Coney Island (Cincinnati, Ohio)

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Coney Island
Coney Island Cincinnati logo.svg
LocationCincinnati, Ohio, United States
Coordinates39°03′15″N 84°25′12″W / 39.054268°N 84.420040°W / 39.054268; -84.420040Coordinates: 39°03′15″N 84°25′12″W / 39.054268°N 84.420040°W / 39.054268; -84.420040
OwnerBrenda Walker
Opened1870
Previous namesParker's Grove (1870–1885)
Ohio Grove, The Coney Island of the West (1886)
Coney Island (1887–1975)
Old Coney (1976–1985)
Coney Island (1985–)
Operating seasonMay–September
(water park)
November–January
(Christmas Nights of Lights)
Attractions
Total5
WebsiteConey Island
StatusOperating

Coney Island is a small water park located on the banks of the Ohio River in Cincinnati, Ohio, approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of the downtown area in Anderson Township. The park sits directly adjacent to Riverbend Music Center and Belterra Park. Beginning in 1870, the original owner called the area Parker's Grove, which was later renamed Ohio Grove, The Coney Island of the West after the Ohio Grove Corporation purchased the park in 1886. The name was shortened to Coney Island the following season. Growth over the years spawned dozens of rides and attractions which led to its popularity as an amusement destination.

Coney Island was sold to Taft Broadcasting in 1969 with intentions to move the park to a new, larger destination away from frequent flooding. The new park opened as Kings Island in 1972, although Coney Island's Sunlite Pool remained opened. Rides eventually returned, and additional investments and improvements were made to the Sunlite Pool area. These changes, along with the opening of the nearby Riverbend Music Center in 1984, allowed the park's attendance and profitability to recover. In 2019, Coney Island focused its operations exclusively on its water park amenities and removed other amusement rides.

History[edit]

Coney Island's founding dates back to 1867 when apple-farmer James Parker purchased approximately 20 acres (0.081 km2) of land along the shores of the Ohio River.[1] Parker soon realized the popularity of the farm's location, and that renting it out was more profitable than his apple orchard. He named it Parker's Grove and eventually added a dining hall, dancing hall, and bowling alley. He later sold the land in 1886 for $17,500 to a company called Ohio Grove Corporation headed by two steamboat captains. For the opening on June 21, 1886, the name was officially changed to "Ohio Grove, The Coney Island of the West" in an effort to link the park with the famous New York destination. With its riverfront location, the riverboat became the most popular method of transportation for park visitors. In 1887, "Ohio Grove" was completely dropped from the name as the park became known simply as "Coney Island".[2]

Moonlite Gardens at Coney Island

Over the years, Coney Island became a full-fledged amusement park, complete with rides and carnival games. Notable additions included the first and second Island Queen in 1896 and 1925, respectively, Moonlite Gardens dance pavilion and Sunlite Pool swimming pool in 1925 (although Sunlite Pool wouldn't be identified as such until 1928), the Wildcat and Twister wooden roller coasters in 1926, the Land of Oz children's section in 1934, and the Shooting Star roller coaster (a renovation of the former Clipper roller coaster) in 1947.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

Coney Island became a Cincinnati institution. However, the park's proximity to the river made it prone to frequent flooding. In 1968, park management entered into talks with Taft Broadcasting for the purpose of developing a new park on higher ground. Taft responded by buying Coney Island outright in 1969, and construction began the following year on a new site located in Deerfield Township of Warren County 25 miles (40 km) north of Cincinnati along Interstate 71. Coney Island closed its amusements on September 6, 1971, as most of its rides were moved to the newly completed Kings Island theme park.

After Kings Island opened in 1972, Taft Broadcasting intended to sell Coney Island's land for redevelopment. However, with the company's decision to open another theme park in Virginia (Kings Dominion) and its acquisition of Carowinds on the North Carolina-South Carolina border, the property's redevelopment became a low priority. Less than two years after closing, Coney Island reopened permanently in 1973. The park was only a shadow of its former self but still featured several popular attractions. The Sunlite Pool — still the largest recirculating swimming pool in the world[9] — was one of those attractions that helped Coney Island remain a popular summertime destination.

