, Alabama. He enlisted April 5, 1861 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Gee’s Company (Company G, 1st Florida Infantry) for a period of 12 months, and was discharged on March 9, 1862 at Warrington,[61] Florida “by reason of inability to perform military duty.” He was described as 36 years old, 5 feet tall, dark complexion, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a farmer. He reenlisted[62] in Captain Davidson’s Company on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was present with the company when it left the state, but took ill on August 13 at Knoxville, Tennessee and was sent to a convalescent camp on August 31. He was reported being absent without leave at Chattanooga, Tennessee from November 12, 1862 through March 9, 1863. He had returned to the company by March 12, but was back in the hospital at Chattanooga on July 2. He returned to the company on July 9, 1863 and was present with it until February 21, 1864 when he was admitted to a hospital under Surgeon’s order. There is no recorded date of his return to the company; however, he is reported to be present with it when it surrendered at Durham Station, North Carolina on April 26, 1865. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. William applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. The date and place of his death are unknown, as is the place of interment.[3][4][5][14]
  • Private Lemuel J. Walden was born ca. 1832 at Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia. He married Lucretia A. (née Floyd) on January 9, 1853 at Liberty County, Florida. He enlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Davidson’s Company; he stated his age as 30. Lemuel was with the company when it departed the state until September 20, 1863. He was appointed 4th Corporal on August 1, 1862, and then to 5th Sergeant on June 5, 1863. He was wounded in the right arm and right hand at Chickamauga on September 19, 1863. He was hospitalized and then granted a 30-day furlough at Liberty County, Florida. He returned to the company at the end of the furlough, but was again hospitalized under Surgeon’s order on December 17, 1863 at Dalton, Georgia., and then again on February 21, 1864. On April 16, 1864, he was declared unfit for further field service and was detached for service at the Johnson (Receiving and Distributing) Hospital at Atlanta, Georgia for duty as a nurse. Lemuel surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled there on May 17, 1865. He was described as being 6’ tall, with light skin and hair, and blue eyes. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension. He died on November 7, 1899 and is interred at Carrabelle Cemetery (aka Evergreen Cemetery), Carrabelle, Franklin County, Florida.[3][4][5][14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • United States War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
  • Robertson, Fred L. (Compiler) (1903). Soldiers of Florida in the Seminole, Civil and Spanish–American Wars. Democrat Book and Job Print, Live Oak, Florida.
  • Hartman, David W. (1995). Biographical Rosters of Florida’s Confederate and Union Soldiers, 1861-1865: (Volume 2; 5th Florida Infantry – 8th Florida Infantry). Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. ISBN 1568372884.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 251: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • Sheppard, Jonathan C. (2012). By the Noble Daring of Her Sons: The Florida Brigade of the Army of Tennessee. University of Alabama Press. p. 319. ISBN 0817317074.
  • Scaif, James Verner (1919). Local Designations of Confederate Troops. Total 3974. Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 225: Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • National Archives and Records Service. Microcopy No. 653: 1860 Federal Population Census - Part 4.
  • Swart, Stanley L. "The Military Examination Board in the Civil War: A Case Study". Civil War History, Volume 16 Number 3, September 1970.
  • Florida Department of Military Affairs (1903). Florida Militia Muster Rolls Seminole Indian Wars; Special Archives Publication Number 74, Volume 8. George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida Digital Collection.
  • Kenan, Alvaretta (1967). The Kenan family and some allied families of the compiler and publisher. J. S Kenan II, Statesboro, Georgia.
  • Debow, J.B.D., editor (1857). Debow's Review: Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial Progress and Resources, Volume 22, -Third Series, Volume II. Washington City and New Orleans.
  • King, William L. (1872). The Newspaper Press of Charleston, S.C.: A Chronological and Biographical History, Embracing a Period of One Hundred and Forty Years. Edward Perry, (Bookpress) 149 Meeting Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Reports and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina Passed at the Annual Session of 1849. I. C. Morgan, State Printer; Columbia, South Carolina. 1849. p. 747.
  • Journal of the Proceedings of the Convention of the People of Florida: Begun and Held at the Capitol in the City of Tallahassee [sic], on Thursday, January 3, AD, Part 1861. Office of the Floridian and Journal, Tallahassee; Dyke and Carlisle. 1861. p. 124.
