Concerned Christians

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Monte Kim Miller formed a group known as the Concerned Christians in Colorado, during the 1980s. Created to combat New Age religious movements and anti-Christian sentiment, it has shifted to more of an apocalyptic Christian movement as the group adopted the less mainstream views of the millennium held by Miller.[1]

Beliefs and Values[edit]

The Concerned Christians believe that the Fall of the Soviet Union in 1991 signaled “the time of the end.” They interpret many biblical passages, regarding the apocalypse, through the lens of political events in world history. It is stated that they believe that the office of the United States President is the seat of the Antichrist. For example, in what is titled The Seed of Abraham, the group reports that Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States, was the archetypal Antichrist and helped build the “Babylonian nation that leads the entire world astray.” They see American patriotism as a “foolish” compromise to their Christian beliefs. Founder, Monte “Kim” Miller, proclaimed that he was “the Prophet of the Lord,” and that God spoke through his mouth.[2]

Arrest and deportation by Israeli authorities[edit]

Between 60 and 80 members of the group disappeared from their homes and jobs in Colorado in October 1998 and were the subject of a search. On January 3, 1999, they gained notoriety when they were arrested and deported from Israel as part of an Israeli effort to protect the Al-Aqsa mosque from extremist Christian groups, codenamed "Operation Walk on Water". According to Israeli police, the Concerned Christians were one of several independent groups who believed it must be destroyed to facilitate the return of Jesus Christ. The group members said that they were law-abiding religious pilgrims there to await the return of Jesus but had no plans to participate in any illegal activity.[3][4]

The group is said to currently reside in Greece or the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area and its potential threat level has since been disputed.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b B.A. Robinson (2002-02-20). "The "Concerned Christians" Cult – Originally of Denver CO". Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance. Retrieved 2008-05-28. 
  2. ^ "Kim Miller Concerned Christians - Unsealing Bible Prophecy". www.kimmillerconcernedchristians.com. Retrieved 2016-02-22. 
  3. ^ "Cult members deported from Israel". BBC. 1999-01-09. Retrieved 2008-05-28. 
  4. ^ "Apocalyptic Christians detained in Israel for alleged violence plot". CNN. 1999-01-03. Archived from the original on July 18, 2007. Retrieved 2008-05-28. 

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