The park donated 15 acres (61,000 m2) of land for the construction of Riverbend Music Center which opened in 1984. The land was the former location of the Wildcat and Shooting Star roller coasters. The Riverbend amphitheater serves as the summer home of the Cincinnati Symphony and Pops Orchestras, as well as a concert venue for other musical acts. In 1991, Coney Island was purchased by Cincinnati businessman Ronald Walker. No longer held back by a corporate entity, management has been able to restore Coney Island as a traditional amusement park with familiar rides such as the "Tilt-A-Whirl", bumper cars, carnival games and musical shows.[10]

Coney Island announced plans to remove all amusement rides from the park on September 21, 2019, but will continue to operate as a water park featuring the Sunlite Pool and other water-related attractions.[11] The decision was based on attendance, consumer feedback, and rising costs associated with maintaining ride operation.[12][13]

Sunlite Water Adventure Slides and Attractions[edit]

Ride Year Opened Description
The Twister 2009 The Twister is the replacement of the Zoom Flume. The Twister is a four-slide attraction. Two are body slides, and the other two are double or single tubes. They are not fully enclosed. They end in a four-foot pool. The Twister is named after The Twister wooden roller coaster that operated at the park from 1926 through 1936.[14]
Cannonball Cove 2019 It is three-foot diving boards or cannonball on a single-pool section near the main Sunlite Water Adventure main pool and Twister and this attraction replaced the Pipeline Plunge. In addition, the diving boards were located in the Sunlite Water Adventure main pool since they opened in the 20th century and they were relocated to the former Pipeline Plunge site and became Cannonball Cove due to Hamilton County's new rule from last year about Diving Boards being in a pool separate from the main pool.
Cyclone 2006 The Cyclone is a yellow enclosed slide that enters a pool near the deep end. It is four feet deep.
Silver Bullet 1945 This speed slide splashes down right in the heart of Sunlite Pool.
Paddle Boats Unknown Pedal Boats; located on Lake Como.

Former attractions (Pre-1972)[edit]

