Washington's congressional districts

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WA congressional districts after 2012 redistricting

The following is a list of the ten congressional districts in the U.S. state of Washington.

This article partially describes districts prior to the 2012 redistricting.

At large[edit]

From the time that Washington Territory was formed in 1853, through statehood in 1889, Washington Territory elected an at-large non-voting Delegate to the United States House of Representatives. At different times in its history, the state of Washington has also elected one or more representatives At-large statewide.

Current districts and representatives[edit]

List of members of the Washington United States House delegation, their terms, their district boundaries, and the districts' political ratings according to the CPVI. The delegation has a total of 10 members, including 6 Democrats, and 4 Republicans.

District Representative Party CPVI Incumbent time in office District map
1st Suzan DelBene, official portrait, 115th Congress.jpg Suzan DelBene (DMedina) Democratic D+6 November 13, 2012 – present WA CD 01-2013.pdf
2nd Rick Larsen, official photo portrait color.jpg Rick Larsen (DLake Stevens) Democratic D+10 January 3, 2001 – present WA CD 02-2013.pdf
3rd Jaime Herrera Beutler, official portrait, 112th Congress.jpg Jaime Herrera Beutler (RCamas) Republican R+4 January 3, 2011 – present WA CD 03-2013.pdf
4th Dan Newhouse official congressional photo.jpg Dan Newhouse (RSunnyside) Republican R+13 January 3, 2015 – present WA CD 04-2013.pdf
5th Cathy McMorris Rodgers official photo.jpg Cathy McMorris Rodgers (RColville) Republican R+8 January 3, 2013 – present WA CD 05-2013.pdf
6th Derek Kilmer 113th Congress.jpg Derek Kilmer (DArtondale) Democratic D+6 January 3, 2013 – present WA CD 06-2013.pdf
7th Pramila Jayapal 115th Congress photo.jpg Pramila Jayapal (DSeattle) Democratic D+33 January 3, 2017 – present CD 07.pdf
8th Dave Reichert, Official Portrait, c112th Congress.jpg Dave Reichert (RAuburn) Republican EVEN January 3, 2005 – present WA CD 08-2013.pdf
9th Adam Smith official photo.jpg Adam Smith (DBellevue) Democratic D+21 January 3, 1997 – present WA CD 09-2013.pdf
10th Denny Heck, Official Portrait, 113th Congress.jpg Dennis Heck (DOlympia) Democratic D+5 January 3, 2013 – present WA CD 10-2013.pdf

Historical and present district boundaries[edit]

Table of United States congressional district boundary maps in the State of Washington, presented chronologically.[1] All redistricting events that took place in Washington between 1973 and 2013 are shown.

Year Statewide map Puget Sound highlight
1973–1982 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, 1973 – 1982.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), 1973 – 1982.tif
1983–1984 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, 1983 – 1984.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), 1983 – 1984.tif
1985–1992 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, 1985 – 1992.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), 1985 – 1992.tif
1993–2002 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, 1993 – 2002.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), 1993 – 2002.tif
2003–2013 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, 2003 – 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), 2003 – 2013.tif
Since 2013 United States Congressional Districts in Washington, since 2013.tif United States Congressional Districts in Washington (metro highlight), since 2013.tif

State redistricting procedures[edit]

Washington is one of 22 states that do not give direct control of redistricting to the state's legislature.

The state's congressional districts are determined by a four member Washington State Redistricting Commission that is appointed every ten years. Two members are appointed by both of the state's legislative branches, with the Democrats and Republicans from each selecting one person. The four appointed members then vote to appoint a fifth, non-partisan chairperson that cannot vote. The commission is disbanded once they have approved a redistricting plan.[2]

In 1983, the voters approved a ballot measure to amend the state constitution to establish redistricting commission. The first commission created under the changes completed their work as part of the 1991 redistricting.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]