Company B, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Company B, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment
6th FL ANV Pattern (reproduction).jpg
Regimental Colors (from c. March/April 1864 to December 16th, 1864)
ActiveMarch 12, 1862 – April 26, 1865
Allegiance Confederate Florida
 Confederate States of America
Branch Confederate States Army
TypeCompany
RoleInfantry
Size109 aggregate (April, 1862)
Part ofDepartment of East Tennessee
Confederate Army of Kentucky
Army of Tennessee
Nickname(s)Love's Company; Gadsden Greys
Equipment.577 Pattern 1853 Enfield
.69 Springfield Model 1842
EngagementsAmerican Civil War
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Captain Samuel Bryant Love: March 12, 1862 - February 19, 1863

Company B, 6th Florida Infantry Regiment was a military company of the Confederate States of America during the U.S. Civil War. On February 2, 1862, the Confederate War Department issued a call for troops. Florida, under this newly imposed quota, would furnish two regiments and a battalion to fight for the duration of the war. The troops rendezvoused at preselected locations and there "be clothed, supplied, and armed at the expense of the Confederate States." Each enlistee received a $50 bounty for volunteering.[1]

Organization[edit]

Samuel Bryant Love represented Gadsden County in the Florida House of Representatives in 1860, and was elected by unanimous vote as Speaker of Florida's House of Representatives in 1861. He left the position early in 1862 to raise a company of infantry from his home county.

Love's recruiting efforts began the first week of March, 1862 at Quincy in Gadsden County, Florida, with the majority of enlistments being accomplished by the third week of March.[2][3][4]

Modified image of Map of the Tri-State Area-Florida, Georgia and Alabama (ca. 1865) showing locations of Chattahoochee Arsenal, Quincy, and Rico's Bluff. (Image credit: State Archives of Florida)

Concurrently, the coastal artillery batteries located at Apalachicola were being moved farther inland in response to exchanges between Secretary of War Judah P. Benjamin, General Robert E. Lee, Governor John Milton, and Brigadier General James H. Trapier, commanding the Department of East and Middle Florida. On March 19, 1862, General Trapier reported that the original plan to establish a battery at Fort Gadsden had been overcome by events, and been landed further up the Apalachicola River at Rico’s Bluff, some 40 miles (64 kilometers) south of Chattahoochee on the east bank of the Apalachicola River.

By order of Brigadier General Trapier, Love's Company along with the company of Captain R. H. M. Davidson (later Company A, 6th Florida Infantry) arrived at Rico's Bluff about March 20 to reinforce and support the newly erected batteries; these two companies would remain at Rico's Bluff until the regiment left the state.[1][5]

On April 10, 1862, Governor Milton informed Secretary of War George W. Randolph that the requisition for "two regiments and a half of infantry...would by the 15th instant be fully organized and subject to your orders, and companies enough have volunteered for service for three years or the war to compose three full regiments of infantry. ... to serve during the war and wherever their services may be necessary...the Sixth Regiment, at the Mount Vernon Arsenal on the Chattahoochie, will be organized on the 14th instant."[1]

About April 15, elections of field and staff officers for the 6th Florida Regiment were held, with Captain Jesse J. Finley of Company D elected to Colonel, Captain Alexander D. McLean of Company H elected to Lieutenant Colonel, and 1st Sergeant Daniel Lafayette Kenan of Company A elected to Major. The commissions became official on April 18; with the election of field officers concluded, the 8 companies at Mount Vernon Arsenal at Chattahoochee and the 2 companies at Rico's Bluff would be formally organized as the 6th Regiment of Florida Infantry.[5][6] "Love's Company" was officially designated Company B; the men of Company BA would bestow upon themselves the unofficial sobriquet of "Gadsden Greys".[7]

On April 23, 1862, Florida Adjutant and Inspector General William H. Milton informed Governor Milton that: "The following companies compose the Sixth Regiment, eight companies of which are at the Mount Vernon Arsenal and two at Rico's Bluff; Magnolia State Guards, Capt. L. M. Attaway; Campbellton Greys, Capt. H. B. Grace; Jackson County Volunteers, Lieut. John B. Hayes; Jackson County Company, Capt. H. O. Bassset; Union Rebels, Capt. A. D. McLean; Choctawhatchie Volunteers, H. K. Hagan; Florida Guards, R. H. M. Davidson; Gadsden Greys, Capt. Samuel B. Love; Gulf State Infantry, Capt. James C. Evans; Washington County Company, Capt. A. McMillan, of which regiment J. J. Finley is colonel, A. D. McLean lieutenant-colonel, and D. L. Kenan major."[1]

Colonel Finley was somewhat less enthusiastic concerning the organization of the 6th Florida than were Governor Milton and his Inspector General; he noted in his Regimental Return for April that, “...the names of absent officers for that month, the no. and date of order, the reasons for and commencement of absence and period assigned for the same were not reported by the companies of the Regiment. It was not until about the 20th April when or about that time the field officers were commissioned that any company report were made note. Captain Love's and Captain Davdison's Companies were stationed at Rico's Bluff on the Apalachicola River about the 20th of March last by order of General Napier the commanding the Military Department of East and Middle Florida with the consent of the Governor... I have been compelled to make up the monthly regimental report from the morning report of companies on the 30th day of April.”

His accountability issue with personnel would continue into May; he noted on his Regimental Return for that month, “Owing to the amt of sickness at this Post and the number of men on sick furlough the names of the absentees cannot be given in this Return. The Returns of Captains Evans, Love, and Davidson's companies have been erroneously included in the Monthly Return of the 6th Florida Battalion commanded by Lieutenant Colonel Chas. [Charles] F. Hopkins.”[5]

Active Service[edit]

6th Florida Infantry Regimental Colors - Hardee Pattern (ca Late Summer 1862 - March/April 1864) with "Chickamauga" battle honor

The 6th Florida Infantry Regiment departed the Mount Vernon Arsenal at Chattahoochee, Florida on June 13, 1862. It would serve from June through August 1862 in the Army of East Tennessee commanded by Major General Edmund Kirby Smith. The Army of East Tennessee was redesignated as the Confederate Army of Kentucky on August 25, 1862, when General Smith led it into eastern Kentucky during the Confederate Heartland Offensive. On November 20, 1862, the Army of Mississippi, General Braxton Bragg commanding, and the Army of Kentucky, General E. Kirby Smith commanding, became the Army of Tennessee. General Bragg assumed command, and General Smith was reassigned to the Department of East Tennessee. The 6th Florida would remain assigned to the Army of Tennessee for the remainder of the war (under General Braxton Bragg through December 27, 1863; under General Joseph E. Johnston from December 27, 1863 to July 18, 1864; under General John B. Hood from July 18, 1864 through January 23, 1865; under Major General Richard Taylor from January 23 to February 23, 1865: and again under General Joseph E. Johnston from February 23 to April 26, 1865).[1][6][8]

Surrender[edit]

Bennett Place - Farm home of James Bennett, where Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston surrendered his army to Union General William T. Sherman, Apr. 26, 1865. Johnston's surrender followed Lee's at Appomattox by 17 days and ended the Civil War in the Carolinas, Georgia, and Florida (Image credit: Library of Congress)

From April 8 to the 10, General Johnston reorganized the army, consolidating dozens of shrunken regiments and brigades. Containing fewer soldiers than an understrength battalion, the remnants of the Florida Brigade were united to form the 1st Florida Infantry Regiment, Consolidated - 1st Florida Infantry & 3rd Florida Infantry (consolidated) (Capt. A. B. McLeod); 1st Florida Cavalry (dismounted) and 4th Florida Infantry (consolidated) (Capt. George B. Langford); 6th Florida Infantry (Lieut. Malcolm Nicholson); 7th Florida Infantry (Capt. Robert B. Smith). Company B of the original 6th Florida Infantry, along with companies A, C, and D, would be consolidated to form Company D of the 1st Consolidated Regiment of Florida Infantry.[1][5][9]


On April 18, General Joseph E. Johnston signed an armistice with General William T. Sherman at Bennett's Place near Durham, and on April 26, formally surrendered his army. Of the 119 men who mustered into Confederate service with Company B, only ten were present. On May 1, 1865, five days after General Johnston surrendered the force under his command, the troops of the 1st Florida Infantry, Consolidated, were paroled.[6][10][11]

Roster[edit]

Officers[edit]

Captain S. B. Love's resignation letter. (Image credit: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA))

Captain Samuel Bryant Love was born ca. 1823 in Georgia. He was mayor of Quincy, Gadsden County Florida from 1858 to 1859. In 1860, he was living with his wife Matilda [née Bradwell] at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a lawyer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $10,000, and a personal worth of $8,000. He represented Gadsden County in the Florida House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1860 and 1861; in 1861, he was unanimously elected Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives thanks to the nomination of William D. Bloxham. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed to the rank of Captain. His company, along with R.H.M. Davidson’s company, was assigned to support a battery of artillery overlooking the Apalachicola River at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. His company would be absent on duty at Rico’s Bluff when the 6th Regiment was mustered into Confederate service at Chattahoochee in mid-April. Captain Love was present with his company when it left the state, and remained with them until January 23, 1863, when he was granted a furlough. He tendered his resignation between January 23 and February 19, 1863: his reason being in part that, stating in part that, “being Executor of a large estate in Gadsden County Florida consisting of upward of two hundred negros and the plantation on which said negros are…from an honest conviction that I can better serve the interests of the Confederacy as well as individual interest in civil life than in the capacity in which I am now acting.” Secretary of War James A. Seddon accepted Captain Love’s resignation on February 19, 1863. He was relieved on that date by 2nd Lieutenant Raburn H. Reeves. He is reported to have become a Colonel of militia in Florida prior to the war’s end; he was again elected as Mayor of Quincy, serving from 1864 to 1868. He continued to practice law, served as member of the Gadsden County school board from 1871 to 1873, and was a deacon of the Quincy Presbyterian Church. Captain Love died on January 1, 1881; the locations of his death and interment are unknown.

1st Lieutenant William H. Scott was born December 30, 1826 in South Carolina. He married Martha [née Chandler] on October 2, 1850. In 1860, William, Martha and four children were living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. William was a lawyer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $15,000, and a personal worth of $21,000. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida and appointed to the rank of 1st Lieutenant. At the time of his enlistment, he was reported absent on duty (most likely at Rico’s Bluff). Lieutenant Scott was present with his company when it left the state, and remained with them until October 29, 1862, when he was reported sick at Knoxville, Tennessee. He tendered his resignation on that date at Blain's Crossroads, Tennessee due to ill health. The regimental surgeon, J. T. Holden, endorsed Scott’s request, stating that, “…since April last, nearly the whole time he has been unfit for service and still continues to convalesce.”[1] Lieutenant Scott resigned his commission due to health on November 12, 1862 and was relieved by 2nd Lieutenant Raburn H. Reeves. Lieutenant Scott survived the war, passing away at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida on June 29, 1886, and is interred at Eastern Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Martha applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension in 1907 for William's service.

2nd Lieutenant Raburn H. Reeves (also "Rabun H. Reeves") was born ca. 1842 in Georgia. In 1860, he was medical student, living with his father, mother, and a younger sister at Concord, Gadsden County, Florida. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant in November, 1862, subsequent to the resignation of 1st Lieutenant William H. Scott. 1st Lieutenant Reeves served on detached duty of Officer of Police at Knoxville, Tennessee, on December 19, 1862 until February 19, 1863. On that date, he was promoted to Captain, and relieved Captain Love, who had resigned his commission. He was listed as being in a hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee from August 9, 1863 through December 1863; he was sent to a hospital at Montgomery Springs, Virginia, and subsequently requested a transfer to Columbus, Georgia on December 10, 1863. He was reported absent without leave on February 26, 1864, and dropped from the roll on June 2, 1864. He is known to have survived the war, surrendering at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865. He was paroled from there on June 16, 1865. He was described as 6 feet tall, auburn hair, blue eyes, and light complexion. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Junior 2nd Lieutenant Donald Nicholson (also "Donald W. Nichelson", "Donald Nicholson") was born ca. 1824 in South Carolina. He is the cousin of 3rd Sergeant Malcolm Nicholson and Private Angus Nicholson. In 1860, he was living with his wife Sarah and three children at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $3,000, and a personal worth of $12,000. He was enlisted into Confederate service on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He tendered his resignation on July 10, 1862 at Camp Kirby Smith, Knoxville, Tennessee due to frequent debility resulting from a recurrence of a pre-existing liver disease. On July 20, the regimental surgeon, J. T. Holden, endorsed his request, stating that, “I further declare my belief that he will not be able to resume his duties…very uncertain whether he will ever be able to undergo the fatigue and exposure of camp.” The request was approved by Colonel J. J. Finley, Commanding the 6th Florida Regiment. He enlisted with Company D, Florida 5th Cavalry Battalion, as a 2nd Lieutenant on August 24, 1863 at Quincy, Florida. He is recorded as absent without leave on the last roll, and was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 15, 1865. At that time, he was described as 5 feet 7.5 inches tall, dark eyes, skin and hair. Lieutenant Reeves died on January 24, 1889, and is interred at the Ferrell Cemetery in Gadsden County, Florida. Sarah applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension in 1901 for Donald's service.