List of Former Attractions Pre-1972
Name Manufacturer (Model) Opened Closed Description
Bat Cave (Dark Ride) 1966 1967 Re-theme of The Spook. Designed by Arrow Development.[15] Replaced with Haunted House.[16]
Bluebeard's Castle (Funhouse) 1927 Closed Funhouse with stunts including a tilted room with the walls, ceiling, and floor at different angles. Facade included two over-sized heads, with one as the entrance and the other as the exit. Attraction was a partnership between Frank Thomas and George Sinclair.[17]
Brain Trust (Funhouse) 1930s Closed Located on the Mall.[18]
Calypso Mack Rides (Calypso) 1963 1965 Spinning flat ride imported from Germany. Covered with 5,500 red and white lights.[19] Replaced by Cloud 9.
Carousel Philadelphia Toboggan Company (Carousel) 1926 1971 Classic carousel with 48 hand-carved wooden horses and two chariots.[20] Originally opened in building that had housed the park's previous carousel before being relocated within the park to a newer building designed by the Philadelphia Toboggan Company in 1932.[4][21] Carousel #79 from manufacturer.[20] Originally painted with more than 20,000 sheets of 23-karat (96%) gold and 1,000 sheets of sterling silver.[22] A 68-year-old woman fell from the ride in 1947 and died.[23] Completely refurbished in 1969 at a cost of $50,000.[24][25] Relocated to Kings Island as Carousel, today known as Grand Carousel.[20][22] Ride's structure remained in place until it was demolished in 1985.[26]
Caterpillar (Caterpillar) 1924 Closed Classic Caterpillar attraction. Installed by J.J. Schmid with a five year lease.[27]
Chase Me (Kiddie Auto) 1934 Closed Children's ride located in the Land of Oz. Included vehicles themed to automobiles, fire engines, and police cars.[28]
Circle Swing Harry Traver and Rudyard S. Uzzell (Circle Swing) 1900s Closed - 1944 or later Large circle swing originally built on a small island in Lake Como. Identified under various names, including Circle Swing, The Rockets, and Flying Tigers.[29] Originally had six wicker basket ride vehicles which were replaced with small wooden airplanes in the 1920s.[30][31] Relocated within park in 1926.[32] Airplanes replaced with rockets (built in-house) for 1938 season.[33] Rockets repainted to resemble Flying Tigers airplanes for 1942 season.[29][34]
Clipper Philadelphia Toboggan Company(Wooden Coaster) 1937 1946 A twisted wooden roller coaster designed by Herbert Schmeck. Skyrocket's machinery was saved for use on this ride.[35] Featured an art deco-style loading station.[36] Nicknamed Greased Lightning.[37] Segments of the ride, including its loading station, lift, and final spiral helix, were retained for the construction of Shooting Star.[38][39]
Cloud 9 Chance Rides (Trabant) 1966 Closed Trabant attraction that replaced Calypso.[40]
Coney Island and Lake Como Railroad Chance Rides (Miniature Railway) 1964 1971 Miniature railway over Lake Como on a 462-foot (141 m) trestle and into the adjoining woods.[41] Included settler and Native American figurines created by Special Effects Company of Morrison, Colorado.[42] Victorian-style station designed by University of Cincinnati graduate Darrel Daniels.[41] Engines named after Mad Anthony Wayne (#34) and George Rogers Clark (#35).[42] Trains were stored overnight in the ride's two tunnels. $10,000 of new effects added for 1966 season, including a grizzly bear, a fort, and additional Native American figurines.[15] After ride closed, #34 was relocated to World of Golf in Florence, Kentucky and later Oil Ranch in Hockley, Texas. #35 eventually found its way to Guntown Mountain Railroad near Mammoth Cave, Kentucky before being put in storage at Beech Bend Park.[43]
Crazy Orbit Hrubetz (Round-Up) 1960 Closed A spinning flat ride that tilted riders upward.[44]
Cuddle Up Philadelphia Toboggan Company (Cuddle Up) 1930 1971 A spinning flat ride.[45] Relocated to Kings Island.[46]
Devil's Dips T.M. Harton Company (Wooden Coaster) 1913 Closed Opening delayed until June 22, 1913 due to large flood. Twisted, figure-eight style roller coaster.[47]
Devil's Kitchen (Funhouse) 1927 Closed Funhouse. Replaced Noah's Ark.
Dip the Dips (1) T.M. Harton Company (Wooden Coaster) 1911 1918 Roller coaster built by T.M. Harton.[48] Operated by the Coney Island Dips Co.[49]
Dip the Dips (2) T.M. Harton Company

(Wooden Coaster)

