Congressional Accountability Act of 1995

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 (CAA) (Pub.L. 104–1), the first piece of legislation passed by the 104th United States Congress, applied several civil rights, labor, and workplace safety and health laws to the U.S. Congress and its associated agencies, requiring them to follow many of the same employment and workplace safety laws applied to businesses and the federal government. Previously, agencies in the legislative branch had been exempt from these laws. The act also established a dispute resolution procedure as an alternative to filing claims in federal court.[1]

The act is administered and enforced by the United States Congress Office of Compliance.

The act was amended by the passage of the Office of Compliance Administrative and Technical Corrections Act of 2015.(H.R. 1213, Pub.L. 114–6)

Specific laws applied[edit]

The CAA applies twelve specific laws to the U.S. Congress and its associated agencies, giving various rights to the 30,000 employees in the legislative branch.[2][3]

References[edit]

External links[edit]