Non-commissioned Officers[edit]

Tentatively identified as Theophilus S. Luckie, Company B, 6th Florida Infantry. (Image Credit: U.S. Army Military History Institute/Jim Enos)

1st Sergeant[12] Theophilus Sterling Luckie was born August 27, 1829 at Covington, Newton County, Georgia. He married Lucie Lola (née Benton) on October 11, 1855 in Georgia. Together they had one child, a daughter, named Lula Lucy, who was born in Florida on October 12, 1859. He enlisted March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Samuel B. Love’s Company (Company B, 6th Florida Infantry) by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age at enlistment was stated as 32 years. He served as 1st Sergeant from the time of his enlistment until March 18, 1863, when he was promoted to Jr. 2nd Lieutenant by election, as a result of vacancy created by promotion of T. N. Henley to Senior 2nd Lieutenant on February 4, 1863. Theophilus received 23 votes; Nixon Elliot (then a Corporal) received 10. M. Nicholson, T. N. Henley, and Corp Wamack inspected the votes, and the results declared official by the regimental adjutant, Lieutenant Frank Phelps. Theophilus was present with the company from the time of his promotion until his capture at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. He was sent to Louisville, Kentucky on December 18, 1864, and arriving there the following day. He was transferred from Louisville on December 20 to Johnson's Island, arriving at the Depot Prisoners of War, near Sandusky, Ohio on December 22, 1864. He was released from Johnson’s Island, Ohio on oath June 16, 1865. He was described as 6’ 1” tall, dark hair and eyes, florid complexion, place of residence as Atlanta, Georgia, and 36 years old. He was reported to be living at Marianna, Jackson County, Florida in 1870. Lieutenant Luckie died on February 17, 1902 at Tucker, Dekalb County, Georgia, and is interred at the Crossroads Methodist Church Cemetery.

"U.S. Military Prison on Johnson's Island Ohio." The original drawing was done by Lieutenant G. W. Melvin, Company C of the 9th Louisiana Infantry, C.S.A. March 10, 1865. (Image Credit: Alabama Dept. of Archives and History, 624 Washington Ave., Montgomery, AL 36130)

3rd Sergeant[13] David Gee was born ca. 1837 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at the residence of his widowed mother, Martha, a very well-to-do person reporting a real estate value of some $25,000, and a personal estate valued at $75, 000. Others living there were David’s wife Martha (née Austin), his older sister, and two younger brothers. David reported his profession as “farming”. He enlisted June 13, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Promoted from ranks to 3rd Sergeant on September 15, 1862. He was reported as absent on a sick furlough from January 22 to March 13, 1863. Special Orders # 62, dated Tullahoma, Tennessee on April 13, 1863 by General Joseph E. Johnson, transferred him as a result of being promoted to Lieutenant, to the Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, to report to General P. G. T. Beauregard. A pay voucher dated April 16, 1863, and occasioned by his discharge as a result of transfer, describes him as being born in Gadsden County Florida, age 26 years, 5 feet 7 inches tall, florid complexion, grey eyes, auburn hair, and by trade a farmer. Muster roll dated July 22, 1863 document him as a 2nd Lieutenant with Captain Claire’s Company of Florida Infantry.

5th Sergeant Thomas N. Hendley (also Thomas N. Henly, Thomas N. Henley) was born July 28, 1830 in Georgia. He married Elizabeth J. (née Darcy) ca. February 5, 1857 at Decatur County, Georgia. In 1860, he and Elizabeth were living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida. Thomas gave his profession as an M.D., Reformed, and reported a personal estate valued at $1,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 31 years. He was reported absent on detached service until April 30, 1862, but was present with the company when if left Florida on June 13. He was left sick at Dix River, Kentucky, on October 3, 1862. He was returned to the ranks for unspecified reason subsequent to his return to the company, but was promoted to Junior 2nd Lieutenant on February 4, 1863. He remained present with the company until he was wounded in combat at Chickamauga, Georgia, on September 20, 1863. He was hospitalized for almost a month, and returned to the company sometime after October 28, 1863. He was present with the company from that time until his capture at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. He was sent to Louisville, Kentucky on December 18, 1864, and arriving there the following day. He was transferred from Louisville on December 20 to Johnson’s Island, arriving at the Depot Prisoners of War, near Sandusky, Ohio on December 22, 1864. He was released from Johnson’s Island, Ohio on oath June 16, 1865. He was described as 6’ tall, dark hair, blue eyes, light complexion, place of residence as Concord, Florida, and 34 years old. Lieutenant Hendley died on October 29, 1881 at Griffin, Spaulding County Georgia, and is interred at the Henley-Heflin Cemetery. Elizbeth returned to Concord, Florida ca. 1895; applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for Thomas’ service.

4th Sergeant Sherrod McCall was born ca. 1832 in Florida. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $400, and a personal worth of $2,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 30 years. He was present with the company until early February, 1863 when he was discharged. He reenlisted January 29, 1864 with Captain Dyke’s Company of the Florida Light Artillery at Madison, Madison County, Florida. He was documented as being absent without leave for the period 17–24 December 1864. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 16, 1865. At that time, he was described as 5 feet 7 inches tall, blue eyes, light hair and complexion. In 1888, he was one of three trustees for Gadsden County Public School #40 (Hinson’s). The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

3rd Sergeant Malcom Monroe Nicholson, Jr. (also Malcom Nichelson, Malcom Nicholson) was born in Florida on November 15, 1837. He is the brother of Private Angus Nicholson, and cousin of Junior 2nd Lieutenant Donald Angus Nicholson). In 1860, he was living with his brother’s family near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a doctor (M.D.) by profession, owning real estate in the value of $10,000, and a personal worth of $10,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 25 years. During the period from March 12 to April 30, 1862, he was on detached duty, likely at Rico’s Bluff. He was present with the company for the period June 30, 1862 through October 9, 1863. During this period, he was promoted from the ranks by election to Junior 2nd Lieutenant on August 11, 1862 replacing Junior 2nd Lieutenant Donald Nicholson who had resigned due to health issues the preceding month. He also appears to have had “de facto” command of Company B from the date of his promotion until April 30, 1863, when Captain Rabun H. Reeves returned from detached service at Knoxville, Tennessee. 2nd Lieutenant Nicholson was promoted to 1st Lieutenant prior to Captain Reeves’ return to the company. Excepting a stint as “Officer of the Guard” at Knoxville on August 19, 1863, Lieutenant Nicholson was present with the company until he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia on October 19, 1863. In February, 1864, he was reported as having been a patient at St. Mary’s Hospital for three months as a result of chronic dysentery with attendant emaciation and debility, and had been recommended for a leave of absence effective December 8, 1863. He remained absent from the rolls through at least September 18, 1864; however, he was report present with what remained of the Company when it surrendered on April 26, 1865 at Durham, North Carolina. He was reported as commanding Company D, 1st Consolidated Regiment of Florida Infantry(*) with the rank of Captain. After the war, Captain Nicholson relocated to Attapulgus, Georgia, and resumed the practice of medicine. He married Mary Virginia “Jennie” (née Smith) on October 24, 1867. Doctor Nicholson died on April 16, 1907 at Attapulgus, Decatur County, Georgia, and is interred in the Attapulgus Methodist Church Cemetery. Sometime after his death, “Jennie” returned to Florida. She applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for Captain Nicholson’s service.

2nd Sergeant Andrew Joseph Smith was born in Florida on February 14, 1830. He married Francis “Fannie” (née Everitt) on December 22, 1852 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he, “Fannie”, and 3-year old son William were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $3,500, and a personal worth of $10,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years; he stated his age as 32 years. He was discharged on the same day after providing a substitute, Rueben Curbo. Andrew Smith died on August 9, 1855 at Gadsden County, Florida, and is interred at the Owens Cemetery, Dogtown, Gadsden County, Florida. “Fannie” applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for her husband’s service in 1909; however, the pension was overturned in November 1913, after it was discovered that she was not eligible due to her husband having provided a substitute on the same day of his enlistment.

3rd Corporal[14] Joseph Cunningham Chandler (also Joseph Chandler, J. C. Chandler, Joseph C. Chandler) was born at Williamsburg County, South Carolina on July 29, 1835. He married Sarah D. (née Averitt) in 1854 in Georgia. In 1860, he, Sarah, and sons Frierson (age 4) and Joseph (age 3) were living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $2,500, and a personal worth of $5,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 27 years. During the period from March 12 to April 30, 1862, he was on detached duty, likely at Rico’s Bluff. Surgeon’s Certificate states that he is due pay from August 31, 1862 to February 13, 1863 due to being a patient at a hospital at Tallahassee, Florida. He was admitted for chronic diarrhea and a tumor growing on his neck. He is described as being born in Williamsburg Dist[rict] of South Carolina, age 27 years, 6’ tall, light complexion, blue eyes, auburn hair and by occupation a farmer. He is documented as being a 5th Sergeant in mid-1863, and was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia on November 25, 1863. He appears as a 4th Sergeant early in 1864. He last appears as being admitted to C.S.A. General Hospital No. 3 at Greensboro, North Carolina in March, 1865. He is documented as a Sergeant. After the war, Joseph relocated to Early County, Georgia. Sarah died September 8, 1885, at the age of 48. He applied for and was awarded a Georgia Confederate Pension for his service in 1898; he remarried in 1899 to Eliza J. (née Mercier). Joseph died on May 27, 1911 at Blakely, Early County, Georgia, and is interred at Enterprise Free Will Baptist Church Cemetery in Early County, Georgia.

2nd Corporal Iredell Alexander Hall (also Inadell Hall, Iradell Hall, Iredoll Hall) was born at Thomas County, Georgia on July 18, 1832. He married Narcissa (née Hendry) on August 14, 1858 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he, Narcissa, and a 7-year old female child (Florence Johnson) were living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida. He was laborer by profession, with a personal worth of $300. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 28 years. He was documented absent on sick furlough from March 12 through April 30 of 1862, but was with the company when it left Florida. He was admitted to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on September 30, 1862, but returned to duty before November 12. He was again absent on sick furlough from March 5 through March 13, 1863. He was reduced in rank from Corporal to Private between March 13 and April 30, 1863; remarks regarding the reason for reduction are illegible. He was present with the company from March 13 through September 20, 1863, when he was sent to a field hospital; this date coincides with 3rd day of the Battle of Chickamauga. He returned to the company prior to November 1, and was with it through February, 1864. There is no further report of him until surrendering at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865. He was paroled from there on June 16, 1865. He was described as 6 feet tall, dark hair, blue eyes, and fair complexion. Narcissa died on September 2, 1879. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension his service in 1902; however, the state revoked his pension on November 1, 1905, as a result of an anonymous letter (signed, “A. Tax payer”) reporting that he had assets exceeding the threshold for the award of a pension. Iredell died on December 12, 1906 at Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, and is interred at Barber Cemetery in Gadsden County, Florida.

1st Corporal James M. Rogers was born ca. 1827. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 35 years. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until October 3, 1863 when he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia. He was promoted by appointment to 3rd Sergeant on April 6, 1863. He last appears on a company muster roll dated January–February 1864, and as being present. Whether he survived the war, as well as the date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

4th Corporal Samuel Brantley Timmons (also Samuel B. Timmon, S. B. Timmons, Samuel B. Timmons) was born in at Marion, South Carolina ca. 1831. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with his wife Elizabeth and three children. He was farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $2,500, and a personal worth of $3,000. In addition to his own family, he provided shelter to eight ladies of the Long family, ranging in age from 28 years to 9 years. Samuel enlisted for state service on September 4, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry, and was appointed 3rd Lieutenant. Timmons reenlisted on March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 30 years. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until his death from unspecified cause in August 1862 near Knoxville, Tennessee. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Musician[15] George Henry Chester was born November 23, 1845 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at the home of his father, Abner, along with mother, 2 older brothers, a younger sister and 3 younger brothers. His father was rather well off; a farmer by profession, he owned real estate valued at $2,000, and a personal estate of some $3,000. George and his younger siblings were all enrolled in school at the time of the census. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years as a musician. His age was given as 16 years. He was documented absent on sick furlough from March 12 through April 30 of 1862, but was with the company when it left Florida. He was admitted to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee in October, 1862; he was placed on a medical furlough and was reported absent sick in Florida during the period November 12, 1862 through February 10th, 1863. He was discharged from Company B on March 23, 1863, due to his age. He enlisted in Company D, 5th Battalion Cavalry Regiment Florida on November 26, 1864. His military service ended ca. May 18, 1865 at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida. He was described as 5’ &’ tall, black hair, blue eyes, and dark skin. He married Melissa A. (née Johnson) on January 21, 1869 at Decatur County, Georgia. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension his service in 1907. George died on July 15, 1915 at Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, and is interred at Concord Cemetery in Gadsden County, Florida.