1918 1925 Roller Coaster built by T.M. Harton that replaced the previous coaster of the same name.[50] Reconstructed with a higher hill and more dips in the early 1920s.[51] Replaced by Twister.[4]
Dodgem (Bumper Cars) 1920s 1971 Standard bumper-car attraction. Also referred to as Skooter.[52] Originally owned by A.H. Light of Cincinnati and located in a dome-shaped structure built by John A. Miller of Miller and Baker.[51] Housed in the same structure as Cuddle Up and The Whip. New cars added in 1967.[53] Relocated to Kings Island.
Doodle Bug (Children's Ride) Unknown Unknown Children's ride in the Land of Oz.[54]
Ferris Wheel Eli Bridge Company (Ferris Wheel) 1925 Closed (1937 or later)[52] No. 16 model Ferris Wheel with sixteen carriages.[32]
Figure 8 (Wooden Coaster) 1900s 1918 Roller coaster built by T.M. Harton.[55]
Flying American (Ferris Wheel) 1888 Closed 24-foot tall Ferris Wheel with six carriages. Constructed of wood and iron. Operated by Albert Heninchen, who disassembled the ride in the off-season and operated it inside a swim club in the city.[56]
Flying Scooter Bisch-Rocco (Flying Scooters) 1940 1971 A spinning ride with suspended cars that riders could control.[34] New cars added to ride in 1960.[44] Relocated to Kings Island (1972–2004) and later to Carowinds (2005-Present).[57]
Galaxi S.D.C. (Galaxi) 1970 1971 A compact Galaxi steel roller coaster. Relocated to Kings Island (1972–1978) as Bavarian Beetle.
Giggler 1908 Closed Enclosed ride with eccentric motion.[58]
Goofy House (Funhouse) <=1932 Closed Funhouse with a castle facade.[59] Replaced Morro Castle.[18] Rethemed into Streets of Paris by Ernest Anderson.[60]
Haunted House (Dark Ride) 1968 1971 Dark ride that replaced Bat Cave. Created by Coney and Richard Harsley.[16] Updated in 1969 with new $10,000 sound system and audio.[61]
Haunted Swing, The (Madhouse) 1890s Closed An "illusion" ride where people would enter a small building and get on a swing. The building revolved around the swing, creating the illusion that the guests had inverted.[62]
Hegler Coaster (Wooden Coaster) 1880s Closed Small wooden roller coaster, comparable to those at Coney Island. Named after park president J.D. Hegler and possibly built under the La Marcus Thompson patents.[63] Enlarged for the 1888 season.[64]
Helicopter Allan Herschell 1960 1971 Children's ride with miniature helicopters.[44] Helicopters replaced with large kangaroos in 1967.[53] Ride relocated to Kings Island as Kikki Kangaroo.
Hell and Back (Funhouse) 1930s Closed Designed and built by Langdon McCormick. One effect was a room that appeared to be on fire. The facade was given "demonical lighting effects" at night. Located across the Mall from Goofy House.[18]
House of Mysteries (Funhouse) 1935 Closed Funhouse.[60]
Indian Mystery (Funhouse) 1956 1956 Funhouse with Native American theming. Replaced the Mirror Maze.[65] Replaced by Scrambler.[66]
Jack and Jill (Slide) 1929 1932 Spiraling slide that passengers rode down on woven mats. Passengers rode to the top on escalator seats.[67] Slide removed after many park guests had sustained injuries on it, including George Schott's daughter.[21]
Jolly Caterpillar 1960 Closed Children's ride with a "bucking" action as the ride traveled in a circle.[44]
Jungle, The (Funhouse) 1930s Closed (1938 or earlier) Funhouse located on the Mall.[18] Designed by Ernest Anderson and featured a jungle motif and sounds.[60] Building used for The Coney Dog, Pony, and Monkey Circus in 1939.[8]
Junior Turnpike (Miniature Turnpike) 1957 Closed Miniature version of the larger Turnpike, added into the Land of Oz.[68]
Kinder Karousel (Carousel) 1962 Closed Carousel with automobiles and motorcycles. Imported from Germany.[69] Scenes around outside repainted in 1967.[53]
Laff-in-the-Dark Traver Engineering (Dark Ride) 1932 1960 Classic dark ride with small, powered cars from Traver Engineering and a building designed by Philadelphia Toboggan Company. The 850-foot (260 m) track included stunts like a skeleton in a coffin, a jumping lion, a dancing girl, and the devil.[59]
