Congenital afibrinogenemia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Congenital afibrinogenemia
Classification and external resources
Specialty hematology
ICD-10 D68.2
ICD-9-CM 286.3
OMIM 202400
DiseasesDB 307
MedlinePlus 001313
eMedicine ped/3042
MeSH D000347

Congenital afibrinogenemia is a rare, genetically inherited blood disorder in which the blood does not clot normally due to the lack of fibrinogen, a blood protein necessary for coagulation.[1] This disorder is autosomal recessive, meaning that two unaffected parents can have a child with the disorder.[2] The lack of fibrinogen expresses itself with excessive and, at times, uncontrollable bleeding.[3]

Symptoms[edit]

As this is a disorder that is present in an individual from birth, there are no warning signs to look for. The first symptom usually seen is hemorrhage from the umbilical cord that is difficult to stop.[2]

Other symptoms include:[4]

Spontaneous bleeding of the mouth, nose, and gastrointestinal tract are common. Since blood clots can not be formed, minor injuries tend to lead to excessive bleeding or bruising. The biggest concern for individuals with afibrogenemia is CNS hemorrhage, bleeding in the brain, which can be fatal.

Many of these symptoms are chronic, and will continue to occur for the entirety of the affected individual's life.

Causes[edit]

A missense or nonsense mutation to the genes that code for the fibrinogen protein are affected. Usually the mutation leads to an early stop in the production of the protein.[3] Due to the problem being genetically based, there is no way to prevent the disease. Individuals can get genetic testing done to see if they are a carrier of the trait, and if so may choose to complete genetic counseling to better understand the disorder and help manage family planning. Parents can choose to do prenatal genetic testing for the disorder to determine if their child will have the disease.[6] The only risk factor is if both parents of a child carry the recessive allele linked to the disorder.

Mechanism of Disorder[edit]

Individuals with the disorder have a mutation to their fibrinogen gene that prevents the formation of the protein.[3] In normal conditions, fibrinogen is converted to fibrin when it is cleaved by the enzyme thrombin in the blood. The newly formed fibrin forms a fiber-rich network that helps trap red blood cells to start the coagulation process and form a clot.[7] Since there is no fibrinogen present during afibrogenemia, fibrin can not be formed to aid in this process.

Diagnosis[edit]

Diagnostic tests[edit]

When a problem of fibrinogen is suspected, the following tests can be ordered:

Blood fibrinogen levels of less than 0.1 g/L and prolonged bleeding test times are indicators of an individual having afibrogenemia.[2]

Treatment & Prognosis[edit]

The most common treatments are transfusions of cryoprecipitate or blood plasma to help with bleeding episodes or prior to surgery.[9] There are no known cures or forms of holistic care to date. Most complications arise from the symptoms of the disorder. As there is not much data out on the life expectancy of an individual with afibrogenemia, it is difficult to determine the average lifespan. However, the leading cause of death thus far is linked to CNS hemorrhage and postoperative bleeding.[5]

Current Research[edit]

Currently research is based in pharmacological treatments.[10]A case from 2015 was seen in which congenital afibrogenemia was resolved in a patient after receiving a liver transplant.[11] Further research must be completed.

History[edit]

It was first described in 1920 by German doctors, Fritz Rabe and Eugene Salomon, studying a bleeding disorder presenting itself in a child from birth.[12] This disorder may also be simply called afibrogenemia or familial afibrogenemia.[4] About 1 in 1 million individuals are diagnosed with the disease; typically at birth.[13] Both males and females seem to be affected equally,[2] but it has a higher occurrence in regions where consanguinity is prevalent.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; De Moerloose, Philippe (2007). "Mutations in the fibrinogen gene cluster accounting for congenital afibrinogenemia: An update and report of 10 novel mutations". Human Mutation 28 (6): 540–53. doi:10.1002/humu.20483. PMID 17295221. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "Inherited Abnormalities of Fibrinogen: Background, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology". 
  3. ^ a b c Vu, Dung; Bolton-Maggs, Paula H. B.; Parr, Jeremy R.; Morris, Michael A.; Moerloose, Philippe de; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite (2003-12-15). "Congenital afibrinogenemia: identification and expression of a missense mutation in FGB impairing fibrinogen secretion". Blood 102 (13): 4413–4415. doi:10.1182/blood-2003-06-2141. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 12893758. 
  4. ^ a b c "Congenital Afibrinogenemia". DoveMed. Retrieved 2015-11-12. 
  5. ^ a b "Afibrinogenemia | Disease | Your Questions Answered | Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (GARD) – an NCATS Program". rarediseases.info.nih.gov. Retrieved 2015-11-12. 
  6. ^ Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite; Vu, Dung; Abu-Libdeh, Bassam; Bouchardy, Isabelle; Morris, Michael A. (2003-05-01). "Prenatal diagnosis for congenital afibrinogenemia caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the FGB gene in a Palestinian family". Blood 101 (9): 3492–3494. doi:10.1182/blood-2002-10-3116. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 12511408. 
  7. ^ "https://www.ebi.ac.uk/interpro/potm/2006_11/Page1.htm". www.ebi.ac.uk. Retrieved 2015-12-10.  External link in |title= (help)
  8. ^ Dysfibrinogenemia at eMedicine
  9. ^ "Congenital afibrinogenemia". www.pennmedicine.org. Retrieved 2015-11-12. 
  10. ^ "Search of: afibrinogenemia - List Results - ClinicalTrials.gov". clinicaltrials.gov. Retrieved 2015-12-10. 
  11. ^ Gallastegui, N.; Kimble, E. L.; Harrington, T. J. (2015-09-01). "Resolution of fibrinogen deficiency in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia after liver transplantation". Haemophilia: n/a–n/a. doi:10.1111/hae.12802. ISSN 1365-2516. 
  12. ^ "Factor I deficiency (Fibrinogen deficiency) - Canadian Hemophilia Society". www.hemophilia.ca. Retrieved 2015-11-12. 
  13. ^ "Congenital afibrinogenemia". Genetics Home Reference. 2015-11-09. Retrieved 2015-11-12.