  • Biographical Cyclopedia of Representative Men of Maryland and the District of Columbia. National Biographical and Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 1879. p. 872.
  • Brice, Marshall M. (1967). The Stonewall Brigade Band. McClure Printing, Verona, Virginia. p. 213.
  • Seddon, James A. (1863). Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States, 1863. J. W Randolph, 121 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.
  • Goodnite, Jason. "Cooking on Campaign" (PDF). 26th North Carolina Regiment. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 258: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations Raised Directly by the Confederate Government. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • Webb, Wanton S. (1885). Webb’s Historical, Industrial and Biographical Florida, Part 1. W. S. Webb & Co., New York. p. 202.
  • Rubenstein, Major David A. "A Study of the Medical Support to the Union and Confederate Armies during the Battle of Chickamauga: Lessons and Implications for Today's U.S. Army Medical Department Leaders". Master’s Thesis presented to U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1990.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g United States War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.
  2. ^ Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 – Present
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy Robertson, Fred L. (Compiler) (1903). Soldiers of Florida in the Seminole, Civil and Spanish–American Wars. Democrat Book and Job Print, Live Oak, Florida.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm Hartman, David W. (1995). Biographical Rosters of Florida’s Confederate and Union Soldiers, 1861-1865: (Volume 2; 5th Florida Infantry – 8th Florida Infantry). Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. ISBN 1568372884.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 251: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Sheppard, Jonathan C. (2012). By the Noble Daring of Her Sons: The Florida Brigade of the Army of Tennessee. University of Alabama Press. p. 319. ISBN 0817317074.
  7. ^ Scaif, James Verner (1919). Local Designations of Confederate Troops. Total 3974. Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York.
  8. ^ General Evans, Clement A. (editor). Confederate Military History, Volume XI (Florida and Texas). Confederate Publishing Company, Atlanta, Georgia. (Pages 175-176)
  9. ^ The documents for all men of company A paroled at Durham would bear the same remark regarding the formation of Company D of the consolidated 1st Florida Infantry Regiment.
  10. ^ National Park Service, American Battlefield Protection Program
  11. ^ Encyclopedia Virginia
  12. ^ There were different types “Examining Boards”. In this particular case its purpose was likely to evaluate the qualifications and suitability for military service of certain company and field grade officers who were elected to the ranks, as well as a review of enlisted men who were to be promoted “sursum ab ordine”. It was also a method by which a commander could “cull his herd” of subordinate officers who he found “failed to measure up.” Examination Boards, both Federal and Confederate, were to consider “gross immorality, habitual drunkenness, keeping low company, shirking duty, undue familiarity with subordinates, or incapacity to govern men” as disqualifications for continued service. Many of those ordered to undergo examination resigned rather than face the ordeal and possible disgrace of a possible dismissal from service.
  13. ^ Swart, Stanley L. "The Military Examination Board in the Civil War: A Case Study". Civil War History, Volume 16 Number 3, September 1970.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 225: Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co National Archives and Records Service. Microcopy No. 653: 1860 Federal Population Census - Part 4.
  16. ^ Roll of Students of University of South Carolina College 1805–1905, Prof. Andrew Charles Moore, South Carolina College, Columbia, S. C.
  17. ^ Students of the University of Virginia, 1825-1874
  18. ^ Roots Web
  19. ^ Florida Department of Military Affairs (1903). Florida Militia Muster Rolls Seminole Indian Wars; Special Archives Publication Number 74, Volume 8. George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida Digital Collection.
  20. ^ The "1st Sergeant" in an American Civil War infantry company had two additional titles - "Orderly sergeant", and "Covering Sergeant." "1st Sergeant" pertains to his seniority in the company, "Orderly Sergeant" pertains to his administrative function, and "Covering Sergeant" pertains to his combat function. In the case of the latter, "The first sergeant in the rear rank, touching 'with the left elbow and covering the captain. In the manœuvres he will be denominated "covering sergeant", or right guide of the company. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)" and "A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer, Captain Thomas Wilhelm (1881)"
  21. ^ * Kenan, Alvaretta (1967). The Kenan family and some allied families of the compiler and publisher. J. S Kenan II, Statesboro, Georgia.