Leaping Lena Allan Herschell Company 1930 Closed 62-foot circular ride with 12 small racing cars. "Drivers" could steer their cars to avoid or hit bumps by moving into or away from the center of the ride. The attraction was likely owned by a concessionaire and only remained at the park for one or two season.[70]
Lindy Loop Spillman Manufacturing Company 1930 Closed Caterpillar type ride with the tunnel removed, swinging cars, and seats that faced each other.[70]
Little Dipper (Wooden Coaster) 19?? 19?? Roller coaster
Log Flume Arrow Development (Log flume) 1968 1971 Log flume ride marketed as park's most expensive addition ever at $500,000.[71] Relocated to Kings Island as Kings Mill Log Flume. The ride was partially rebuilt for the 2001 season and is now known as Race For Your Life Charlie Brown.
Loop-the-Loop Spillman Engineering Company 1930s Closed Caged ride where passengers would swing back-and-forth until they were able to complete a full loop around the structure.[28]
Lost River Philadelphia Toboggan Company (Shoot-the-Chute) 1928 1971 Originally known as The Cascades. Shoot-the-chute ride that started with a dark, winding tunnel with illuminated scenes before going up a hill and down a curving drop into a pool of water. Facade included a windmill and large artificial facade. The ride was similar to but larger than the former Mystic Mill Chutes.[72] Ride renovated and renamed to Lost River in 1941. A new facade was built and the drop was removed, but due to lack of popularity a new, larger drop was added in 1942.[73][74]
Mirror Maze (Funhouse) 1947 1955 Re-theme of The Show Boat. Included new stunts and a screened-in skirt-blower-upper gag.[75] Replaced by Indian Mystery.[65]
Monster Eyerly Aircraft Company (Monster) 1968 1971 Traditional "Octopus" ride that spins in three different circles at the same time. While it quickly raises and lowers riders as their cars continue to spin. Replaced the penny arcade. Relocated to Kings Island and now known as Monster.[76]
Moon Rocket Spillman Engineering Corp. 1942 1946 Circular spinning ride.[34] Replaced with Caterpillar.[75]
Morro Castle (Funhouse) 1930s Closed First of many new funhouses built at Coney Island in the 1930s. Exterior covered with minarets. Replaced by Goofy House.[18]
Mystic Mill Chute (Shoot the Chutes / Old Mill) 1922 1931 Combination shoot the chutes and Old Mill ride built by George Sinclair and Frank Thomas. Included a large windmill on top and small wooden boats propelled through tunnels by a large paddle wheel. Featured a roller coaster style ending with a chain lift hill and a drop into water.[31] Ride removed several years after The Cascades was built when it could no longer contend with the newer, larger attraction.[77]
Noah's Ark (Funhouse) 1926 1927 Funhouse themed to Biblical story of Noah's Ark. Owned by Charles McDonald. Included large rocking ship with a giraffe, elephant, and Noah looking out its windows.[78] Replaced by Devil's Kitchen.
Old '99 Chance Rides (Miniature Train) 1969 Closed Miniature train for children.[25]
Olympic Bobs Chance Rides (Olympic Bobs) 1968 1969 A Bayern Kurve style flat ride that accelerated guests around an angled track at high speeds.[79]
Pony Express (Pony Carts) 1934 Closed Children's ride located in the Land of Oz.[28]
Rotor (Rotor) 1955 Closed A stick-to-the-walls spinning flat ride. Attained a speed of approximately 25 revolutions per minute.[80]
Rotor (2) Chance Rides (Rotor) 1969 1971 A stick-to-the-walls spinning flat ride. Relocated to Kings Island.
Round-Up (Children's Ride) 1934 Closed Children's ride in the Land of Oz with pigs, goats, and broncos.[28]
Rub-a-Dub-Dub (Children's Ride) 1941 Closed Children's ride located in the Land of Oz.[34]
Serpentine Railway (Miniature Railway) 1900s Closed Miniature railway. Signage also referred to it as "Miniature Ry."[81]