Musician James Harrison was born ca. 1830 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with his wife Martha and 4 children. He was farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $400, and a personal worth of $300. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 31 years. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until October 31, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was reported to have died there on November 30 (there is a conflicting report that gives his date of death as December 7). He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Musician Thomas J. Harrison was born ca. 1837 at Decatur County, Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with Ad Nelson, a 25-year old carpenter, and Nancy Callahan, a 64-year old housekeeper, both also from Georgia. Thomas was a carpenter by profession, with a personal worth of $200. He enlisted May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough for an unknown period between May 3 and June 30; however, he was with the company when it left the state, and remained with it until December 21, 1862, when he was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate at Knoxville, Tennessee, for double inguinal hernia.[16] At the time of his discharge, he was described as aged 25 years, five feet five & ½ inches high, blue eyes, dark hair, and by occupation a farrier. Whether he survived the war, as well as the date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Enlisted Men[edit]

Private James T. Bostwick (also James T. Bostick) was born ca. 1830 in South Carolina. In 1860, he was living near China Hill, Gadsden County, Florida, with wife Susanna and three children. He was farmer by profession, owning real estate in the value of $400, and a personal worth of $300. He enlisted May 11, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from date of enlistment until October 29, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was reported to have died of unspecified disease at a hospital at Greenville, Tennessee on December 18, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private William L. Bostwick (also William Bustick, William Bostwick, William L. Bostick) was born ca. 1832. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 30 years. He was present with the company from date of enlistment until February 18, 1863, when he was place on furlough due to sickness. He returned to the company before March 13; he was promoted to 5th Sergeant on April 16, 1863. He remained with the company until August 8, 1863, when he was transferred to the Engineer Corps.

Private Lott Creed Boykin (also L. C. Boykin) was born ca. 1813 in North Carolina. In 1860, he was living near Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida with wife Pheraby Boykin and four children. He was laborer by profession, with a declared personal worth of $300. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 40 years. He was present with the company from date of enlistment until October 29, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company prior to November 12, 1862, and was present with it until sometime in December, 1863, when he was report absent on sick furlough until sometime in January, 1864. He returned to the company in January 1864, and was present with it, excepting a stint of guard duty at the Military Prison at Atlanta between May and June, 1864, until he was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Solomon Brady (also Solomon Braddy) was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with his mother Mary, an older sister, and five younger brothers. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 17 years. He was present with the company from date of enlistment until October 23, 1862, when he was left sick at a house along the road from Cumberland Gap to Blain’s Crossroads, Tennessee. Whether he survived the war, as well as the date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private John C. Brown (also John Brown) was born ca. 1820 in South Carolina. He married Emily (née Brown) in 1855. He had military training, having served in Captain Edward T. Kendrick’s Company of Florida Mounted Volunteers during the Seminole War of 1856. In 1860, he was living near Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida, with Emily and 9 children. He was a wood chopper by profession, with a declared personal worth of $100. He enlisted May 16, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Reeves for a period of 3 years. He was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee from Big Creek Gap on August 18, 1862. He was reported as absent without leave from November 1, 1862 until a muster report dated November–December, 1863, in which he was identified as having died of disease (unspecified) on November 7, 1863 at the Lumpkin Hospital at Rome, Georgia. He is interred at Myrtle Hill Cemetery, Rome, Floyd County, Georgia.

Private William Buie was born ca. 1812 at Tatnall County, Georgia. He enlisted May 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. He was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee from Big Creek Gap on August 18, 1862. He was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate on November 26, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee, for “old age and debility”. At the time of his discharge, he was described as 6 feet tall with blue eyes, fair skin, gray hair, and by occupation a farmer.

Private John Burghard was born ca. 1837 at Baden, Germany. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He was a daguerreian artist[17] by profession. Burghard was among the first wave of Floridians to volunteer for Confederate service shortly after Florida seceded. He enlisted April 4, 1861 at Quincy, Gadsden County Florida, in Captain Gee’s Company[18] by Captain Jno. Gee for a period of 12 months. Present, age given as 22 years. He was reported present for the entire 12-month period; he was appointed as a drummer on December 1, 1861. He re-enlisted on May 12th, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until January 10, 1863, when he was detached for service as a shoemaker at Knoxville, Tennessee. In December of that year, he was reassigned as a Brigade mail carrier and served in that capacity until February 17, 1864, when he returned to assignment as a shoemaker, now at Atlanta, Georgia. Whether he survived the war, as well as the date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Bogan Cash Caldwell (also Bryan Caldwell, Brogan Caldwell) was born January 23, 1843 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 19 years. He was absent on sick furlough for an unknown period between the date of his enlistment and June 30; however, he was with the company when it left the state, and present with it until he was sent to the hospital at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee on February 13, 1863. He returned to the company on March 13, and was reported present with it until August 24, 1863, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville Tennessee. He was released from the hospital prior to January 15, 1864, and assigned as a teamster[19] for the inclusive period of 15 through 31 January 1864 at Bristol, Tennessee. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida on May 17, 1865. Bogan married Eleanor Matilda (née Staley) in 1867; he moved his family to Mt. Pleasant, Texas, in 1880, then relocated to Lawton, Oklahoma in May, 1901. Elanor passed in May, 1918. Bogan died on January 13, 1934 at Lawton, Comanche County, and is interred at Highland Cemetery, Lawton, Comanche County, Oklahoma.

Private James H. Calhoun was born ca. 1846 in Florida. In 1860, he was living in the home of his parents John N. and Martha near China Hill, Gadsden County, Florida, along with two younger brothers and a younger sister. James and his younger brothers were enrolled in school. James enlisted on May 1, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from enlistment until December 20, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was released from there sometime prior to February 10, 1863; he was present with the company from that date until his capture at Resaca, Georgia, on May 15, 1864. From Resaca, he was sent to the Military Prison at Nashville, Tennessee, arriving there on May 20, and then transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky the following day, and arriving at the Military Prison at Camp Morton outside Indianapolis, Indiana on May 22, 1864. He was released under oath of allegiance on May 18, 1865. At that time, he was described as having a light complexion, dark hair, blue eyes, and being 5’ 10.5” tall, and residing at Quincy, Florida. He married Martha J. (née Long) in 1867 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. James died at Palatka, Putnam County, Florida, on May 6, 1914 and is interred at Paran Baptist Church Cemetery at Putnam Hall, Putnam County, Florida. Martha applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for her husband’s service.

Private Archibold F. Campbell (also Archibald T. Cambell, A T. Cambell) was born ca. 1842. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. He was reported on sick furlough between enlistment and April 30, but was with the company when it left the state. He was reported absent on detached duty at Big Hill, Kentucky on October 17, 1862 to care for wounded. He was captured there by Federal forces on October 29, and ultimately ended up at City Point, Virginia on February 7, 1863. From there, he was sent to Fort McHenry, Maryland, arriving there on February 11, and then to Fortress Monroe, Virginia, where he would be held for exchange. Apparently, his wait was not long; he was reported as sick in a hospital at Greenville, Tennessee on March 4, 1863. Archibold returned to the company prior to March 13, 1863, and was present through February, 1864. He was promoted to 3rd Corporal between July 9 and October 31, 1863. He is reported on a muster for Company B, 1st Regiment Troops and Defenses at Macon, Georgia dated November–December 1864 as being absent without leave, at Camp Wright with Provost Guard. He is last reported as surrendering at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865, and being paroled from there on May 18, 1865. The date and location of his death, and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Milton J. Campbell (also Milton J. Cambell, N. J. Campbell) was born ca. 1845 in South Carolina. In 1860 he was living at the residence of John Campbell near Alpharetta, Georgia. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His stated age was 18. Much of his recorded service is illegible; however, he was reported absent on numerous occasions, being detailed on police duty at Knoxville, Tennessee, or as a nurse at the Asylum Hospital at Dalton, Georgia in late 1863. He was reported as being on a furlough as of March 13, 1864. He is last reported as surrendering at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865, and being paroled from there on May 15, 1865. He was then described as being 6’ tall, black hair, black eyes, and fair complexion. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Abel A. Chester (also Abel Chester) was born ca. 1832 at Decatur County, Georgia. He enlisted May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Age not given; absent on sick furlough. Almost all of his recorded service is illegible; however, he was reported to have been discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate on October 18, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was then described as 5’ 10” tall, with florid complexion, blue eyes, sandy hair, and by occupation a farmer. The date and location of his death, and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Marion A. Chester was born ca 1837 in Florida. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with his wife Nancy and two young children. He was a laborer by profession, with a declared personal worth of $200. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 25 years. He was absent on sick furlough for an unknown period between the date of his enlistment and June 30; however, he was with the company when it left the state, and present with it until he died from disease on October 15, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private Stephen W. Chester was born ca. 1832 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, with his wife Margaret and three young children. He was a laborer by profession, with a declared personal worth of $200. He enlisted May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Age not given; absent on sick furlough. Almost all of his recorded service is illegible; however, he was reported to have been present with the company from April 30 through July 9, 1863. He is last recorded as having died of disease in the Hill Hospital at Ringgold, Georgia on October 26, 1863. His place of interment is unknown.

Private James F. Copeland (also James Copland; James Copeland) was born ca. 1825 at Old Creek Nation (Tatnall County), Georgia. James and wife Martha Sarah (née Plym) were pioneer settlers of Thomas County, Georgia, in 1845. In 1860, he was living near Bristol in Liberty County, Florida with his wife Martha, and 6 children. He was a farm laborer by profession, with a declared personal worth of $141. He enlisted March 27, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Age given as 34 years. He was present with the company when it left the state but was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 13, 1862. After his release from the hospital, he was detailed as a carpenter from September 16, 1862 until he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia on November 25, 1863. He was captured at Missionary Ridge before arriving at Chickamauga. He was transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 8, 1863. He was transferred from there to Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, arriving there on December 11. He took the Oath of Allegiance on October 26, 1864. He had volunteered for service in the U.S. Army, but was rejected. At the time of his release, he was described as 5’ 8” tall, with florid complexion, auburn hair, hazel eyes, 37 years old, and residing at Bristol, Florida. He died in 1865 at Bristol, Liberty County, Florida, and is interred at Bold Springs Cemetery, Caro, Grady County, Georgia.

Rock Island Prison Barracks (Rock Island, Illinois). Located on a 946-acre island in the Mississippi River, Rock Island prison Barracks was operational for 20 months during the Civil War. Constructed in 1863 on approximately 12-acres, the prison had 84 wooden-framed barracks that each accommodated 120 prisoners. Rock Island Prison Barracks didn't receive Confederate prisoners until December 1863. The prison started with 468 prisoners, but within a few weeks the population was over 5,000 and eventually reached 8,594 prisoners. The prison had a 12 foot high wooden fence, sentry boxes every 100 feet, trenches inside the fence and bedrock that deterred tunneling to contain the prisoners. Escape would be difficult but not impossible, as prison records show 41 successful escapes.[20](Image credit: Wisconsin Historical Society, accessed 2015-11-21)

Private Richard Crosby (also Richard Crabbs) was born ca. 1835 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Blue Creek in Liberty County, Florida at the residence of Daniel Stoutamire, a rather well-off farmer, with his wife Adah. Richard was a farm laborer with real estate valued at $50, and with a declared personal worth of $45. He enlisted March 26, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Age given as 26 years. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until December 29, 1862 when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was reported to have died of disease at the military hospital at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee on March 11, 1863.

Private Reuben Curbo (also Reuben Cubo) was born ca. 1820. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years, as a substitute for 2d Sergeant Andrew Joseph Smith. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until October 4, 1862, when he was left sick at Frankfort, Kentucky. He was carried on the roll as absent without leave from November 25, 1862 through March 13, 1863. He was identified as being a paroled prisoner without leave; he is also identified as being in the Posy Hospital at Dalton, Georgia for the inclusive period of November 15 through 18th. He returned to the company on March 25, 1863; he did not receive pay for the time of his absence, as his explanation of being absent was found unsatisfactory. He was present with the company from March 25, 1863 until his capture at the 3rd Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee on December 7, 1864. After capture, he was transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on January 6, 1865. On January 9, was transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio, arriving there on January 11. He was released under oath of allegiance on June 12, 1865. At the time of his release, he was described as fair complexion, dark hair, blue eyes, 5’ 9” tall, 45 years old, and residing at Decatur County, Georgia. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Camp Chase (Columbus, Ohio). Camp Chase was established on farmland outside of Columbus, Ohio in June of 1861. It began as a training facility preparing Ohio volunteers for the battlefronts of the Civil War. Shortly after it opened, the camp received its first prisoner of war. Five months later, the camp held nearly 300 prisoners, most of them civilian political prisoners from Kentucky and Virginia. After the exchange program deteriorated in the summer of 1863, the prison population at Camp Chase grew to more than 2,000. By 1864, the prison population expanded to 8,000, well more than the facility was designed to handle. As the prison population exploded, living conditions rapidly deteriorated. Diseases, such as smallpox, typhus, and pneumonia, ran rampant in the camp's unsanitary, crowded barracks. Prisoners also suffered from malnutrition and exposure during the harsh winters. By the end of the war and the camp's closure in July 1865, more than 26,000 Confederate prisoners passed through Camp Chase's gates. Of these soldiers, nearly eight percent died while incarcerated.[21](Image credit: Library of Congress)