  22. ^ Unlike the "1st Sergeant", who was the senior non-commissioned officer in the company, Sergeants identified as "2nd", "3rd", "4th", or "5th" was not an indication of their respective seniority. The sergeants were file closers while the company was in line of battle; their "number" indicated their position and duties. The 2nd Sergeant was opposite the second file from the left of the company. In the manoeuvres he is called the Left Guide of the company. The 3rd Sergeant was opposite the second file from the right of the second platoon. The 4th Sergeant was opposite the second file from the left of the first platoon. The 5th Sergeant was opposite the second file from the right of the first platoon. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)" and "A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer, Captain Thomas Wilhelm (1881)"
  23. ^ Debow, J.B.D., editor (1857). Debow's Review: Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial Progress and Resources, Volume 22, -Third Series, Volume II. Washington City and New Orleans.
  24. ^ King, William L. (1872). The Newspaper Press of Charleston, S.C.: A Chronological and Biographical History, Embracing a Period of One Hundred and Forty Years. Edward Perry, (Bookpress) 149 Meeting Street, Charleston, S.C.
  25. ^ Reports and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina Passed at the Annual Session of 1849. I. C. Morgan, State Printer; Columbia, South Carolina. 1849. p. 747.
  26. ^ A civil officer or lay judge who administers the law, especially one who conducts a court that deals with minor offenses and holds preliminary hearings for more serious ones. Quizlet
  27. ^ Journal of the Proceedings of the Convention of the People of Florida: Begun and Held at the Capitol in the City of Tallahassee [sic], on Thursday, January 3, AD, Part 1861. Office of the Floridian and Journal, Tallahassee; Dyke and Carlisle. 1861. p. 124.
  28. ^ Corporals were numbered "1st", "2nd", "3rd", or "4th"; as was the case with Sergeants (except 1st Sergeant), this numbering was not an indication of their respective seniority. Unlike the sergeants, the corporals' number was a function of individual height, for "the corporals will be posted in the front rank, and on the right and left of platoons, according to height; the tallest corporal and the tallest [enlisted] man will form the first file, the second two tallest men will form the second file, and so on to the last file, which will be composed of shortest corporal and the shortest [enlisted] man. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)"
  29. ^ Heritage Parkway Photos
  30. ^ Biographical Cyclopedia of Representative Men of Maryland and the District of Columbia. National Biographical and Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 1879. p. 872.
  31. ^ During the Civil War, military leaders with the Union and the Confederacy relied on military musicians to entertain troops, position troops in battle, and stir them on to victory — some actually performing concerts in forward positions during the fighting. Musicians enjoyed no more privileges than the common soldier. Initially, the rank of "musician" in Northern armies was comparable to that of private and was viewed negatively by many. In the South, musicians were generally assigned a somewhat more valuable status and were paid twelve dollars a month, one dollar more than a private.
  32. ^ About Army Bands
  33. ^ In addition to the long hours of musical responsibilities, band members bore many other duties. If they were not directly involved in the fighting, and many were, they were invaluable in guarding equipment and prisoners. Many times they assisted in cooking, for both the troops and the wounded. They were also employed as physical laborers setting up field hospitals, collecting wood, and digging trenches; most were assigned to the medical staff, either as an assistant, a stretcher-bearer, or an orderly. Given the horrific casualties suffered by Confederate forces at the Battle of Chickamauga on September 18th – 20th, it is possible that Alexander was sent to the hospital as medical support.
  34. ^ Brice, Marshall M. (1967). The Stonewall Brigade Band. McClure Printing, Verona, Virginia. p. 213.
  35. ^ A guard detail was posted for a period of 24 hours and then relieved. Each detail consisted of three reliefs; each relief contained a sufficient number of men to occupy each post. Each man was “on post” for a period of two hours and relieved for a period of four hours before going back “on post”.
  36. ^ a b c Seddon, James A. (1863). Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States, 1863. J. W Randolph, 121 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.
