Conecuh County, Alabama

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Conecuh County, Alabama
Conecuh County Government Center May 2013 2.jpg
The Conecuh County Government Center in Evergreen
Map of Alabama highlighting Conecuh County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the United States highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Founded February 13, 1818
Seat Evergreen
Largest city Evergreen
Area
 • Total 853 sq mi (2,209 km2)
 • Land 850 sq mi (2,201 km2)
 • Water 2.6 sq mi (7 km2), 0.3%
Population
 • (2010) 13,228
 • Density 16/sq mi (6/km²)
Congressional district 2nd
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5

Footnotes:  

  • County Number 21 on Alabama Licence Plates

Conecuh County (kʌ'nɛkə) [p] is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 13,228.[1] Its county seat is Evergreen, Alabama.[2] Its name is believed to be derived from a Creek Indian term meaning "land of cane."

History[edit]

The areas along the rivers had been used by varying cultures of indigenous peoples for thousands of years. French and Spanish explorers encountered the historic Creek Indians. Later, British colonial traders developed relationships with the Creek, and several married high-status Creek women. As the tribe has a matrilineal system, children are considered born into their mother's clan and take their status from her family.

During the American Revolutionary War, the Upper Creek chief Alexander McGillvray (whose father was Scots) allied with the British, as he hoped to stop colonial American encroachment. Commissioned a colonel, he used Jean-Antoine Le Clerc, a French adventurer who lived with the Creek for 20 years, as his war chief to lead Creek warriors.

Conecuh County was established by European Americans on February 13, 1818. Some of its territory was taken in 1868 by the state legislature during the Reconstruction era to establish Escambia County. In the coastal plain, it was an area of plantations and cotton cultivation in the nineteenth century. It is still quite rural. Thousands of blacks left after 1940 in the Second Great Migration, especially for jobs in industry on the West Coast.

The county was declared a disaster area in September 1979, due to damage from Hurricane Frederic.

The county is mentioned as the birthplace of Theodore Bagwell in the hit television series Prison Break.

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 853 square miles (2,210 km2), of which 850 square miles (2,200 km2) is land and 2.6 square miles (6.7 km2) (0.3%) is water.[3]

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 5,713
1830 7,444 30.3%
1840 8,197 10.1%
1850 9,322 13.7%
1860 11,311 21.3%
1870 9,574 −15.4%
1880 12,605 31.7%
1890 14,594 15.8%
1900 17,514 20.0%
1910 21,433 22.4%
1920 24,593 14.7%
1930 25,429 3.4%
1940 25,489 0.2%
1950 21,776 −14.6%
1960 17,762 −18.4%
1970 15,645 −11.9%
1980 15,884 1.5%
1990 14,054 −11.5%
2000 14,089 0.2%
2010 13,228 −6.1%
Est. 2014 12,670 [4] −4.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2014[1]

2010[edit]

Whereas according to the 2010 U.S. Census Bureau:

2000[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 14,089 people, 5,792 households, and 3,938 families residing in the county. The population density was 17 people per square mile (6/km2). There were 7,265 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 55.40% White, 43.55% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.09% from other races, and 0.60% from two or more races. 0.72% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 5,792 households out of which 30.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.70% were married couples living together, 16.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.00% were non-families. 30.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.90% under the age of 18, 8.30% from 18 to 24, 25.80% from 25 to 44, 24.30% from 45 to 64, and 15.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 89.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $22,111, and the median income for a family was $31,424. Males had a median income of $28,115 versus $19,350 for females. The per capita income for the county was $12,964. About 21.70% of families and 26.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.10% of those under age 18 and 28.90% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

City[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Historic sites[edit]

Conecuh County has three sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Asa Johnston Farmhouse, Louisville and Nashville Depot, and New Evergreen Commercial Historic District.[10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved August 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved August 22, 2015. 
  7. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 24, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 22, 2015. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved August 22, 2015. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010. 

Notes[edit]

  [p] - The name "Conecuh" is pronounced "cah-Neck-ah" emphasizing the second syllable.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°25′32″N 86°59′38″W / 31.42556°N 86.99389°W / 31.42556; -86.99389