Private Elijah Franklin Draper (also Elijah F. Draper) enlisted January 14, 1864 at Dalton, Whitfield County, Georgia in Captain Love’s Company by 2d Lieutenant Hendley for a period of 3 years. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Joseph P. S. Elliot (also Joseph D. P. S. Elliot, Joseph P. S. Elliott) was born ca. 1836 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County. He was a merchant by profession, with a declared personal worth of $2,500. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until August 12, 1862, when he was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate at Knoxville, Tennessee. The certificate states that he was discharged due to hernia, and an ulcer on the leg involving bone. At the time of his discharge, he was described being born at Gadsden County, Florida, 26 years old, fair complexion, dark hair, blue eyes, 5’ 6” tall, dark complexion, black eyes, lack hair, and by occupation a farmer. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Nixon Elliott was born February 11, 1840 at Quincy, Gadsden County Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence Sherrod McCall near Quincy, and worked as a clerk. He originally enlisted in Company G of the 1st Florida Infantry on April 21, 1861 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida by Captain Jonathan H. Gee for a period of 12 months. He was present on all rolls from the time of enlistment until April 15, 1862, when his term of enlistment expired. He re-enlisted on May 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by 1st Lieutenant Scott for a period of 2 years. Nixon was present with the company from the date of enlistment until April 12, 1863; he was promoted to Corporal in November, 1862. He was promoted to 1st Sergeant on April 10, 1863, likely as a result of the vacancy created by 1st Sergeant Theophilus S. Luckie’s election to 2d Lieutenant the previous month. Two days after Nixon’s promotion to 1st Sergeant, he was detailed as a permanent guard at Knoxville, Tennessee. The “permanence” of his guard duty was short-lived; he was cited for “conspicuous gallantry and good conduct in battle" on the Confederate Honor Roll for the Battle of Chickamauga, and was captured at the 3rd Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee on December 7, 1864. After capture, he was transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on January 6, 1865. On January 9, was transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio, arriving there on January 11. He was paroled from there in May, 1865. After his parole, he returned to Florida, and attempted to superintend a plantation, but found the laborers unsatisfactory, and moved to Denver, Colorado about 1867, where he took railroad contracts. In 1868, he again relocated to Missouri briefly, and then to Chetopah, Kansas, where he served as sheriff and town manager for five years, and later as its treasurer. During this time, he also purchased and edited the (Labette) county newspaper. In 1880, he again relocated to Wichita, Kansas, where he became successful in a number of enterprises, especially real estate ventures. He married Hortense B. (née Gladden) on June 27, 1884 at St. Claire, Missouri. In 1890, he and his family relocated to Pueblo, Colorado, which became his final home, where he continued in the business of real estate. He died on March 20, 1921 at his home in Pueblo, at the age of 81, and is interred at the Roselawn Cemetery, Pueblo, Pueblo County, Colorado.

Battle of Chickamauga Roll of Honor, Florida. Image credit: "Official Records"

Private Daniel Ferrell (also Danl W. Ferrell) was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860, he was living in the home of his parents William B. and Elizabeth near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida, along with 14 brothers and sisters. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until July 20, 1862, when he was discharged at Knoxville, Tennessee. At the time of his discharge, he was described being 5’ 8” tall, black hair, dark skin, hazel eyes, and by occupation a farmer.

Private Benjamin A. Fleischman (also Benjamin A. Fleishman, Benj Fleishman) was born ca. 1832 at Bavaria, Germany. In 1860 he was living at the home of Ferdinand A. Fleischman in Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, and was a clerk by profession. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company when it left the state, and was promoted to Corporal on November 12, 1862, likely to replace 4th Corporal Samuel Brantley Timmons, who died in August at Knoxville. He was absent from the company during the period March 13 through April 30, 1863, being on unspecified detached service at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company, but was again absent on August 16 and August 22, 1863 at Knoxville, serving on police duty. He was reported absent from the company on September 23, 1863. This may have been due to being wounded at the Battle of Chickamauga. He was admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon Georgia for fever on October 2, 1863, and released on November 14th, 1863. He was with the company from then until his capture at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. He was transported to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on January 2, 1865 and transferred to the military Prison at Camp Chase, Ohio on January 4. He was released under oath of allegiance on May 11, 1865. At the time of his release, he was described as dark complexion, dark hair, dark eyes, 5’ 8” tall, 34 years old, and residing at New York City. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.[22]

Private Simon Fleischman was born on February 21, 1840 at Bavaria, Germany. In 1860 he was living at the home of Philip M. Fleischman in Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, and was a clerk by profession. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company when it left the state. He is recorded present until August 22, 1863 when he was detached for police duty for one day at Knoxville Tennessee. He was captured at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. He was transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 8, 1863. He was transferred from there to Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, arriving there on December 11. He took the Oath of Allegiance on June 25, 1865. At the time of his release, he was described as 5’ 7.5” tall, with fresh complexion, dark hair, hazel eyes, 25 years old, and residing at Quincy, Florida. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for his service in 1907. He died in 1908 at Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, and is interred at Zion Gardens Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

Private Marcus L. Freeman enlisted January 18, 1863 at Knoxville, Tennessee in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Nicholson for a period of 3 years, as a substitute for 4th Sergeant Sherrod McCall. Private Freeman was present with the company from the time of his enlistment until was captured at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. He was transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, and from there to Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, arriving there on December 11. He died of pneumonia while in captivity on January 19, 1865, and is at Rock Island Confederate Cemetery, #226, Rock Island, Rock Island County, Illinois.

Private Charles Gareiss (also “Charles Gorries”, Charles Gaciss) was born December 3, 1834. He enlisted March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was stated as 27 years. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until September 20, 1863. During this period, he was assigned guard duty at Charleston, Tennessee on December 23 at Charleston, Tennessee; Corporal of the Guard at Lowe’s Ferry, Knoxville, Tennessee on August 17, 1863; and Corporal of the Guard at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 22, 1863. He was wounded in action at Chickamauga, Georgia on September 20, 1863 and after being sent to the hospital, was granted a medical furlough from September 28, 1863 through November 7, 1863 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He returned to the company and was captured at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. He was transported to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 19, 1864 and transferred the same day to the military Prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois, where he arrived on December 24. He applied to take the Oath of Allegiance in April 1865, claiming that he was loyal to the Union, and to have been enlisted under false representation. He was discharged from Camp Douglas on June 19, 1865. His home of record was given as Gadsden County, Florida. He died June 11, 1886 and is interred at Western Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.

Private David W. Gilbourn (also David A. Gilburn, Daniel Alexander Gilburn, David A. Gilbourn, David A. Gilborn, Daniel Alexander Gilburn, Daniel Gibburn) was born ca. 1839 in Florida. In 1860 he was living at the home of Henry J. Gilbourne, Sr., along with mother Mary and older brother Henry Jr. at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, and was a laborer by profession. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 23 years. He was present with the company from the date of his enlistment until November 25, 1863, when he was captured at Missionary Ridge. He was sent to the military prison at Nashville, Tennessee, and from there to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 8, 1863. He was transferred on the same day to the at Rock Island Barracks, arriving there on December 16, 1863. He took the Oath of Allegiance at Rock Island on June 22, 1865. At his release, he was described as fresh complexion, brown hair, gray eyes, 5’ 3” tall, age 24 years, and home of record given as Gadsden County, Florida. He is interred at Old Philadelphia Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida; the date of his death is unknown.

Private Henry J. S. Gilbourn, Sr. (also Henry J. Gibburn, Henry J. Gilbourne) was born ca. 1805 at Albany, New York. In 1860 he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida with his wife Mary and two sons; Henry J. Gilborn, Jr., and David W. Gilbourn. Henry (Senior) was was a farmer with real estate valued at $1,000, and with a declared personal worth of $250. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 57 years. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until July 16, 1862. On that date, he was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate at Camp Kirby Smith, Knoxville, Tennessee as a result of an unspecified injury incurred while lifting a cannon which was being dismounted. At the time of his discharge, he was described as being born at Albany, New York, age 57 years, light complexion, light hair, blue eyes, 5’ 7” tall, and by occupation a farmer. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Thomas Goza was born March 9, 1837 at Chester County, South Carolina. In 1860, he was living at his father’s home near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his mother and five siblings. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 24 years. He was present with the company from the date of enlistment until July 16, 1862. On that date, he was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate at Camp Kirby Smith, Knoxville, Tennessee due to valvular disease of the heart.[23] At the time of his discharge, he was described as being born at Chester County, South Carolina, age 24 years, dark complexion, black hair, dark eyes, 5’ 5” tall, and by occupation a farmer. Thomas returned to Quincy, and on September 30, 1862, reenlisted with the Florida Conscripts. He was reported present with them from the time of enlistment through June 1863; there is no further record of service from that time. He married Julia [née McDearmid] on August 3, 1865 at Gadsden County, Florida. Thomas died July 21, 1908 and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Julia applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for her husband’s service.

Private George C. Gray was born in Florida ca. 1843. In 1860, he lived at the home of the James Harrison family, and worked as a laborer. He enlisted March 13, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was reported absent on sick furlough, but rejoined the company in Tennessee. He was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 30, 1862, and died there of unspecified cause on November 9, 1862. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee.

Private Thomas Green enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 46 years. He was present with the company until March 1, 1864, when he was detached for service as a leather finisher at Atlanta, Georgia. He served there until July 31, 1864. There are no further records of his service until December 9, 1864, when he was reported to have died at the Forrest Hospital at Lauderdale, Mississippi. He is interred at Lauderdale Springs CSA Cemetery, Lauderdale, Lauderdale County, Mississippi.

Private Thomas Hall (also Thomas Hill) was born in Alabama ca. 1835. In 1860, he was living with his wife Penelope and three children in Holmes County, Florida. He enlisted May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Reported absent on sick furlough at the time of enlistment, and may not have been with the company when it left the state; however, he was with the company in Tennessee after June 30, and was with it until October 20th, 1862 when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville. He remained with the company until April 2, 1863 when he was detailed as a permanent guard at Knoxville. He was again sent to the hospital on September 8, returning sometime before November 1, 1863. He was present with the company from this time until July 22, 1864 when he was captured near Atlanta, Georgia. He was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he died of variola[24] on November 12, 1864. He is interred at Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery, #453, Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio.

Private J. B. Halloway (also T. B. Halloway) was discharged for disability at Camp Kirby Smith, Knoxville, Tennessee by order of Colonel J. J. Finley on August 12, 1862.

Private William S. Harrison was born ca. 1822 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County with his wife Patsy and three sons. He was a carpenter, with real estate valued at $300 and a declared personal worth of $3,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 40 years. He was detailed as a housebuilder in May 1862, but rejoined the company between June 30 and October 28, 1862; he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on that date. He apparently received a medical furlough; he died of unspecified disease at Gadsden County, Florida on December 7, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private Franklin Holloway was born ca. 1837 at Edgefield County, South Carolina. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 25 years. He was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 17, 1862, and discharged from there under Surgeon’s Certificate on November 13, 1862 due to the effects of typhoid fever and erysipelas. At the time of his discharge, he was described as being born in Edgefield District, South Carolina, age 25 years, light complexion, light hair, blue eyes, 5’ 9” tall, and by occupation a farmer. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Lewis E. Holly was born ca. 1842 in Georgia. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 23 years. He was absent on sick furlough and died of unspecified disease on October 15, 1862 at Gadsden County, Florida. His place of interment is unknown.

Private Henry Howell was born ca. 1813 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Jacksonville, Duval County, Florida with his wife Ede and five children. He was a farmer, with real estate valued at $100 and a declared personal worth of $100. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 49 years. He was absent sick at the time of enlistment, but returned to the company. He died of unspecified cause at Knoxville, Tennessee on July 9, 1862 and is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private John Howell was born ca. 1842 in Florida. In 1860 he was living at his father’s residence near Quincy, along with his mother and five younger brothers. He was a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. He was absent sick at the time of enlistment, but rejoined the company, and was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 30, 1862. He was reported absent from 15 January through March 13, 1863. He was assigned to guard duty at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 17, 1863 and again on August 22nd. He was detailed as a cook from December 28, 1863 through February, 1864. He was admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospital as an in-patient for pneumonia and debility with anemia on July 29, 1864. He is believed to have been granted a furlough of 60 days; he eventually returned to the company, and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. Private Howell died in 1898, and is interred at the Howell Burial Plot, Dukes Station, Union County, Florida.