  37. ^ Both armies attempted collective cooking on a company level by assigning two men per company as a company cook. This system, however, never really caught on and by and large soldiers prepared their food in “messes” of 4-10 men. This system allowed men to collectively prepare food, using combined cooking supplies and rations. These “messes” quickly became something more than a cooking party; they became a social unit through which soldiers shared food, clothing, shelter and camaraderie. Such bonds of love and friendship sustained these soldiers through four years of blood and hardship just as much as the hardtack and coffee in their haversacks.
  38. ^ Goodnite, Jason. "Cooking on Campaign" (PDF). 26th North Carolina Regiment. Retrieved 4 August 2016.
  39. ^ Official Records, Volume 30 (Part II), Chapter XLII, pps. 533, 537
  40. ^ National Park Service, Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery Columbus, Ohio
  41. ^ "The information contained in "“BIOGRAPHICAL ROSTERS OF FLORIDA'S CONFEDERATE AND UNION SOLDIERS, 1861-1865: (VOLUME 2; 5TH FLORIDA INFANTRY – 8TH FLORIDA INFANTRY”)”. David W. Hartman, David Coles (Compilers), 1995, Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. Page 582" is incorrect regarding the birth date, marriage, date and place of death. The information stated is in fact for "George W. Crawford", a member of the 5th Tennessee Infantry Regiment who did not arrive in Florida until ca. 1872-3 from Tennessee, and became a person of some prominence in Orange County, near what is present day Conway.
  42. ^ The American Civil War, "Point Lookout Prisoner of War Camp"
  43. ^ In a letter dated September 18th, 1899, Lieutenant Black vouched for Simeon’s service when Simeon applied for a Confederate Pension, stating the Simeon enlisted on April 1st, 1864, and that he, “took part in the battles of Resaca, Jonesboro, Dallas, and “Devil’s Elbow” or Chethams bend [Kennesaw Mountain].”
  44. ^ Anna Kirkland (née Kennedy) was previously married to Seth Kirkland, who served in the same company along with his brother William and brother-in-law Thomas Kennedy. Seth was mortally wounded on October 16th, 1862 when a gun was accidentally fired at Big Hill, Kentucky. He died of gangrene on December 8th, 1862 at Richmond, Kentucky and was buried in a local cemetery.
  45. ^ At this time in military history, anyone assigned to an artillery battery that had a specialized job, ie: blacksmith, farrier, leatherworker, etc., was considered an “artificer”. As an experienced harness maker before the war, in it is not unlikely that William’s skills in that capacity may have been more valuable than as a rifleman. See “INSTRUCTION FOR FIELD ARTILLERY”. French, Barry & Hunt (Board of Artillery Officers), 1861, J. B. Lippencott & Co., Philadelphia. (Part I, Article I, pg. 4)
  46. ^ National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 258: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations Raised Directly by the Confederate Government. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  47. ^ An anal fistula (also commonly called fistula-in-ano) is frequently the result of a previous or current anal abscess. See American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons, Michael Buckmire, MD, FACS, FASCRS, https://www.fascrs.org/patients/disease-condition/abscess-and-fistula-expanded-information
  48. ^ “Scrofula” is a tuberculosis infection of the lymph nodes in the neck. See NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine, https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001354.htm, accessed 2016-05-22.
  49. ^ “Debilitas" (Latin) or debility were diagnostic terms used by Civil War surgeons, especially Confederates, to describe general, severe, disabling weakness in patients. Some doctors also used the terms cachexia for such weakness. Both Union and Confederate forms for listing the number of patients with each type of diagnosis included debility in the category "all other diseases". See Schroeder-Lein, Glenna R. (2015). The Encyclopedia of Civil War Medicine. Routledge, 711 Third Avenue, New York, NY. p. 457. ISBN 0765621304.