Scenic Railway (Scenic Railway) 1898 Closed Included a tunnel.[10] Assumed to have replaced the Hegler Coaster.
Scrambler Eli Bridge Company (Scrambler) 1957 1959 or later Spinning flat ride that replaced the Indian Mystery funhouse.[66] A 10-year-old rider was struck by the ride and killed its opening year.[82]
Scrambler (2) Eli Bridge Company (Scrambler) 1969 1971 Traditional amusement-park ride manufactured by Eli Bridge Company. Three arms spin riders giving them the sensation of almost hitting the wall. Relocated to Kings Island.
Shoot the Chutes (Shoot the Chutes) 1890s 1898 Shoot-the-chutes into Lake Como. Built by William Ward Devore and also known as Coasting Launch.[62]
Shoot the Chutes (2) (Shoot the Chutes) 1899 1910 Said to cost $10,000. Passengers ascended and descended the hill in the same boat, unlike its predecessor.[10]
Shoot the Chutes (3) (Shoot the Chutes) 1911 1913 Rebuild of former Shoot the Chutes; larger than its predecessor.[83] Destroyed by fire on June 17, 1913.[47]
Shoot the Chutes (4) (Shoot the Chutes) 1910s 1921 Replaced Shoot the Chutes that was destroyed by fire in 1913. Received new, faster sled-bottomed boats for 1916 season.[84] Removed alongside addition of Mystic Mill Chute in 1922.[31]
Shooting Star (Wooden Coaster) 1947 1971 Wooden roller coaster that re-used the station, lift, and final spiral helix of the Clipper.[85] Included nine new hills to connect the ends. The ride was 88 feet (27 m) tall, 2,950 feet (900 m) feet long, and reached a maximum speed of approximately 43 miles per hour (69 km/h).[86] Designed by Herbert Schmeck.[39] A 40-year-old woman was ejected from the ride and fell to her death in May 1947 shortly after the ride opened.[86] A large new marquee with 3,500 light bulbs was added in 1963.[87] An 18-year-old man fell to his death from the ride in 1966.[88]
Showboat, The (Funhouse) 1936 1946 At times referred to as The Show Boat. Funhouse designed by Paul G. Hill and built to resemble a river steamboat.[89] Replaced Sky Rocket.[90] Included a Laffing Sal figure dubbed "Show Boat Sal" and an exposed second level with jets of air which would expose unsuspecting guests in skirts or dresses.[91] Renovated into Mirror Maze in 1947.[75]
Sky Diver Chance Rides (Sky Diver) 1966 1960s Sometimes referred to as Skydiver. Large thrill ride that resembled a Ferris Wheel but inverted passengers. Cost the park $55,000.[15]
Sky Fighters 1954 Closed Children's ride located in the Land of Oz.[92]
Sky Rocket (Wooden Coaster) 1921 1935 or earlier At times referred to as Skyrocket or Greyhound. Roller coaster designed by John A Miller.[93] Featured an under-the-track wheel system which locked the cars to the track. Ride included fourteen dips and allegedly cost $40,000. Frank Thomas was in charge of its construction.[31] Ride was rebuilt in mid-1920s with a first drop that took passengers all the way to the ground and a modified back turn.[4] Ride replaced with Show Boat funhouse.[90] Ride's machinery saved for use on Clipper.[35]
Sky Slide (Mat Slide) 1969 1971 Giant slide. Relocated to Kings Island (1972–1995) as Flying Carpet and later Scrappy's Slides.
Skyride Von Roll (Sky Ride) 1965 1971 A cable-car skyride. Built in Berne, Switzerland and shipped in six different freighters. 1,200 feet (370 m) long with three towers, the tallest being 96 feet (29 m) high. Included 32 gondola cars. One station was themed as an alpine chalet.[94] Relocated to Kings Island (1972–1979).[95] One station remained standing at Coney Island until it was demolished for the addition of Riverbend Music Center in 1984.
Space Ship 1954 Closed Children's ride located in the Land of Oz.[92]
Spook, The Arrow Development(Dark Ride) 1960 1965 Dark ride with collection of comical and scary stunts. Ride vehicles were four-seat cars that resembled old-time automobiles.[44] Ride re-themed into the Bat Cave for 1966 season.