Private David Ingram was born ca. 1838 at Decatur County, Georgia, and is the brother of Private William J. Ingram. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 24 years. He was assigned to guard duty at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 17, 1863 and again on August 22nd. He was detailed as a cook from December 28, 1863 through February, 1864. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private William J. Ingram was born ca. 1840 at Decatur County, Georgia. He is the brother of Private David Ingram. William enlisted on March 18, 1861 in Company G, 1st Regiment of Georgia Volunteer Infantry at Decatur, Georgia, and was mustered out March 18, 1862 at Augusta, Georgia. He reenlisted on May 10, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Waller’s Company (8th Florida Infantry) by Captain Waller for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 22 years. In mid-1862, he was exchanged to Company B, 6th Florida Infantry for Private Nathaniel G. Shaw on June 14, 1862. He was promoted to 2nd Corporal on April 10, 1863 but was reduced to Private mid-1863. He was captured near Marietta, Georgia on July 5, 1864, and sent to the Military Prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois. He died of variola on December 14, 1864, and is interred at the Oak Woods Cemetery, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

Private Berrian Johnson (also Benian Johnson) enlisted May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company for a period of 3 years. He went absent without leave on September 1, 1862 and was dropped from the company roll after May, 1863. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Camp Douglas (Chicago, Illinois). Considered the "Andersonville of the North", Camp Douglas was one of the longest continuous operating prison camps of the Civil War. Located south of Chicago, the prison was built on land provided to the state by the estate of Stephen Douglas. Camp Douglas held a total of 30,000 Confederate prisoners during the Civil War. Like many other prison camps, overcrowding, poor sanitary conditions and inadequate shelter lead to sickness and death. Death also came as a result of withholding rations, torture by prison guards and neglect of soldiers who were ill. Inept record keeping makes it nearly impossible to calculate the number of dead soldiers buried in mass graves at Camp Douglas. (Image credit: Harper's Weekly, April 5, 1862)

Private Erwin W. Johnson (also Irwin Johnson; Ervin W. Johnson) enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 26 years. He was assigned to guard duty at Knoxville, Tennessee on for an extended period from December, 1862 until at least April 1863, and was present with the company until his capture at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. He was sent to Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 21 and being transferred to the military Prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois, where he arrived on December 24. He was mustered into the 5th Regiment, U. S. Volunteer Infantry on April 14, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private George W. Johnson (also George D. Johnson) was born ca. 1842. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 30 years. He died of unspecified cause at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 2, 1862 and is interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private John H. Johnson (also John W. Johnson) enlisted August 18, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida by Captain Scott for a period of 3 years. He died of unspecified cause at Tazewell, Tennessee on December 20, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private William George Johnson (also W. G. Johnson) was born July 21, 1838 at Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted May 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent from the date of enlistment until March 13, 1863. He rejoined the company, and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. Married Dora Jane (née Ferrell) at Gadsden County, Florida January 21, 1892. William died at Gadsden County, Florida on February 24, 1922 and is interred at Concord Cemetery, Concord, Gadsden County, Florida.

Private William Floyd Johnson (also William F. Johnson, W. F. Johnson) was born ca. 1841 in Georgia. In 1860 he was living at his father’s residence near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida along with his mother and eight younger brothers and sisters. He was a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. Records indicate that he was absent on sick furlough at the time of enlistment, and was hospitalized sometime between June30th and November 12, 1862. He was captured at Murfreesboro, Tennessee on December 7, 1864 and transferred to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky on January 5, 1865. He was transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio on January 9, 1865, and released under oath on June 12, 1865. He was described as 25 years old, dark complexion, dark hair, dark eyes, 5’ 9” tall, and home of record as Gadsden County, Florida. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private John W. Johnston was born ca. 1842 in Florida. In 1860 he was living at his father’s residence near China Hill, Gadsden County, Florida along with his mother and two younger sisters. He was a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. He was killed at Chickamauga, Georgia on September 19, 1863. His place of interment is unknown.

Private William B. Jones was born ca. 1842. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was sent to a hospital in mid-1863, and was absent without leave after. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 15, 1865, and was described as 5’ 8” tall, light hair, blue eyes, fair skin. The date and location of his death and his place of interment, are unknown.

Private Lawrence R. Joyner was born September 27, 1841 at Decatur County, Georgia. In 1860 he was living at his father’s residence near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida along with his mother, three siblings, and another minor. He was a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 19 years. His service records are illegible from the date of his enlistment until August 17, when he is identified as being on police duty on the streets in Knoxville Tennessee, and being relieved the following day. He was captured at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863 and sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 5. He was transferred the following day to the Rock Island, Illinois and held in confinement until February, 1865 when he was exchanged with other sick and/or wounded prisoners. He arrived at Receiving and Wayside Hospital, or General Hospital No. 9, Richmond, Virginia on February 25, 1865, was admitted, and then transferred the following day to General Hospital, Howard’s Grove, Richmond, Virginia for chronic diarrhea. He was issued a passport while an in-patient on March 10, 1865, to Abbeville, South Carolina. He was released from the hospital on March 24, 1865 with a 60-day furlough, that being taken at Gadsden County, Florida. He was still on furlough at the war’s end, and took the Oath of Allegiance at Tallahassee on May 15, 1865. He was described as 5’ 11’ tall, blue eyes, light hair, and fair complexion. He remained in Gadsden County after the war, and married Brancy [née Wilcox] at Gadsden County on January 14, 1869. He was a farmer, and still living in Gadsden County as late as 1898. He applied for a Confederate pension during that time, but was denied for what appears to be an administrative issue. In 1906, he and Brancy had relocated to Campville, Alachua County, Florida, where he again applied for and was this time awarded a Confederate pension. Lawrence died at Campville, Alachua County, Florida on June 24, 1907. His place of interment is unknown. Brancy applied for and was awarded a Confederate pension for her husband’s service.

Private William Lawrence (son of Private William C. Lawrence, also of Company B) was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860 he was living at his father’s residence near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida along with his father, mother, four younger siblings, and another minor. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 17 years. He died of unknown cause in the hospital at Columbus, Georgia, on June 26, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private William C. Lawrence (father of Private William Lawrence, also of Company B) was born ca. 1820 in Maine. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida along with his wife Adele, five children, and another minor. He was a master carpenter by profession, with real estate valued at $1,000 and a declared personal worth of $2,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 43 years. He was absent on detached service as a carpenter in Florida by order of General Joseph Finegan (then commanding the Department of Middle and East Florida) from August 1, 1862 through February 1864. He was described in an undated “Descriptive List and Account of Pay and Clothing” as 5’ 6” tall, blue eyes, light hair and light complexion. There is no further record of is service; the date and place of death, and his place of interment is unknown.

Private Zachariah Madison Lott (also Zachariah M. Lott, Z. Madison Lott, Z. M. Lott, Z. N. Lott) was born ca. 1815 in Henry County, Mississippi. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida along with his wife Julia and three daughters. He was a blacksmith by profession, without declared real estate and a declared personal worth of $1,000. He enlisted for state service on September 4, 1862 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry, and was appointed 2nd Corporal. He re-enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company until July 20, 1862, when he was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate for “prolapses of the rectum” at Knoxville, Tennessee. At his discharge he was described as 48 years of age, 5’ 10” tall, dark complexion, hazel eyes, black hair, and by occupation a black smith. The date and place of death, and his place of interment is unknown.

Private Jesse C. Mann (also J. C. Mann) was born ca. 1836 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida along with his wife Mary and three children. He was a overseer, without declared real estate or declared personal worth. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 35 years. He was absent from the company for the period of March 12 to April 30, 1862 on unspecified detached duty. He did return to the company, but was again absent beginning on October 8, 1862 when he was left sick near Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. He was absent from that time until March 13, 1863; his [unauthorized] absence appears to have caught up with him, as he suffered a pay stoppage for the inclusive period of February 28, through April 30, 1863. He was present with the company until sometime between January and February, 1864. He was captured at the Battle of Resaca, Georgia on May 15, 1864. He was sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there between the 18th and 23 May. He was transferred from there on May 23, 1864 to the Military Prison at Alton, Illinois, where he remained until February 25, 1865. Originally destined for the Military Prison at Point Lookout, Maryland, he was instead transferred to the Marine U.S.A. General Hospital (Small Pox H), at Baltimore, Maryland, where he was admitted on March 2, 1865. He was transferred to Fort McHenry on April 27, 1865 and released under Oath of Allegiance on May 1. His residence was given as Tallahassee, Florida. The date and place of death, and his place of interment is unknown.

Private Milton M. Mann was born ca. 1836. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 26 years. Most of his service records are illegible; however, he is documented as being on detached service as a teamster for the regiment’s wagons from September 5 through November 26, 1862. And on police duty at Knoxville, Tennessee from November 19, 1862 through March 31, 1863. He is also recorded as being on guard duty in the streets at Knoxville, Tennessee for the period 17–18 August 1863. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 16, 1865 and was described as 5’ 6” tall, light hair, blue eyes, fair skin. The date and place of death, and his place of interment is unknown.

Private Richard Marsh was born ca. 1832 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living in Decatur County, Georgia, along with his wife Rhoda and three children. He was a wheelwright, with real estate valued at $100 and a declared personal worth of $100. He enlisted May 20, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Reported absent on sick furlough. He died of unspecified cause at Knoxville, Tennessee on October 13, 1862. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private Jeremiah J. Martin (also Jeremiah Martin) was born September 3, 1841 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at his mother’s residence near Mount Pleasant, Gadsden County, Florida, along with three older and two younger siblings. He was a laborer on his mother’s farm, and had attended school. He enlisted March 18, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. He was absent when the company left he state, but rejoined it later in the summer. He was discharged under Surgeon’s certificate at Knoxville, Tennessee on July 16, 1862. According to the surgeon’s certificate, Jeremiah suffered extensive ulceration on one leg, rendering him incapable of walking without considerable pain; also a pre-existing and unspecified disease, prior to his entering service, and which the Surgeon could not diagnose, as well as general debility. At the time of his discharge, he was described as 20 years of age, 5’ 6” tall, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair, and by occupation a farmer. He re-enlisted on September 3, 1862 at the Conscripts Camp of Instruction for Florida at Gadsden County, Florida by E. M. Owens for 3 years. He was transferred to Company A, 6th Florida Infantry on June 28, 1864 and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina, on May 1, 1865. He married Margaret M [née Ferrell] at Gadsden County on November 15, 1872. Jeremiah died on August 12th, 1878 at Gadsden County, Florida and is interred at Sycamore Cemetery, Gadsden County, Florida. Margaret applied for and was awarded a Confederate pension for her husband’s service.

Private Benjamin Mashman was identified as being captured at Nashville, Tennessee on December 16, 1864. At the time of his capture, he was documented as being assigned to Company B, 6th Florida Infantry.

Private Marcus Mathis (also M. Mathis) was born ca. 1846 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida, at the residence of Elizabeth Bloodsworth, along with his younger sister. He enlisted March 18, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 17 years. He was dropped soon after enlistment.

Private John Edwin Mayton (also John E. Mayton, J. E. Maton) was born January 24, 1844 at Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at his mother’s residence near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with four younger siblings. He was a laborer on his mother’s farm, and had attended school within 12 months of the census. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 17 years. He was absent on a sick furlough for the period March 12 to June 30, 1862; he was listed as present from June 30, 1862 through April 6, 1863 when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He was detailed as a hospital nurse at Knoxville, Tennessee from June 4 through October 31, 1863. He was reported present with the company for November and December, 1863; the remaining military service records are illegible. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 15, 1865 and was described as 5’ 6” tall, light hair, gray eyes, and fair skin. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for his service in 1909. The date and place of death, and his place of interment are unknown.

Private David H. McDougald (also David H. McDongald) was born ca. 1830 at Franklin County, Florida. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Florida along with his wife Elizbeth and infant son James. He was a farmer, with real estate valued at $600 and a declared personal worth of $400. He enlisted April 28, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate on August 13, 1862 at Knoxville, Tennessee due to splenitis and hepatitis. He was described as 5’ 5” tall, dark complexion, hazel eyes, and black hair. The date and place of death, and his place of interment are unknown.

Private James H. McDougald (also James McDougal) was born ca. 1843 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, along with two younger brothers. He was a laborer on his father’s farm, and had attended school within 12 months of the census. He enlisted April 10, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. James died of unspecified cause in a hospital at London, Kentucky on September 7, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private Albert Booth McElvy (also Albert B. McElvey, A. B. McElvey, Albert B. McElvy) was born ca. 1844 in Florida. In 1860, he, along with his mother and three younger siblings, was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida, at the residence of his father, L. G. McElvy, a very well-to-do lawyer/planter reporting a real estate value of some $18,000, and a personal estate valued at $20,000. along with his mother and three younger siblings. He had attended school within 12 months of the census. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 19 years. He was dropped from the company soon after, likely as a result of a previous enlistment with Company D, 5th Florida Cavalry that occurred on March 3, 1862 at Newport, Wakulla County, Florida. He transferred to Company D, 5th Battalion of Florida Cavalry (Captain Lawson Gamble McElvey, commanding) on September 1, 1863. He was reported as absent without leave for the period August 31, 1864 through April 30, 1865. He was paroled at Tallahassee, Florida on May 13, 1865 and was described as 5’ 10” tall, light hair, hazel eyes, and light complexion. He married Sarah J. (Sallie Ann) Moore (nee Alderman) ca. 1865 in Florida. He applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate Pension for his service in 1904. He died in 1922, and is interred at Woodbery-Womack Cemetery, Havana, Gadsden County, Florida.

Private Archibald McKenzie (also Archibald B. McKenzie) was born ca. 1838. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 24 years. He was present with the company from time of enlistment until October 30, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee, for unspecified illness. He was detailed on December 23, 1862 as a guard at Charleston, Tennessee. He was absent August 17, when he is identified as being on police duty on the streets in Knoxville Tennessee, and being relieved the following day. He was on detached service to the Quartermaster Department beginning on December 23, 1863 for an unspecified period. He was reported to have suffered a slight wound to his hand (unspecified) at Resaca, Georgia on May 14, 1864. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Daniel J. McKenzie (also David J. McKenzie) was born ca. 1842. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 20 years. He was present with the company from time of enlistment until December 19, 1862, when he was detailed to police at Knoxville, Tennessee. He served there until April 30, 1863, when he rejoined the company. His remaining records are illegible; however, he is documented to have surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on may 10th, 1865, and was paroled from there on May 17, 1865. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Archibald McPhaul (also Arch McPhaul) was born ca. 1818 in North Carolina. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Florida. He was a mechanic, with a declared personal worth of $100. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 44 years. He was reported absent on sick furlough from March 12 through April 30, 1862, but returned to the company on June 30, 1862. He is reported present with the company until February 7, 1863, when died of unspecified disease at Knoxville, Tennessee. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private Evander McPhaul was born August 13, 1844 in Florida. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was reported as present with the company from the time of enlistment, and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina May 1, 1865. After the war, Evander relocated to Bastrop County Texas. He died November 16, 1903, and is interred at Milton Chapel Cemetery, Bastrop County, Texas.