  50. ^ The Provost Guard in Civil War armies was roughly equivalent to today’s Military Police. Unlike the United States Army, the Confederacy did not create a separate provost department; instead, it assigned officers, enlisted men, and on occasion entire military units to police duties for limited periods of time. Veteran or disabled soldiers frequently served as a "provost guard". (See “Rebel Watchdog: The Confederate States Army Provost Guard. By Kenneth Radley. (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.), and “The Military Staff: Roles to Maintain the Armies of the Civil War”; Civil War Trust, http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/warfare-and-logistics/the-staff.html, accessed 2016-09-24)
  51. ^ During the Tullahoma Campaign, the Bethpage Bridge at Allisonia represented a key crossing of the Elk River by the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, and was the site of a skirmish by Union and Confederate troops on July 2nd. Bragg decided to abandon Tullahoma, in part, because the swollen Elk at his back might trap him. He retreated to the Cowan area. Lieutenant General Leonidas Polk’s Corps defended the crossing area until ordered to withdraw to begin the evacuation across the Cumberland Plateau. (See Tullahoma Campaign – Communities – Estill Springs/Allisonia/Decherd, http://mtweb.mtsu.edu/tullproj/Communities/estill_springs.html, accessed 2016-05-22)
  52. ^ Both Union and Confederate hospitals employed ward masters. These men, one per ward, were under the supervision of the hospital steward. Ward masters had two main duties; accounting for and safeguarding of patients’ belongings; and to receive, maintain, account for, and replace all hospital furniture, bedding, and cooking utensils for his ward. Confederate ward masters also were responsible for ward cleanliness, and supervision of ward nurses. See Schroeder-Lein, Glenna R. (2015). The Encyclopedia of Civil War Medicine. Taylor & Francis. 2015. p. 457. ISBN 9781317457091
  53. ^ Acting Commissary of Subsistence, or "A.C.S.", was an officer whose business was to provide food for a body of troops or a military post. While technically a general staff officer, the ACS at this time was a line officer with the rank of Captain or Major.
  54. ^ Private Hair was over the age of 35 when he enlisted in Davidson’s Company, which had yet to be taken into Confederate service; there is no documentation to suggest that he possessed any other disqualification from Confederate service. For a complete list of requirements (and disqualifiers) for Confederate military service, refer to CS Army Regulations 1863, see Article XLVI, “Recruiting Service.”, Sections 1399. & 1406.
  55. ^ Eastern Illinois University, accessed 2015-11-21
  56. ^ Under the “Women’s Law”, married women allowed to own (but not control) property in their own name. Florida's statute, probably resulting from Florida’s Spanish civil law heritage, appears to have been the result of a desire to protect marriage arrangements made under civil law before the territory became a state in 1845. See W. Cord, “A Treatise on the Legal and Equitable Rights of Married Women 719 (1861); E. Warbasse, supra note 2, at 77, 163.”
  57. ^ This company ultimately became Company A, 10th Florida Infantry Regiment on June 8th, 1864. This organization was also known as the 1st Special Battalion Florida Infantry. (See "National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Microfilm Publication M251: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. – Reel M251, Roll 73, Images 1600 – 1614)
  58. ^ Private Renew was over the age of 35 when he enlisted in Davidson’s Company, which had yet to be taken into Confederate service; there is no documentation to suggest that he possessed any other disqualification from Confederate service. For a complete list of requirements (and disqualifiers) for Confederate military service, refer to CS Army Regulations 1863, see Article XLVI, “Recruiting Service.”, Sections 1399. & 1406.
  59. ^ “Several divisions chose to establish division-level hospitals. Three separate accounts identify the fact that William Preston's Division had such a hospital. Both Robert Bullock, of Robert Trigg's Brigade, and John Palmer, of John Kelly's, reported the division hospital as being behind or near their positions to the south of Snodgrass Hill. To the southeast of these units, below the hill, was a draw that opened on the Dyer Field. When John Wilson of Trigg's Brigade was borne off the battlefield he was taken to a 'farmhouse in [the] valley temporarily converted to a hospital. The facts, though incomplete, place Preston's division hospital at the Dyer Farm.” See “A Study of the Medical Support to the Union and Confederate Armies during the Battle of Chickamauga: Lessons and Implications for Today's U.S. Army Medical Department Leaders”, Major David A. Rubenstein. 1990.
  60. ^ According to the 1860 census, John was born ca. 1848, making him 14 years old at the time of enlistment. His brother Nathan was recorded as being born ca. 1845 and reported his age as 17.
  61. ^ Warrington is 6 miles west of Pensacola; Company G (old) 1st Florida Infantry was stationed at Camp Magnolia, which was north of the east-end of Grande Lagoon and west of Fort Barrancas.
  62. ^ His “inability to perform military duty” would appear to have experienced a remarkable reversal in the three days between his discharge and reenlistment.

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