Streets of Paris (Funhouse) 1930s Closed Funhouse located on the Mall.[18] A retheme of the former Goofy House by Ernest Anderson. Included scenes themed to sewers and catacombs.[60]
Swan (Children's Old Mill) 1934 Closed A children's old mill with swan-shaped boats.[28]
Teddy Bear Philadelphia Toboggan Company(Wooden Coaster) 1935 1971 Junior wooden coaster designed by Herbert Schmeck.[96][28]
Toonerville Trolley 1935 Closed Children's ride added to the Land of Oz.[28]
Tumble Bug Traver Engineering (Tumble Bug 1925 1971 A 1920s Harry Traver classic that pulled five linked cars around an undulating circular track, similar to Turtle at Kennywood Park.[27] Relocated within park in 1926.[32] Cars and mechanical components relocated to Kings Island (1972–1985), but original track remained at Coney Island.
Turnpike Streifthau Manufacturing Company / Arrow Development(Turnpike) 1958 1971 Added at a cost of $100,000. Traveled around and over Lake Como and was 1,875 feet (572 m) long. Cars ran between two external rails. Light poles installed every 60 feet (18 m) along the track.[68] Cars from Arrow Development and a center guide rail added in 1966.[15]
Twister Philadelphia Toboggan Company (Wooden Coaster) 1926 1936 Enclosed wooden roller coaster. Designed by Herbert Paul Schmeck. Serial number 53 or 54.[14][4] Replaced Dip the Dips.[4] By 1929 parts of the ride's enclosure had been removed.[97]
Water Cycle Custer Specialty Company 1930s Closed Watercraft in Lake Como that passengers could pedal like a boat.[28]
Water Whirl 1910s Closed Ride located in Lake Como.[98]
Whip W.F. Mangels Company (Whip) Unknown - 1937 or earlier 1955 Classic Whip attraction. Survived the 1937 flood.[52] Replaced by newer model in 1956.[99]
Whip (Whip) 1956 1971 Replaced previous version of attraction.[99]
Whirlpool William Ward Devore 1908 Closed Enclosed ride that included mysterious caves.[58]
Wildcat (Wooden Coaster) 1926 1964 Wooden roller coaster designed by Herbert Paul Schmeck.[100] New entrance and cars with headlights added for 1956 season.[99] Removed to make way for the Skyride.[101]
Wild Mouse B.A. Schiff & Associates (Wild Mouse) 1958 1969 Wild mouse roller coaster with a series of tight turns.[102]
Zoomer Custer Specialty Company Inc. 1927 1931 Suspended monorail type ride with six individually powered cars that were connected as a train and navigated a winding track.[103] The ride never proved popular and was considered slow and jerky by its riders.[77]
Unknown - Junior Whip William F. Mangels 1967 1971 Classic Whip Jr. ride designed by William F. Mangels. Relocated to Kings Island and now known as Linus' Beetle Bugs.
Unknown - 1902 Roller Coaster (Roller Coaster) 1902 Closed Traveled from riverbank through grove and almost to Lake Como. Makers claimed it was the longest and fastest roller coaster that could be built.[10]
Unknown - Children's Carousel (Carousel) 1967 Unknown Miniature children's carousel.[53]
Unknown - Turtles (Miniature Tumble Bug) 1967 1971 Miniature Tumble Bug attraction.[53] Relocated to Kings Island as Squiddly Diddly.
Unknown - Hampton Hampton Amusements Corporation 1969 1971 Miniature carousel-car ride designed by Hampton Amusement Corporation. Relocated to Kings Island and now known as PEANUTS Off-Road Rally.
Unknown - Children's Electric Train 1 (Electric Train) 1932 Closed Installed behind the new Carousel building as part of child's playground.[21]
Unknown - Children's Electric Train 2 (Electric Train) 1935 Closed Added into the Land of Oz.[28]
Unknown - Merry-Go-Round (Carousel) 1800s Unknown Park's first ride; a mule-powered merry-go-round with wooden horses suspended from the ceiling.[104]
Unknown - Merry-Go-Round T.M. Harton Company (Carousel) 1911 1925 Operated by the Coney Island Caroussel & Bldg. Company with figures carved by Daniel Muller.[49] Refurbished in early 1920s.[51] Replaced with Philadelphia Toboggan Company Carousel #79 in 1926.[17]