Private Andrew J. Miller (also Andrew J. Miller, Jr.) was born in Madison County, Florida, ca. 1844. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence near Concordia, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his mother and five younger siblings. His occupation was given as a laborer, likely on his father’s farm. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 18 years. He was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate on November 8, 1862, due to “constitutional debility”. He was described as 5’ 5” tall, light hair, grey eyes, and fair complexion, and a farmer by occupation. Andrew died February 19, 1925, and is interred at Bethlehem Cemetery, Bonifay, Holmes County Florida.

Private Nickleberry B. Moore was born ca. 1819 in Georgia. He is the father of Private Seaborn Moore. In 1860, he was living at his near Concordia, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his wife Sarah and five children. He was a carpenter, with a declared personal worth of $300. He and his oldest son enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Nickleberry’s age was stated as 44 years. From the time of enlistment through April 30, 1862, he was reported as absent on detached duty. He returned to the company sometime after June 1, 1862 and was with it until November 8, 1862, when he was left sick near Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. He was reported as being paroled by Union forces on November 20, 1862; he was reported absent without leave while recovering from illness in Florida through February, 1864. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Private Seaborn Moore was born ca. 1841 in Georgia. He is the oldest son of Private Nickleberry Moore. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence near Concordia, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his mother and four younger siblings. He was a was listed as a laborer. He and his father enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Seaborn’s age was stated as 23 years. He was rejected by the Inspecting Officer on April 19, 1862. The date and location of his death and his place of interment are unknown.

Alton Military Prison (Alton, Illinois). The Alton Military Prison was originally built in 1833 as the first state penitentiary in Illinois and later closed in 1857. During the American Civil War, the prison was reopened in 1862 to accommodate the growing population of Confederate prisoners of war. The prison housed over 11,000 prisoners during the war. Deaths at the prison were more common than at other Union prisons, and prisoners faced harsh conditions and regular outbreaks of diseases such as smallpox and rubella. 1,534 Confederate soldiers and many Union soldiers and civilians are known to have died at the prison. (Image credit: "Alton in the Civil War")

Private Admiral Nelson was born February 3, 1819 in Sumpter County, South Carolina. May 3, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company until December 18, 1862, when he was assigned as a permanent guard at Knoxville. He remained assignment until April 30, 1863, when he returned to the company. He was with the company until October 28, 18863, when he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia. He returned to the company sometime in January, 1864. He was captured at Chickamauga, Georgia on May 14, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on May 21. He was transferred to the Military Prison, Alton, Illinois on May 23, 1864, arriving there two days later. On December 7, 1864, he was transferred back to the military prison at Rock Island, Illinois, arriving there the next day. He remained a prisoner there until his release on May 25, 1865. He is reported as having contracted a sore [right] eye while at Rock Island, resulting in its ultimate loss. After the war, he returned to Florida. He relocated to Decatur County, Georgia in January, 1869. He applied for and was awarded a Confederate pension from the state of Georgia in 1891. He married Annie (née Payne) on March 20, 1891 at Grady County, Georgia. They relocated back to Gadsden County, Florida on February 2, 1914; Admiral applied for a Confederate pension from the state of Florida. The Florida pension was denied because due to Admiral not having the requisite 10 years residency at the time of application. Admiral died on May 16, 1915 at Perry in Taylor County; his place of interment is unknown. Annie applied for and was awarded a widow’s pension for Admiral’s service on December 10, 1915.

Private James B. Nelson was born August 3, 1828 at Pulaski, Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concordia, Gadsden County, Florida, along with his wife Sarah and two young children. He was a carpenter, with a declared personal worth of $1,000. He enlisted April 26, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent on a sick furlough from the time of enlistment until sometime in May, when he was detached from the company for a house-building detail. He returned to the company in June, and was with it until October 30th, 1862, when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to duty by November 12, 1862, was promoted to Corporal on April 10, 1863, and was present with the company until July 5, 1863, when he was again when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company, but was again sent to the hospital on September 6, 1863, this time at Cleveland, Georgia. He was present with the company from November, 1863 until July 9, 1864, when he was admitted to the Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon, Georgia for a gunshot wound in left leg, passing through the tibia. Was furloughed on July 12, 1864 for 60 days. He is last recorded as having surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and was paroled on May 20th, 1865. After the war, he returned to Gadsden County, Florida. He married Sarah Ann in December, 1893. Admiral applied for and was awarded a Confederate pension from the state of Florida. James died on May 10, 1906 in Gadsden County; his place of interment is unknown. Sarah applied for and was awarded a widow’s pension for James’ service.

Angus McKay Nicholson, Company B, 6th Florida Infantry. (Image Credit: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory)

Private Angus McKay Nicholson (also Angus Nicholson) was born in Florida on July 5, 1834. He is the older brother of 3rd Sergeant Malcolm Monroe Nicholson, and cousin of Junior 2nd Lieutenant Donald Angus Nicholson). Angus married Sarah "Sally" Overstreet (née Wyatt) from Gadsden County in 1854. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida with his wife Sarah, two young children, his brother Malcolm, and George Sawyer, a 53-year old school teacher from Virginia. Angus was a well-to-do farmer; he and his brother Archibald were two of the pioneer tobacco growers in Gadsden County. Angus owned real estate in the value of $10,000, and reported a personal worth of $10,000. He enlisted March 11, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. Present with company from date of enlistment, he was promoted to 2nd Sergeant on November 7, 1862; to 1st Sergeant on April 10th, 1863; detached for service as the [6th Florida Infantry] Acting Regimental Quartermaster on June 17, 1863; appointed Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant on August 15, 1863. He was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. After the war, Angus returned to Gadsden County; he and Sarah had seven more children. He also served as Clerk of Circuit Court for Gadsden County. Angus died on January 28, 1894, and is interred at the Nicholson-Freeman Cemetery, Gadsden County, Florida. Sarah applied for and was awarded a widow’s pension for Angus’ service.

Private Henry M. Owens (also Montgomery Owens) was born in Florida ca. 1842. In 1860, he was living near Quincey, Florida at the residence of John Pitt, along with Isabella Pitt and his younger sister Meradith Owens. Henry had attended school within the 12 months preceding the 1860 census. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Scott for a period of 3 years. His age was stated as 19 years. He was absent from the company from the time of enlistment until June3 0th, 1862 on a sick furlough. He rejoined the company and was with it until October 6, 1862 when he was left sick near Salvica, Kentucky. He was reported as dying of disease near Tullahoma, Tennessee on November 18, 1862. He is interred at the Maplewood Cemetery, Tullahoma, Coffee County, Tennessee.

Private William Benjamin Parrott (also W. B. Parrott, William B. Parrott, William Benjamin Parott) was born February 5, 1842 at Darlington County, South Carolina. In 1860, he was living near Concordia, Florida at the residence of Norman T. Scott family, along with five of his younger siblings. William was a laborer, and had attended school within the 12 months preceding the 1860 census. He married Rebecca Ann (née Townson) on August 31, 1861 at Darlington, South Carolina. Enlisted March 11, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. Age stated as 20 years. He left the state with the company, but was left sick at Columbus, Georgia on June 17, 1862. He apparently made his way back to Tallahassee; he was reported as sick in the hospital there, without leave, from that date until July 9, 1863. In January 1863, he was described as being 5’ 5” tall, fair complexion, dark eyes, dark hair, and by profession a farmer. He returned to the company, but was detached for duty as a nurse in the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 20, 1863. He was reported present with the company for the period of November 1863 through February 1864, and was paroled at Greensboro, North Carolina on May 1, 1865. After the war, William returned to Leon County, Florida. William and Rebecca had one child during the war (1863), and another five between 1866 and 1880. Rebecca died on January 10, 1896. William remarried on February 2, 1898 to Catherine Lucretia (née Ellis). William applied for and was awarded a confederate pension for his service. He died on November 27, 1911 at Tallahassee, Florida, and is interred at the City Cemetery, Tallahassee, Leon County, Florida.

Private William H. Perkins enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Rank given as Private. Present. Age stated as 20 years. He was rejected by the inspecting officer soon after.

Private William F. Ray (also F. Ray; William F. Wray, W. F. Ray) was born in Georgia ca. 1827. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Florida along with wife Martha, 4 children, and a domestic. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 30 years. He was present with the company from the time of enlistment until January 29, 1863 when he was granted a sick furlough. He was documented as absent without leave beginning on March 9, 1863, but returned to the company by April 30, 1863. He remained with the company from that point until being reported as missing in action at Missionary Ridge on November 25, 1863. He was reported as being taken a prisoner and sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 6, 1863. He was transferred on the same day to the Military Prison at Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, arriving there on December 9, 1863. William died of typhoid fever while in captivity on April 28, 1864. He is interred at the Rock Island Confederate Cemetery, Rock Island, Rock Island County, Illinois.

Private Rufus R. Reynolds (also R. Reynolds, R.R. Reynolds) enlisted May 14, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He died of unspecified disease at Chattanooga, Tennessee on June 26, 1862. His place of interment is unknown.

Private Jacob Rich was born ca. 1844. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 18 years. He was rejected by the Inspecting Officer on April 19, 1862.

Private John F. Rich (also John B. Rich) was born in Georgia ca. 1836. In 1860, he was living near Aspalaga, Liberty County, Florida, at the residence of Alfred Rich, a farmer. Jon gave his occupation as a farm laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His age was given as 26 years. He was on a sick furlough from the date of his enlistment, and was left sick at Gadsden County when the company left the state. He returned to the company on or before November 12, 1862, but was discharged for unspecified reason at Strawberry Plains, Tennessee on February 5, 1863.

Private Fredrick W. Schwarzenbach (also Franklin Schwarzenbach, Fredrick W. Schwartenbach) was born ca. 1815. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 47 years. On June 15, 1862, he was detached by order Brigadier General James H. Trapier, commanding the Department of East and Middle Florida on June 15, 1862, to serve as a gunsmith (master armorer) in the Ordnance Department at Tallahassee, Florida. He served there until February 28, 1863, when he was transferred to the Ordnance Department at Lake City, Florida. He served there until at least April 30, 1863; sometime between that date and March 30, 1864, he was transferred to Savannah, Georgia. On March 30, 1864, he was detached on a special, temporary assignment to Charleston, South Carolina, upon conclusion of which he was to return to Savannah. He was transferred to the Confederate States Engineer Troops on August 4, 1864. The date of his death and location of interment are unknown.

Private Thomas H. Scott was born in Williamsburg, South Carolina ca. 1829. In 1860, he was living near Quincy, Florida along with wife Sarah, and three young children. He was quite wealthy; a farmer with a combined property/personal worth of $22,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was discharged at Knoxville, Tennessee on August 12, 1862 under Surgeon’s Certificate due to a severe attack of pneumonia and an almost complete loss of one lung. His discharge certificate states that he was born in the Williamsburg District of South Carolina, aged 33 years, five feet ten inches high, blue eyes, light auburn hair, and by occupation a farmer. The date of his death and location of interment are unknown.

Private Nathaniel George Shaw (also Nathanl Shaw, Nathaniel G. Shaw, Nathaniel G. Snow) was born on February 7, 1843 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence near Quincy, Florida along with his mother and six younger brothers and sisters. His father was a farmer of some means; Nathaniel was a laborer. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. Age given as 19 years. He was exchanged with Captain Walker’s company (Company B, 8th Florida Infantry) for William J. Walker on June 14, 1862. Nathaniel was killed in action at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 3, 1863. He is interred at the Confederate Cemetery, Fredericksburg, Fredericksburg City, Virginia.

Private Alexander Love Smith (also Alex. L. Smith, Alexander L. Smith) was born on May 10, 1829 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida with wife Sarah (née Levy), and infant Charles. Others in residence were Abner W. Smith, William W. Love, and Martha Levy. Alexander was a merchant of no small means, claiming real estate valued at $4,500, and a personal value of $27,000. He enlisted March 14, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. Age given as 30 years. He was appointed ACS (Assistant Commissary of Subsistence)[25] with the rank of Captain on May 1, 1862 at Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, and transferred to the 6th Florida Infantry’s Regimental Headquarters. He served in that capacity for the duration of the war; the date and location of his death and place of interment are unknown.

Private Samuel Strange was born ca. 1842 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at his mother’s residence near Quincy, Florida along with a younger sister and two younger brothers. His occupation was given as a laborer. He enlisted April 28, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent on a sick furlough from date of enlistment until June 30, 1862. He was present with the company until January 18, 1863 when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He rejoined the company prior to February 21, 1863, when he was again reported absent on a sick furlough. He was reported absent sick in Florida from March 22, 1863, but returned to the company by April 30, 1863. From that date, he was reported present with the company through the end of February 1864. There is no further record of his service from that date; the date and location of his death and place of interment are unknown.

