Confectionery store

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Freak Lunchbox candy store in Halifax, Nova Scotia

A confectionery store (more commonly referred to as a sweet shop in the United Kingdom, a candy store in North America, or a lolly shop[1] in Australia) sells confectionery and the intended market is usually children. Most confectionery stores are filled with an assortment of sweets far larger than a grocer or convenience store could accommodate. They often offer a selection of old-fashioned treats and sweets from different countries. Very often unchanged in layout since their inception, confectioneries are known for their warming and nostalgic feel.[2][3][4][5] The village of Pateley Bridge claims to have the oldest confectionery store in England.

History[edit]

"The Great Buddha Sweet Shop" from Akizato Rito's Miyako meisho zue (1787)

Akisato Ritō's Miyako meisho zue (An Illustrated Guide to the Capital) from 1787 describes a confectionery store situated near the Great Buddha erected by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, then one of Kyoto's most important tourist attractions.[6]

In 1917, there were 55 confectionery shops in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, which had a population of 70,000 people.[7]

The oldest sweet shop in England, in the village of Pateley Bridge

Modern confectionery stores[edit]

Products[edit]

See List of candies.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bruce Moore, Chief Editor, The Australian Oxford Dictionary, 2nd edition (2004). "Lolly (n)". oxfordreference.com. Retrieved 2011-04-29. 
  2. ^ "Confectionery Timeline". Archived from the original on 2006-08-27. Retrieved 2006-09-10. 
  3. ^ "Fannie May - History of Chocolate". Retrieved 2006-09-10. 
  4. ^ "Orne's Candy Store - History". Retrieved 2014-08-19. 
  5. ^ "CXP Brief A Detailed Description of the Candy Store and Candy Shop- History". Retrieved 2014-08-19. 
  6. ^ Berry, Mary Elizabeth (2006). Japan in Print Information and Nation in the Early Modern Period. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. pp. 182–184. ISBN 9780520254176. 
  7. ^ "BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS OF HARRISBURG'S OLD EIGHTH WARD, 1890–1917". Penn State University Press. 2005. JSTOR 27778700.   – via JSTOR (subscription required)