Former attractions (Post-1972)[edit]

Former Pipeline Plunge
List of Former Attractions Post-1972
Name Manufacturer (Model) Opened Closed Description
Baby Bumper Boats (Bumper Boats) 1989 2004
Bumper Boats (Bumper Boats) 1990 2013 Replaced by Como Cruisers.
Carousel Chance Rides (Carousel) 1998 2019 Merry Go Round consisting of 30 horses and two chariots.
Como Cruisers 2013 2018 Battery-powered boats. Replaced with swan and dragon styled paddle boats.
Dodgems (Bumper Cars) 2000 2019 Oval-shaped bumper cars ride with a center island. A one-way sign is posted, although it is not always followed.
EuroBungy 2010 2019 Bungee Trampoline Attraction; riders are attached to bungee cords and can jump onto a trampoline inside a dome, it is only available on certain days.
Ferris Wheel Eli Bridge Company (Ferris Wheel) 1990 2019 Ferris Wheel; riders ascend 40 feet (12 m) into the air above Lake Como.
Flying Bobs Chance Rides (Matterhorn) 1994 2019 Purchased used. Relocated to Indiana Beach.
Frog Hopper S&S Power (Frog Hopper) 2003 2019 Bouncing spring ride with a frog theme.
Giant Slide (Mat Slide) 2001 2019 Giant Slide or Fun Slide; three-lane, approximately 25 feet (7.6 m)-tall Giant Slide.
Helicopters 1994 Closed Miniature helicopters.
Kiddie Circle Freeway 199? 2007 Carousel-car ride relocated from Kings Island.
Krazy Kars 1989 Closed [105]
Pipeline Plunge 1994 2018 Pipeline Plunge is a dual enclosed innertube slide. It replaced the Zzip. It was revamped during the 2011 season including new floats in which you lie on your stomach while riding down the flumes. It was removed before the 2019 season began and replaced by Cannonball Cove.
Python 1999 2019 Compact steel roller coaster; relocated from Splash Zone Water Park (1996-1999)
River Runner (Swinging Ship) 2008 2019 Pirate Ship (ride); relocated from Wild West World after its closure. Canoe-themed.
Rock-O-Plane Eyerly Aircraft Company (Rock-O-Plane) 2007 2019 Originally opened at LeSourdesville Lake in 1949.
Scrambler Eli Bridge Company (Scrambler) 1991 2019 Classic spinning flat ride.
Scream Machine Moser (Spring Ride) 2005 2019 50 feet (15 m)-tall free fall
Sky Fighters Closed Relocated from defunct Fantasy Farm park.
Spin-A-Ree 1994 Closed
Super Round Up (Round-Up) 1993 2019 Spinning flat ride that tilts upwards.
Super Slide Dartron Industries (Mat Slide) 2001 Closed
Spin-A-Ree 1994 2007
TopSpin SBF Visa Group (Midi Dance Party 360) 2015 2019 SBF Visa Group Midi Dance Party 360.
Tilt-A-Whirl (Tilt-a-Whirl) 1992 2019 Standard Tilt-A-Whirl painted green and purple. Relocated from defunct Fantasy Farm park.
Tempest Grover Watkins (Tempest) 2001 2019 "A tornado-like whirling dervish that cannot be found anywhere else in the state of Ohio." Relocated from Americana/Lesourdesville Lake Amusement Park.
Trabant 1993 2010 Replaced by Wipeout
Wipeout Moser Rides 2014 2019 Spinning Lift Ride; opened at Coney Island in 2014, flips riders upside down in circles 20 feet in the air.
Zoom Flume (Waterslide) 1977 2008 Zoom Flume, which had wooden supports, was the first of Sunlite Pool's large slides. It was removed at the end of the 2008 season and replaced by The Twister.
Zzip 1984 1993 The Zzip was similar to its successor, the Pipeline Plunge.

Events[edit]

Coney Island serves as the location for several festivals, including Summerfair Arts Festival, the "Cincinnati Celtic World Festival", the Appalachian Festival and the Cincinnati Flower and Farm Fest. Concerts are also held in the Moonlite Gardens area of the park, most notably by Over the Rhine.

Scenes from the old children's TV show The Banana Splits were filmed on location at Coney Island.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jacques, Charles Jr. (2002). Cincinnati's Coney Island. Amusement Park Journal. p. 2. ISBN 0-9614392-8-9.
  2. ^ "Coney Island History". Archived from the original on 2012-08-06. Retrieved 2010-08-02.
  3. ^ Jacques, Charles Jr. (2002). Cincinnati's Coney Island. Amusement Park Journal. p. 80. ISBN 0-9614392-8-9.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Jacques, Charles Jr. (2002). Cincinnati's Coney Island. Amusement Park Journal. pp. 60–61. ISBN 0-9614392-8-9.
  5. ^ Jacques, Charles Jr. (2002). Cincinnati's Coney Island. Amusement Park Journal. p. 52. ISBN 0-9614392-8-9.
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External links[edit]