Private Abel Strickland (also Abel Stricklin) was born ca. 1831 at Thomas County, Georgia. He married Lucy (née Vickers) ca. 1856 at Gadsden County Florida. In 1860, he was living at his near Concord, Florida with a Lucy, four young children, Lucy’s mother, and a 15-year-old laborer. At that time, Abel was a farmer, claiming real estate valued at $1,200, and a personal value of $1,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough from the time of enlistment, and was left in Gadsden County when the regiment left the state. He was listed as absent until sometime after February 1863. He was discharged at Knoxville, Tennessee on June 18, 1863 under Surgeon’s Certificate; the reason is unknown as the surviving records are illegible. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10th, 1865 and was paroled on May 19th, 1865. He died of on November 18th, 1891 at Gadsden County, Florida. His place of interment is unknown. Lucy applied for and was awarded a widow’s pension for Abel’s service.

Private Green B. Strickland (also Green Berry Strickland, G. B. Strickland) was born June 12, 1837 at Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia. He relocated to Tallahassee, Florida in 1860. The census lists M. J. Strickland (19-year-old female) and F. P. Strickland (1-year-old male) as residing with him. Green was a farmer, claiming real estate valued at $500, and a personal value of $6,000. He enlisted March 12, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough from the time of enlistment, but returned to the company prior to June 30, 1862. He was present from that time through March 13, 1863. He was a patient at St. Mary’s Hospital on November 10, 1864, and discharged at Augusta, Georgia in April, 1865. He was awarded a Confederate for his service. Green died on April 16, 1927 at Arcadia, DeSoto County, Florida, and is interred at the Fort Ogden Cemetery at Fort Ogden, DeSoto County, Florida.

Private Jacob Strickland (also Jacob B. Strickland) was born ca. 1845 in North Carolina. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father, M. N. Strickland, in the 20th Division of Putnam County, along with his mother, and four siblings. He enlisted May 10, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was on sick furlough at the time of enlistment, but rejoined the company. He died of disease at the Asylum Hospital, Knoxville, Tennessee on December 10th, 1862. He is believed to be interred at the Bethel Confederate Cemetery at Knoxville, Tennessee.

Private Joel Strickland (also James Strickland) was born December 20, 1838 in Georgia. He enlisted May 10, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough at the time of enlistment, but had returned to the company by June 30th, 1862. He was present with the company through March 13th, 1863, when he was detached for unspecified service. His record for the period April 30th through December, 1863 are illegible; however, he was sent to the hospital sometime between November 1st and December 31st, 1863. He was present with the company during the inclusive period of January/February, 1864. He was captured near Marietta, Georgia on June 15th, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Nashville, Tennessee, arriving there on June 21st, 1864. He was transferred the same day to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on June 22nd. He was transferred from there on the same day to the Military Prison at Rock Island, Illinois, arriving there on June 24th. On October 31st, 1864, he was released after enlisting in the U.S. Army for frontier service.[26] After the war, Joel returned Cavalry, Grady County, Georgia. He married Almedia (née King) on February 7, 1869. He applied for and was awarded a Georgia Confederate pension for his service[27] . He died November 4th, 1915, and is interred at Piedmont Cemetery, Calvary, Grady County, Georgia.

Private John Strickland was born ca. 1836. He enlisted March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough from the time of enlistment, and was left behind sic at Tallahassee when the regiment left the state. He was reported as absent without leave in Florida from July 15th, 1862 through March 13th, 1863. He rejoined the regiment sometime before September 23rd, 1863; he was admitted to the Floyd House and Ocmulgee Hospital at Macon Georgia on that date for debility. The is no further record of his service; the date and location of his death, and place of interment are unknown.

Private John Robert Strickland (also John R. Strickland, Robert Strickland) was born ca. 1837 in North Carolina. In 1860, he was living at the residence of his father, Hannon Strickland, near Attapulgas, Decatur County, Georgia, along with his mother, and a younger brother. His occupation was given as a farm laborer. He enlisted on May 13th, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough at the time of enlistment. He died on August 7th, 1862 at Decatur County, Georgia. He is interred at Piedmont Cemetery, Calvary, Grady County, Georgia.

Private William H. Tomberlin (also W. H. Tomlin, William Tomberland) was born ca. 1837 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living at the residence of Henry Edwards near Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. Henry Edwards was a farmer; William gave his profession as overseeing. He enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent sick at the time of enlistment, but was present with the company when it left the state. He was with the company until September 7th, 1862, when he was left sick at Lexington, Kentucky. He was captured there on October 17th, 1862. He was then described as 25 years old, 5’ 6” inches tall, with black eyes, brown hair, and light complexion. He was transferred from there to Louisville, Kentucky on November 7th, 1862, and then transferred from there to Vicksburg, Mississippi, on November 12th, 1862. He was received for exchange on board the Steamer “Metropolitan” at Vicksburg on December 4th, 1862. He died on January 9th, 1863 at Memphis, Tennessee, and is interred at Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee.[28]

Private David M. Truluck (also David M. Truelock, D. M. Trueluck, D. M. Trulluck) was born ca. 1841 in Florida. In 1860, he was living at the residence of father Arthur, along with his mother and three siblings, near Concord, Gadsden County, Florida. He enlisted for state service on September 4th, 1861 with Captain Wilk Call’s Concordia Infantry, and reenlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was absent on sick furlough at the time of enlistment, but was present with the company when it left the state, and remained with it until he was detached as a guard at Knoxville, Tennessee on April 15th, 1863. He returned to the company on April 30th, 1863, and was present with it until February 22nd, 1864, when he was sent to the hospital at Dalton, Georgia. He was captured at Resaca, Georgia, on May 15th, 1864, and sent to the military prison at Louisville, arriving there on May 20th, 1864. He was transferred from there on May 23rd to the military Prison at Alton, Illinois, arriving there on May 25th. He died of small pox while in captivity on February 25th, 1865, and is interred at the Confederate Cemetery at North Alton, Madison County, Illinois.

Private George W. Wamack (also George W. Warnack) was born ca. 1846. He enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His given age was 16 years. He was rejected by the Inspecting Officer on April 19th, 1862. The date and location of his death and his place of internment are unknown.

Private John W. Weakley (also John W. Weekly, John W. Weekley) was born ca. 1836 in Georgia. His family relocated from Georgia to Florida between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living near Concordia, Florida at the residence of his mother along with his younger brother Paul, younger brother Silas, and younger sister Amarintha. His occupation was given as farming. He enlisted on April 2nd, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was absent on a sick furlough at the time of his enlistment, but was with the company when it left the state. He was present with the company from that time until October 30th, 1863, when he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia. John returned to the company, and was present with it until he was wounded at Stone Mountain, Georgia. He was crippled by a gunshot wound to the right ankle, and discharged on July 22nd, 1864. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and paroled from there on May 16, 1865. He was described as being 5’6” tall, light hair, grey eyes, and light complexion. He married Eugenia (née Fare) at Bristol, Liberty County on February 28th, 1879. John applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension in 1887. John died on July 13th, 1892 at Liberty County, Florida, and is interred in the Rock Bluff Cemetery, Rock Bluff, Liberty County, Florida. After his death, Eugenia applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension for John’s service in 1900.

Private Paul Weakley (also Paul Weekly, Paul Meakley, Paul Weekley) was born June 23rd, 1839 at Decatur County, Georgia. His family relocated from Georgia to Florida between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living near Concordia, Florida at the residence of his mother along with his older brother John W., younger brother Silas, and younger sister Amarintha. His occupation was given as a laborer. He enlisted May 3rd, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He left the state with the company, and was present on all rolls until his capture at Missionary Ridge on November 25th, 1863. He was sent to the Military Prison at Louisville, Kentucky on December 6th, 1863, and arrived there on the following day. He was transferred from there to the Military Prison at Rock Island Barracks, Illinois, arriving there on December 9th, 1863. He was released from there under Oath of Allegiance on June 19th, 1865. At the time of his release, he was described as being 5’5.5” tall, fresh complexion, hazel eyes, dark hair, 26 years old. He stated Concord, Gadsden County, Florida as his residence. After the war, he married Sarah Addie (née Vickers) at Gadsden County on January 18, 1873. They had three daughters; Mary Margaret (1874), Lilla Melissa (1878), and Nora Jane (1881). Paul applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension for his service in 1904. Sarah died in 1913. Paul died May 28th, 1918, and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida.

Private Silas Weakley (also Silas Weakly, Silas Weekley, Silas Weekly) was born June 18th, 1841 at Decatur County, Georgia. His family relocated from Georgia to Florida between 1839 and 1841. In 1860, he was living near Concordia, Florida at the residence of his mother along with his older brothers John W and Paul, and younger sister Amarintha. His occupation was given as a laborer. He enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. He was present from the time of his enlistment until October 26th, 1862 when he was reported absent on a sick furlough. He had returned to the company by November 12rth, 1862, and was present with it until February 21st, 1864, when he was sent to the hospital at Dalton, Georgia. He was promoted to Corporal in April, 1864. He was wounded by gunshot through the knee, and furloughed to the hospital at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. He surrendered at Tallahassee, Florida on May 10, 1865 and paroled from there on May 16, 1865. He was described as being 5’6” tall, dark hair, black eyes, and dark complexion. He returned to Gadsden County, and resided near Gretna. He married Sarah Ann Elizabeth (née Vickers) at Gadsden County on August 21st, 1865. Silas applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension for his service. Silas died May 5th, 1910, and is interred at Providence Baptist Church Cemetery, Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida. After his death, Sarah applied for and was awarded a Florida Confederate pension for Silas’ service in 1910.

Private Alfred Whiddon (also Alford Washington Whiddon, Alfred Whidden, Alfred W. Whiddon) was born December 24th, 1823 at Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia. He married Ellafair Jane (née Barber) ca. 1850. In 1860, he was living near Bay Spring, Henry County, Alabama, with a Ellafair, four young children, and a 24-year-old farmer named Malcom Boey. At that time, Alfred was a farmer, claiming real estate valued at $1,200, and a personal value of $3,197. Alfred enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. At the time of enlistment, he was reported absent on detailed duty, but was present with the company when it left the state. He was detailed as a guard for the regimental wagons on September 5th, 1862. Beginning December 19th, 1862, he was again detached for duty as police at Knoxville, Tennessee and served in this role until April 30th, 1863. He was promoted to Corporal sometime between April 30th and July 9th, 1863; he was present with the company from April 30th, 1863 through February 1864. There is no further record of his service; however, he did survive the war, and returned to Henry County. Alfred died on December 16th, 1887, and is interred at the Smyrna Baptist Cemetery at Dothan, Houston County, Alabama.

Private George A. White (also George White, George H. White) was April 24th, 1844 near Vernon, Washington County, Florida. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence along with his mother and five siblings. He enlisted on August 29th, 1862 at Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia in Captain Love’s Company by Lieutenant Scott for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company until October 30th, 1862 when he was sent to the hospital at Knoxville, Tennessee. He returned to the company, but was reported absent without leave in Florida from January 15th through February 10th, 1863. He was present with the company from that point until early February, 1864 when he was sent to the hospital at Dalton, Georgia. He was captured near Nashville, Tennessee on December 16th, 1864. He was sent to the military prison at Louisville, Kentucky, arriving there on December 21st, 1864. He was transferred the same day to the military prison at Camp Douglas, Illinois, arriving there on December 24th, 1864. He was discharged from there on June 20th, 1865. His place of residence was given as Washington County, Florida. George died on December 19th, 1867 and is interred at the White Cemetery, Vernon, Washington County, Florida.

USS Maria Denning was an 870-ton side-wheel river steamer, built at Cincinnati in 1858 for commercial employment. She was purchased by the Navy in 1861 to be used as a transport on the Western Rivers. In addition to that duty, she also served as receiving ship at Cairo, Illinois, from November 1861 to April 1862. Maria Denning was transferred to the Army in December 1862 and was used as a U.S. Army Transport from then until April 1863. Image credit U.S. Naval Historical Center

Private Thomas J. White (also Thos. J. White) was born ca. 1833 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living near China Hill, Gadsden County, Florida with his wife and two young children. He enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His given age was 16 years. He was rejected by the Inspecting Officer on April 19th, 1862. The date and location of his death and his place of internment are unknown.

Private William N. Womack (also William Womack) was born ca. 1835 in Georgia. In 1860, he was living at his father’s residence near Concord, Gadsden County Florida with eight younger siblings. His father claimed farming as his profession, and was a man of some means. William enlisted on March 26, 1862 at Rico’s Bluff, Liberty County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was promoted to 5th Sergeant in mid-1862, then to 2nd sergeant on April 10th, 1863. He was again promoted to 1st Sergeant late in 1863. He was present with the company until October 10th, 1863, when he was sent to the hospital at Chickamauga, Georgia. There are no further records of his service, and whether he survived the war. The date and location of his death and his place of internment are unknown.

