Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition

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Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
AbbreviationCVPR
DisciplineComputer vision
Publication details
PublisherIEEE
History1985-present
FrequencyAnnual

The Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) is an annual conference on computer vision and pattern recognition, which is regarded as one of the most important conferences in its field.[1][2]

Affiliations[edit]

CVPR was first held in Washington DC in 1983 by Takeo Kanade and Dana Ballard (previously the conference was named Pattern Recognition and Image Processing).[3] From 1985-2010 it was sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society. In 2011 it was also co-sponsored by University of Colorado Colorado Springs. Since 2012 it has been co-sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society and the Computer Vision Foundation, which provides open access to the conference papers.[4]

Scope[edit]

CVPR considers a wide range of topics related to computer vision and pattern recognition—basically any topic that is extracting structures or answers from images or video or applying mathematical methods to data to extract or recognize patterns. Each year the conference has an explicit list of topics for that year.

The conference is highly selective with generally <30% acceptance rates for all papers and <5% for oral presentations.[5] It is managed by a rotating group of volunteers who are chosen in a public election at the PAMI-TC meeting four years before the meeting. CVPR uses a multi-tier double-blind peer review process. The program chairs (who cannot submit papers), select area chairs who manage the reviewers for their subset of submissions.

Location[edit]

The conference is usually held in June and rotates around the U.S. generally West, Central, and East.

Awards[edit]

CVPR Best Paper Award[edit]

These awards[6] are picked by committees delegated by the program chairs of the conference.

Longuet-Higgins Prize[edit]

The Longuet-Higgins Prize recognizes CVPR papers from ten years ago that have made a significant impact on computer vision research.

PAMI Young Researcher Award[edit]

The Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (PAMI) Young Researcher Award is an award given by the Technical Committee on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TCPAMI) of the IEEE Computer Society to a researcher within 7 years of completing their Ph.D. for outstanding early career research contributions.[7] Candidates are nominated by the computer vision community, with winners selected by a committee of senior researchers in the field. This award was originally instituted in 2012 by the journal Image and Vision Computing, also presented at the CVPR, and the IVC continues to sponsor the award.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&vq=en&view_op=list_hcore&venue=l60tToE7K3UJ.2014
  2. ^ Australian Ranking of ICT Conferences Archived 2013-04-09 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ http://www.worldcat.org/title/ieee-computer-society-conference-on-computer-vision-and-pattern-recognition-cvpr-1983-conf-washingtondc-proceedings-computer-vision-and-pattern-recognition/oclc/472099962
  4. ^ http://openaccess.thecvf.com/menu.py
  5. ^ https://github.com/lixin4ever/Conference-Acceptance-Rate
  6. ^ "CVPR Best Paper Award". IEEE Computer Society website. IEEE. Retrieved 3 April 2019.
  7. ^ "PAMI Young Research Award". IEEE Computer Society website. IEEE. Retrieved 22 January 2014.
  8. ^ "Inaugural image and vision computing outstanding young researcher award winner announced". Image and Vision Computing. Elsevier. 30 (9): 603. 2012. doi:10.1016/j.imavis.2012.07.008. ISSN 0262-8856.
  9. ^ "Awards". Retrieved 22 January 2014.

External links[edit]