Private John J. Wood was born ca. 1810 at Jefferson County, Georgia. In 1860, he resided near Marianna, Jackson County, Florida with his wife, two daughters, and a young male ward. He gave his profession as farming. He enlisted on March 18, 1862 at Chattahoochee, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. At the time of his enlistment, he was absent on sick furlough, but was with the company when it left the state. He was left sick in a hospital at Lexington, Kentucky on September 7th, 1862, and captured by Federal forces shortly thereafter. He was paroled and received on board the steamer “Maria Denning” for exchanged at Vicksburg, Mississippi on November 15th, 1862. He was discharged under Surgeon’s Certificate at Jackson, Mississippi on November 21st, 1862, being determined to have suffered under the rigors of imprisonment and his age, and being as a result too feeble for continued military service. At the time of discharge, he was described as being 6’ 1/2” tall, grey hair, grey eyes, and florid complexion. Whether he survived the war is unknown, as are the date and location of his death and his place of internment.

Private John Wry was born ca. 1802. He enlisted on March 12th, 1862 at Quincy, Gadsden County, Florida in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Cross for a period of 3 years. His given age was 60 years. He was rejected by the Inspecting Officer on April 19th, 1862. The date and location of his death and his place of internment are unknown

Private William Young enlisted on September 22, 1862 at Frankfort, Kentucky in Captain Love’s Company by Captain Love for a period of 3 years. He was present with the company from time of enlistment through February 1864. Whether he survived the war is unknown, as are the date and location of his death and his place of internment.




Bibliography[edit]

  • United States War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Government Printing Office,Washington, D.C.
  • Robertson, Fred L. (Compiler) (1903). Soldiers of Florida in the Seminole, Civil and Spanish-American Wars. Democrat Book and Job Print, Live Oak, Florida.
  • Hartman, David W. (1995). Biographical Rosters of Florida’s Confederate and Union Soldiers, 1861-1865: (Volume 2; 5th Florida Infantry – 8th Florida Infantry). Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. ISBN 1568372884.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 251: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • Sheppard, Jonathan C. (2012). By the Noble Daring of Her Sons: The Florida Brigade of the Army of Tennessee. University of Alabama Press. p. 319. ISBN 0817317074.
  • Scaif, James Verner (1919). Local Designations of Confederate Troops. Total 3974. Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 225: Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • National Archives and Records Service. Microcopy No. 653: 1860 Federal Population Census - Part 4.
  • Swart, Stanley L. "The Military Examination Board in the Civil War: A Case Study". Civil War History, Volume 16 Number 3, September 1970. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  • Florida Department of Military Affairs (1903). Florida Militia Muster Rolls Seminole Indian Wars; Special Archives Publication Number 74, Volume 8. George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida Digital Collection.
  • Debow, J.B.D., editor (1857). Debow's Review: Agricultural, Commercial, Industrial Progress and Resources, Volume 22, -Third Series, Volume II. Washington City and New Orleans.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  • King, William L. (1872). The Newspaper Press of Charleston, S.C.: A Chronological and Biographical History, Embracing a Period of One Hundred and Forty Years. Edward Perry, (Bookpress) 149 Meeting Street, Charleston, S.C.
  • Reports and Resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina Passed at the Annual Session of 1849. I. C. Morgan, State Printer; Columbia, South Carolina. 1849. p. 747.
  • Journal of the Proceedings of the Convention of the People of Florida: Begun and Held at the Capitol in the City of Tallahassee [sic], on Thursday, January 3, AD, Part 1861. Office of the Floridian and Journal, Tallahassee; Dyke and Carlisle. 1861. p. 124.
  • Biographical Cyclopedia of Representative Men of Maryland and the District of Columbia. National Biographical and Publishing Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 1879. p. 872.
  • Brice, Marshall M. (1967). The Stonewall Brigade Band. McClure Printing, Verona, Virginia. p. 213.
  • Seddon, James A. (1863). Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States, 1863. J. W Randolph, 121 Main Street, Richmond, Virginia.
  • Goodnite, Jason. "Cooking on Campaign" (PDF). 26th North Carolina Regiment. Retrieved August 4, 2016.
  • National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 258: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations Raised Directly by the Confederate Government. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  • Webb, Wanton S. (1885). Webb’s Historical, Industrial and Biographical Florida, Part 1. W. S. Webb & Co., New York. p. 202.
  • Rubenstein, Major David A. "A Study of the Medical Support to the Union and Confederate Armies during the Battle of Chickamauga: Lessons and Implications for Today's U.S. Army Medical Department Leaders". Master’s Thesis presented to U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1990. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g United States War Department. The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Government Printing Office,Washington, D.C.
  2. ^ Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774 – Present
  3. ^ Robertson, Fred L. (Compiler) (1903). Soldiers of Florida in the Seminole, Civil and Spanish-American Wars. Democrat Book and Job Print, Live Oak, Florida.
  4. ^ Hartman, David W. (1995). Biographical Rosters of Florida’s Confederate and Union Soldiers, 1861-1865: (Volume 2; 5th Florida Infantry – 8th Florida Infantry). Broadfoot Publishing Company, Wilmington, North Carolina. ISBN 1568372884.
  5. ^ a b c d National Archives and Records Service (1957). Microcopy No. 251: Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Florida. General Services Administration, Washington, D.C.
  6. ^ a b c Sheppard, Jonathan C. (2012). By the Noble Daring of Her Sons: The Florida Brigade of the Army of Tennessee. University of Alabama Press. p. 319. ISBN 0817317074.
  7. ^ Scaif, James Verner (1919). Local Designations of Confederate Troops. Total 3974. Cornell University Library, Ithaca, New York.
  8. ^ General Evans, Clement A. (editor). Confederate Military History, Volume XI (Florida and Texas). Confederate Publishing Company, Atlanta, Georgia. (Pages 175-176)
  9. ^ The documents for all men of company B paroled at Durham would bear the same remark regarding the formation of Company D of the consolidated 1st Florida Infantry Regiment.
  10. ^ National Park Service, American Battlefield Protection Program
  11. ^ Encyclopedia Virginia
  12. ^ The "1st Sergeant" in an American Civil War infantry company had two additional titles - "Orderly sergeant", and "Covering Sergeant." "1st Sergeant" pertains to his seniority in the company, "Orderly Sergeant" pertains to his administrative function, and "Covering Sergeant" pertains to his combat function. In the case of the latter, "The first sergeant in the rear rank, touching 'with the left elbow and covering the captain. In the manœuvres he will be denominated "covering sergeant", or right guide of the company. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)" and "A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer, Captain Thomas Wilhelm (1881)"
  13. ^ Unlike the "1st Sergeant", who was the senior non-commissioned officer in the company, Sergeants identified as "2nd", "3rd", "4th", or "5th" was not an indication of their respective seniority. The sergeants were file closers while the company was in line of battle; their "number" indicated their position and duties. The 2nd Sergeant was opposite the second file from the left of the company. In the manoeuvres he is called the Left Guide of the company. The 3rd Sergeant was opposite the second file from the right of the second platoon. The 4th Sergeant was opposite the second file from the left of the first platoon. The 5th Sergeant was opposite the second file from the right of the first platoon. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)" and "A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer, Captain Thomas Wilhelm (1881)"
  14. ^ Corporals were numbered "1st", "2nd", "3rd", or "4th"; as was the case with Sergeants (except 1st Sergeant), this numbering was not an indication of their respective seniority. Unlike the sergeants, the corporals' number was a function of individual height, for "the corporals will be posted in the front rank, and on the right and left of platoons, according to height; the tallest corporal and the tallest [enlisted] man will form the first file, the second two tallest men will form the second file, and so on to the last file, which will be composed of shortest corporal and the shortest [enlisted] man. (See "Hardee's Rifle and Light Infantry Tactics, Brevet Lieut.-Colonel W. J. Hardee (1855)"
  15. ^ During the Civil War, military leaders with the Union and the Confederacy relied on military musicians to entertain troops, position troops in battle, and stir them on to victory — some actually performing concerts in forward positions during the fighting. Musicians enjoyed no more privileges than the common soldier. Initially, the rank of "musician" in Northern armies was comparable to that of private and was viewed negatively by many. In the South, musicians were generally assigned a somewhat more valuable status and were paid twelve dollars a month, one dollar more than a private. See "About Army Bands" at http://www.goarmy.com/band/about-army-bands/history.html
  16. ^ An inguinal hernia occurs when the intestines or fat from the abdomen bulge through the lower abdominal wall into the inguinal, or groin, area.
  17. ^ (Essentially, a “photographer”. The daguerreotype was the first commercially successful photographic process (1839-1860) in the history of photography. Named after the inventor, Louis Jacques Mandé Daguerre, each daguerreotype is a unique image on a silvered copper plate. In the early 1850s, “daguerreian artist” could connote a daguerreotypist or producer of early paper formats – mainly salted paper prints. By the late 1850s and early 1860s, a daguerreian artist could have been a purveyor of any combination of daguerrotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, i.e., all types of photographs. See “2000. Palmquist, Peter E., & Kailbourn, Thomas R. “Pioneeer Photographers of the Far West: A Biographical Dictionary, 1840-1865”. Stanford University Press, Redwood City, California. 679 p. ISBN 9780804738835”).
  18. ^ Captain Gee’s company would be taken into Confederate service as Company G, 1st Florida Infantry.
  19. ^ Originally, the term "teamster" referred to a person who drove a team of draft animals, usually a wagon drawn by oxen, horses, or mules. This term was common by the time of the Mexican–American War (1848) and the Indian Wars throughout the 19th and early 20th centuries on the American frontier.
  20. ^ Eastern Illinois University, accessed 2015-11-21
  21. ^ National Park Service, Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery Columbus, Ohio
  22. ^ In 1860, the entire Jewish population of Gadsden and Jackson counties consisted of no more than fifteen men, women, and children. Samuel’s brother, Philip, had remained behind in Quincy where his household included another Bavarian, Simon Fleishman, born in 1840. Ferdinand A. and Fannie Fleishman, their son Samuel, and another man named Benjamin Fleishman, had also established themselves as merchants in Quincy. While no clear evidence exists, the household information from census records and typical family migration patterns make it reasonable to conclude that most, if not all of these Fleishmans from Bavaria, were related. Simon Fleishman, who was living with Philip in 1860, enlisted in Company B of the Sixth Florida Infantry as a private in March 1862. Benjamin A. Fleishman, also of Quincy, enlisted as a private in the same company in June 1862. Both Simon and Benjamin were cited for distinguished service. Simon was captured at Missionary Ridge in November 1863 and was confined in the Union prison at Rock Island, Illinois, until he swore an oath of allegiance in June 1865. Benjamin Fleishman was wounded at Chickamauga, Georgia, in September 1863 and was captured at Nashville in December 1864. Benjamin was confined in the Union prison at Camp Chase, Ohio, until he was released after swearing allegiance in May 1865. Ibid., II, 592; Civil War Service Records. See "2005. Bauman, Mark K. “SOUTHERN JEWISH HISTORY Journal of the Southern Jewish Historical Society, Volume 8”. Southern Jewish Historical Society. 50 pps."
  23. ^ Valvular heart disease is any disease process involving one or more of the four valves of the heart (the aortic and mitral valves on the left and the pulmonary and tricuspid valves on the right). These conditions occur largely as a consequence of aging, but may also be the result of congenital (inborn) abnormalities or specific disease or physiologic processes including rheumatic heart disease and pregnancy. See “Braunwald's Heart Disease E-Book: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine”
  24. ^ smallpox
  25. ^ The Assistant Commissary of Subsistence (ACS) role was administrative. The commissary of subsistence for the regiment was responsible for all subsistence supplies including the acquisition, storage and issuance of all food to the soldiers, bakery and hospital and for the sales of subsistence stores to commissioned officers. The commissary of subsistence was also responsible for keeping a record of the monthly returns of provisions received and issued, paid for and from whom they were acquired called the Commissary’s Book. The commissary of subsistence was also responsible for keeping the Subsistence Account Book which recorded all sales of subsistence goods to the commissioned officers assigned to the regiment.
  26. ^ Galvanized Yankees was a term from the American Civil War denoting former Confederate prisoners of war who swore allegiance to the United States and joined the Union Army. Approximately 5,600 former Confederate soldiers enlisted into six regiments of "United States Volunteers". Two of these Regiments, the 2nd and 3rd U.S. Volunteer Infantry, were authorized to be raised at the Rock Island prisoner of war camp in October, 1864. See “Galvanized Yankees”.
  27. ^ Joel Strickland was not eligible for a U.S pension as a “galvanized yankee”. His Confederate pension was awarded for service in Company B, 6th Florida Infantry. His application states that he was captured at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1864, and that he was released from Rock Island in 1865. There is no mention of his enlistment into the U.S. Army being the cause for his release, likely because such knowledge would have invalidated his application.
  28. ^ Matilda (née Cross) Tomberlin applied for a Florida Confederate Widow’s pension in 1934, claiming that she married William on October 5th, 1878 at Gadsden County, Florida, and that he died on January 4th, 1889 at Gadsden County, Florida. While her application contains a number of factual details about the regiment, the specifics of William’s service are conspicuously absent, and witnesses to both his service and their marriage were no longer living. Her application was not substantiated by any official documentation, and was rejected by the state.

External links[edit]